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The Thomas Hissam of Thomas Family

(22) Thomas Hissam (1778)
(15) Raphe Hesome (c1550) (16) William Hesome (c1577) (17) George Hesom (c1600) (18) John Heesom (1650) (19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750)

He was born in 1778 (or 1785) in Pennsylvania, but at some early date he was living in Westmoreland county. In the 1800 census for Unity township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania there was a boy, aged 15 to 25 years old, living in the household of Thomas Hissem. This was probably Thomas Jr., then about 22 years old.

The 1810 Hempfield township, Westmoreland county census as Thomas Hysin. Thomas was also listed as a resident in the "History of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania." Living next door was his brother, Abner Hysin. On the next page of the census, separated by just one entry from the rest of the family, is Thomas Hysim Sr. This certainly looks like Thomas Hissom and his two eldest sons. Thomas Jr's household included 2 boys under ten, 1 man 26 to 44, 2 girls under ten, and 1 woman 16 to 25. [Census: 2-x-x-1-x-2-x-1-x-x-x-x-x]

Thomas left Pennsylvania in about 1815, moving down the Ohio river to Tyler county, in what is now West Virginina.

In 1820 he was living in Tyler county, West Virginia having followed his father southwest, down the Ohio river. In the 1820 census of Tyler county, Virginia as Thomas Hissem Jr. He was listed just below his father, Thomas. In the household were one man between 26 and 45 years old, Thomas, who would have been 42, a girl under 10, and a woman 16 to 26 years old.

In the Tyler county Personal Property Tax List of 1825 were listed,

Hissam? Thomas (the 2nd)
Hissam John
Hewit Daniel
Hughes Jackson
Hanes Nathan
Hains Robert (Exempt)
Hissam David
Hissam Jesse
Hissam Levi
Howel Daniel
Hains William
Hains Benjamin
Hanes John
Hissam Thomas (the 3rd)
First, who were these Thomas Hissam's?
- Thomas (the 2nd) could be Thomas Hissom, brother to David and John. He was in Tyler county at the time, but why would the tax records reference a man, his father, Thomas Hesom, that had never lived in Virginia?
- Thomas (the 2nd) was, more likely, Thomas Jr., son of Thomas Hissom, who was, by this time, 75 years old. Thomas (the 1st) may not have been listed in the tax roll because he was no longer the head of the household, nor considered a tax-paying adult. Think of the Joad family in Steinbeck's "Grapes of Wrath." Tom Joad and his father were the decision-making adults of that family, while the grandfather had retreated to a more childlike role.
- Note that Thomas (the 3rd) could not be Thomas J. Hissam, the son of Thomas Jr., because he was not born until 1829.
- I suspect that Thomas (the 3rd) was the son of David, the eldest of those who accompanied him to Tyler county. This Thomas was the third, and youngest, Thomas of the extended family, who lived in the county, and was of age for taxation.

This list is only somewhat alphabetical. While they all start with "H," I believe the groupings connote households. That is, of tax-paying adults living in the same residence. This makes sense, and supports my ideas about relationships, in the case of David, Jesse, and Levi - a father and his two adult (unmarried?) sons - and for Thomas (the 3rd) if we assume he was "Thomas of David," an adult son living in his own home, and probably married. See also the two groupings of Hains in the same light.

However, what of Thomas (the 2nd) and John? I've treated John as the son of "Thomas of Thomas," David's nephew, but John would have to have been born no later than 1804, 8 years before his next known sibling, to have been considered an adult in 1825. Could this instead have been David's eldest brother, John? We don't have any records of John after the 1820 census. Might he have followed David and Thomas to Virginia after that time? If so, then unlike Thomas (the 1st), John was still considered to be an adult in the full sense of the word.

In the 1830 census of Tyler county we have a Thomas Hisam of Thomas. Interestingly, David Heysham's son Thomas was known in his own will as Thomas of David. I am assuming here that Thomas of Thomas was therefore the son of Thomas Hissom (1750). In his household were one boy under 5, Thomas J., who would have been 1 [Joab was probably an 1830 birth], 1 aged 5-10, William, who would have been 6, 2 who are 10-15 years old, John and Abner, who would have been 8 and 12, 1 15-20, Elijah, who would have been 16, and a man aged 40-50 years old, Thomas, one girl under 5, 2 that were 10-15, 2 that were 15-20, Sarah and Eliza, and a woman aged 40 to 50 years old, Isabell. By the way, there was also a David, Thomas Senr. and Thomas Hisam Jr. in the census.

In 1836 a Thomas Hissam was listed as selling 416 acres of land near Middle Island Creek to John Craig Jr.

Middle Island Creek

Technically a river, it is a stream about 70 miles long that feeds into the Ohio river. Running through Little, West Virginia, it cuts Pleasants county in two. It is known for its excellent fishing. Its name derives from Middle Island on the Ohio river which is located at the creek's mouth.

The 1840 census of Tyler county shows a Thomas Hissam Senr. This title makes sense if we assume his father, Thomas, had died by this time and, in fact, the old man had been 80 to 90 years at the time of the 1830 census, so I think we can safely assume that. In the household are one boy under 5, 2 boys 5 to 10, 3 boys 10 to 15, 1 boy 15 to 20, a man 20 to 30 years old and another 50 to 60 years old. Thomas would have been 62 years old. Women included one girl under 5, one who was 5 to 10, and a woman 40 to 50.

From records of his sons, below, he was a farmer, but also knew the trade of shoemaking.

In 1841 Thomas made a deposition in support of the pension request of his aunt, Elizabeth Heysham. In this he claimed to be 58 years old, or born circa 1783. The deposition was taken at Middlebourne, [West] Virginia.

Thomas' first wife appears to have been an Isabell White who was born on the ocean during her transit from Ireland. Isabell died between 1829, when she had her last child, and 1833, when Thomas' second wife, Rachel, had her first child.

Thomas Hissam's second wife was Rachel. She was born in about 1797 in Pennsylvania. In the 1850 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Thomas Hissam, a 65 year old farmer, born in Pennsylvania. He had property worth $3000. Living with him were his wife, Rachel, 53, his sons, Levi, 17, and Samuel, 11, and daughters Isabella, 15, Eveline, 13, and Frances, 4, all born in Virginia, or what is now West Virginia.

Thomas Hisam died on 22 October 1854 in Tyler county, West Virginia. A headstone in the Little Cemetery in Tyler county lists a Thomas Hisam who died on 22 October 1854 at the age of 76 [born circa 1788].

In the census of 1860 for Tyler county was Rachel, a widow, 62 years old with real property valued at 3000 dollars and other property worth 275 dollars. Living with her were her children, Isabel, 26, Eveline, 24, Samuel, 22, and a Frances V. Huffman [female], 11.

The 1870 census of Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Rachel Hissem, a 72 year old woman, born in Pennsylvania. She had a confusing assortment of people living with her. There was Jesse, 32, born in Ohio, Eveline, 28, Samuel, 26, Hannah, 23, and Okey, 2. Eveline and Samuel's ages are off, being five years too young. Hannah is Samuel's wife and Okey his son, see below. I'll guess that Jesse was a nephew or grandson who came to help out Rachel. Thomas Hissem's will does prominently mention a grandson, Jesse, that I have not otherwise found.

(22) Thomas Hissem’s (hilarious) will

“I Thomas Hissem of Tyler County and the State of Virginia, being weak in body but of sound mind and disposing memory, desiring to make some disposition of my worldly effects, do make this my last will and testament in manner and form following viz. As soon as is convenient after my demise, I desire that a suffiencey of my personal property be disposed of to defray my funeral expenses and pay all my Just debts.

2-ly. My son John Hissem [his eldest] has been already provided for. In addition to said provision I hereby give and bequeath to him after the death of my widow, one Dollar.

3-ly. To my Grand Daughter Flora Hissem I give one dollar, also to be paid after the death of my widow. [(24) Flora Belle Hissam (1875), the daughter of (23) William Hissam (1824)]

4-ly. To my Grandson Jesse Hissem, I also give the above named sum of one dollar as above stated.

5-ly. To my son Abner Hissem and to his heirs and assigns, I give and bequeath one hundred acres of land on which he now lives, as heretofore surveyed be the same more or less.

6-ly. To my son Elijah Hissem I also give one Dollar.

7-ly. To my daughter Sarah King, I also give one Dollar.

8-ly. To my daughter Eliza Shook, I give and bequeath one Dollar.

9-ly. To my son Thomas Hissem, I also give one Dollar.

10-ly. To my son William Hissem , I give one Dollar.

11-ly. To my son Jacob Hissem (perhaps he means Joab), his heirs and assigns, I give and bequeath a lot of land supposed to be Thirty acres or more, adjoining the land of John Kline, Mortecai Morris, Abner Hissem and Thomas Hissem.

12-ly. To my wife Rachel Hissem, I give and bequeath all my property real and personal during her natural life. and it is further my wish and will that the farm on which I now live be sold after my decease and the moneys arising from said sail be at the disposal of my widow to do with it as she may deem best for her own interest and that of her heirs. And after her demise it is my will and desire that my remaining lands be equally divided between my two Sons Levi and Samuel Hissem, with the understanding that they pay to my two daughters Isabel and Evaline Hissem two Hundred Dollars each, to be paid within three years of the death of my widow. And as to the personal property then remaining it is my will and desire that my two Daughters above named each get one cow and my sons Levi and Samuel have the remaining out door property equally divided between them. And it is further my desire that my household property be given equally to my two daughters Isabel and Evaline except two beds and bedding which are to be given to my two sons Levi and Samuel each having one bed and bedding.

And lastly I do hereby appoint my friend David Miller and my Son Levi Hissem Executors of this my last will and testament by me heretofore wrote. In Testimony whereof I have hereto set my hand and affixed my seal this 6th day of October 1854.

Signed and sealed in the presence
of us as the last will and testament
of Thomas Hissem and who
witnessed the same at his request.

Mortecai Morris (signature)
David Miller (signature)

his
Thomas X Hissem seal
mark

Tyler County Court, November Term 1854. This Last Will & Testament of Thomas Hissem deceased was presented in Court and proven by the oaths of Mortecai Morris & David Miller Subscribing witnesses thereto and thereupon the said will was ordered to be recorded as the Last Will and Testament of the said Thomas Hissem deceased.

Teste D. Hickman (signature) Clerk”

Thomas and Isabell had the following children,
(23) Sarah M. Hissam (c1812)
(23) Elijah Hissam (1814)
(23) Eliza Jane Hissam (1816)
(23) Abner Hissam (1818)
(23) John Heysham (1822)
(23) William Hissam (1824)
(23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829)
(23) Joab Hissem (1829)

Thomas and Rachel had the following children.
(23) Levi Hissam (1833)
(23) Isabella Hissam (1835)
(23) Eveline Hissam (1837)
(23) Samuel Hissam (1838)
(23) Frances Hissam (1846), actually a Huffman?

The Counties of West Virgina

This region was part of, first, the colony and then the state of Virginia. More a region of the Ohio river valley than of the plantations of the Old Dominion, when the Civil War came these counties split off to remain with the union and the communities of southeastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania with whom they most identified.

The counties inhabited by the Hissam/Hissem family, Wetzel, Tyler, Pleasant, Wood, Wirt, Ritchie and Doddridge, are grouped in the northwest of the state, along the Ohio river border. Note that the state was originally dominated by a few super-counties, like Ohio and Wood counties, that were subsequently split-up to create today's 55 counties. A family's county of residence could therefore change over time without them actually moving.


(23) Sarah M. Hissam (c1812)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

Spelled Hissum in one source. She was born in Pennsylvania and married Levi King on 7 November 1839 [or 1840] in Morgan, Ohio. Levi was born in 1816 in Washington county, Pennsylvania, the son of John King and Christina Yeager. Their children were born in Tyler county, West Virginia.

(23) Elijah Hissam (1814)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

He was born in 1814 in Tyler county [or possibley in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania before his father moved south]. He married Elizabeth, who was born in 1814 in Virginia. Her name appears later as Dorcus. Perhaps that was a preferred middle name or nickname?

In the 1840 census of Tyler county we have an Elijah Heysham. He's on the same page of the census as Thomas Heysham Jr. In his household are two men aged 20 to 30 years old. Elijah would have been 26 years old. The other man may be Abner, Elijah's younger brother. He would have been 22 years old at the time. There was also a girl, 5 to 10, probably Elijah's daughter and a woman 20 to 30 years old, presumably his wife.

In the 1850 census of Tyler county, Virginia as Elijah Heysham, a 36 year old farmer, born in Virginia. Living with his was his wife, Elizabeth, 36. Also living with them were a Jacob Smith, 8, and Isaac Smith, 4. Nephews perhaps?

The Ritchie county census of 1860 lists an Elijah Heiysham, a 46 year old farmer, born in Pennsylvania. Living with him was his wife, Dorcus Heysham, 46, born in Virginia. They appear to be running a boarding house for a group of 7 unrelated men and two children at the same address. These men include a railroad agent, several stave shavers [?], and one man, the eldest, designated the B [boss?] of stave [garbled]. Was Elijah hosting a crew building a railroad bed, that is the staves being the the railroad ties?

Record of Company 'G' of the Fourteenth Regiment West Virginia Infantry Volunteers in 1864: Elijah Hissam. Company “G” Fourteenth Regiment Volunteer Infantry, Enlisted Men, Ritchie County, W.Va. Unit mustered in September 1862, mustered out June 1865: Elijah Hissam. It is possible that one, or both, of the citations above refer to (24) Elijah L. Hissam , below, who would have been 16 years old in 1865. Our Elijah would have been 46 in 1860, a little old for war as we know it, but perhaps not at that time. The ancestry.com website holds him as Elijah Hisem.

Fourteenth Regiment, West Virginia Volunteers

The population of what is now West Virginia, when the war broke out, was, approximately, 360,000 men, women, and children. Of this number about ten per cent served in the armies - 28,000 in the Federal cause and 7,000 in the Confederate army. The Federals lost 3,200 men and the Confederates 824, or a total loss of 4,024 men during the war.

The Fourteenth Regiment West Virginia Infantry, a Union regiment in the American Civil War, was composed of men whose home counties included Doddridge, Marion, Monongalia, Ohio, Pleasants, Preston, Ritchie, Tyler, and Wood. They signed up for three years of service. They were organized at Camp Wiley, Wheeling Island, in August and September of 1862 and were mustered out at Cumberland, Maryland on 27 June 1865.

At right, West Virginia infantry volunteers at ease.

The 1870 census for the Harrisville West post office, Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia lists an Elijah Hisam, a 56 year old farmer. He was shown as born in Pennsylvania. His wife was Dorcas [sic], also 56. They had no children. There are eight men, all unrelated, who are living at the same address. They work on the railroad or at the stone quarry. Perhaps Elijah kept a boarding house.

At some point Elijah appears to have moved to Minnesota. He was listed in the 1880 census for Marysville township, Wright county, Minnesota as Elijah Hissem, a 66 year old farmer, born in 1814 in Virginia. His parents were listed as being born in Virginia. Living with him were his wife, Dorcus, 66, and Frances, 8, who was an adopted daughter. Frances was born in Virginia, so Elijah's move to Minnesota didn't occur until after 1872.

In the 1890 Veterans Schedule of Marysville, Wright county, Minnesota as Elijah Hissem [Elzah per Ancestry.com], Private, Company G, 14th West Virginia Infantry. Date of Enlistment: [?] Sep 1862. Date of Discharge: 3 January 1865. Length of Service: 2 years 3 months 25 days.

(24) Frances Hissem (1872)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Elijah Hissam (1814)

The adopted daugher of Elijah.

(23) Eliza Jane Hissam (1816)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

She was born in about 1816. She married William Shook on 18 May 1837. They had nine children.

(23) Abner Hissam (1818)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

He was born in 1818 in Pennsylvania, the son of Thomas Hissam and Isabell White, but other sources have 1812, 1825 or 1827. Also called Abner Heysham. At some point he moved to Tyler county, West Virginia.

In the 1830 census of Tyler county we have, in the household of Thomas Hisam of Thomas, 2 boys who were 10-15 years old. These were probably John and Abner, who would have been 8 and 12.

In the 1840 census of Tyler county we have an Elijah Heysham. In his household are two men aged 20 to 30 years old. Elijah would have been 26 years old. The other man may be Abner, Elijah's older brother. Abner would have been 28 years old at the time.

Abner Heysham married Elizabeth H. Piggot on 16 December 1841 in Tyler county. Elizabeth was born in about 1829 in Virginia.

In the 1850 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Abner Hissam, a 38 year old [1812] farmer, born in Pennsylvania. Living with him were his wife, Elizabeth, 32, son Lemuel, 5, and Elijah, 2, and daughter, Eliza, 7. Thomas Hissam, Abner's older brother was a neighbor.

In the 1860 census of Sisterville, Tyler county, West Virginia, we have Abner Hissam, a 48 year old farmer. He had real property worth $1600 and personal property worth $194. He was born in Pennsylvania. Living with him were his wife, Elizabeth, 40, born in Virginia, and children, Eliza J., 16, Samuel T. [Lemuel, above], 14, Elijah L., 11, and David F., 6.

In the 1870 census of Middlebourne post office, Union township, Tyler county as Abner Hissem, a 58 year old farmer, born in Pennsylvania. Living with him were his wife, Elizabeth, 51, and children, Elijah, 21 and David, 17, all born in Virginia.

In the 1880 census for Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Abner Hissam, a 68 year old farmer. He and his parents were born in Pennsylvania. Living with him were his wife, Elizabeth, 61, David F., 25, and David's wife, Rebecca, 19.

He died in 1882. Elizabeth died on 26 April 1901 in Shiloh, Tyler county. Their children were,
(24) Sarah Hissam (c1842)
(24) Eliza Jane Hissam (1843)
(24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845)
(24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847)
(24) David Franklin Hissam (1853)

(24) Eliza Jane Hissam (1843)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818)

She was born in 1843. Was she named for her aunt, above? In the 1850 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Eliza Hissam, 7. In the 1860 census of Sisterville, Tyler county, West Virginia, as Eliza J. Hissam, 16. She married Harrison Lightnor on 9 March 1862. They had two children.

(24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818)

He was born on 17 January 1845 in Tyler county, Virginia. In the 1850 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Lemuel Hissam, 5. In the 1860 census of Sisterville, Tyler county, West Virginia, as Samuel T. Hissam, 14, living at home with his father, Abner.

I do have a Samuel T. Hissam who enlisted in Company D, 5th Ohio Infantry Regiment as a Private. Also listed as Samuel Hisson. In 1861 he would have been 16, just old enough to join-up. He was discharged as a Private. A Lemuel T. Hissem, of Company D, the 5th Ohio, received a pension as an invalid as late as September 1871. There is also a Samuel Hissam who joined the 10th West virginia, but I think he was another Samuel, below.

The 5th Ohio Infantry Regiment

The Regiment was organized in Cincinnati, Ohio on 20 April 1861 for three months service. On 20 June 20 1861 they were enlisted for three years under Colonel Samuel H. Dunning. The unit served in West Virginia [where Samuel may have joined it] and afterward in the Shenandoah Valley where, at the Battle of Winchester on 23 March 1862, it lost heavily. At Port Republic, on the 9th of June, the Regiment met with a sad disaster in the loss of 244 killed, wounded and prisoners. It participated in the sanguinary battles under Pope near Washington, under Hooker at Antietam and Chancellorsville, under Meade at Gettysburg, under Hooker at Lookout Mountain, and with Sherman's Atlanta campaign and march to the Sea, to the end of the war.

The 5th Ohio was present at the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston's army on 26 April 1865 and participated in the Grand Review on 24 May 1865. It took part in 28 battles and sustained a loss of 500 men killed, wounded and prisoners.

The men were mustered out of service on 26 July 1865.

From the marriage record: Samuel T. Hissem, age 22, the son of Abner & Elizabeth, married Tabitha Ellen Shinn, pictured to the right, age 18, the daughter of Levi S. Shinn & Sarah R. Bogard, on 5 December 1867 in Doddridge county, West Virginia. She was born in about 1849, or on 19 January 1852 in Doddridge county, West Virginia.

In the 1870 census of Central township, Doddridge county, West Virginia as Lemuel T. Hyssum [sic, interestingly, this was not a transcription error, the use of the 'y' was intentional.], a 25 year old common laborer. Living with him were his wife, Tabitha E., 19, and daughter, Emma M., 1. Lemuel and Tablitha were born in Virginia. Emma was born in West Virginia. They appear to be living on the property of Levi and Sarah [Bogard] Shinn, Tabitha's parents. Levi was a miller and had a house full of daughters. Lemuel probably needed help getting started and Levi needed another man around the place.

By the way, the Hyssum spelling, and that of Hyssom, was also used at least once in the John Hissom family in New Jersey, as well as once below.

Samuel died on 28 April 1874 in Upshur county, West Virginia. He was only 29 years old.

In the 1880 census for Hackers Valley, Webster county, West Virginia, was [Tabitha] Ellen Hissem, a 28 year old widow. Her two children were Emma M., 11, and David F., 7. She was still living next to her parents, Levi and Sarah Shinn, but she now had her own dwelling.

Tabitha married Isaac Samuel Jeffers i 1883.

There is a Samuel T. Hissam in the 1890 Schedule of Surviving Veterans for Hackers Valley, but this was a man from Company C of the 4th West Virginia Cavalary. He was associated with an Eliza J. Jeffress mid...[garbled]/

Tabitha E. died on 3 May 1920 in Webster county. Lemuel's children were,
(25) Emma Maebel Hissam (1869)
(25) David Franklin Hissam (1873)

(25) Emma Maebel Hissam (1869)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845)

She was born on 4 March 1867(9) in Doddridge county. In the 1870 census of Central township, Doddridge county, West Virginia as Emma M. Hyssum, 1. In the 1880 census of Hackers Valley, Webster county, West Virginina as Emma M. Hissem, 11. Her mother, Ellen, was listed as the head of the household.

Emma married George Washington Bender in 1887. He was born on 4 December [June?] 1857 in Webster county. Emma died 30 July 1927 in Webster county, West Virginia.

(25) David Franklin Hissam (1873)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845)

He was born on 27 March 1873, the son of Lemuel T. Hissem and Tabitha E. Shinn. Apparently named for his uncle, below. In the 1880 census of Hackers Valley, Webster county, West Virginina as David F. Hissem, 7. His mother, Ellen, was listed as the head of the household.

He first married Orpha Anderson, the daughter of Samuel Anderson and Dehlia L. Cowger. Second he married Rohanna [Ruhamie] Mary Anderson; or was this the same woman? She was born on 4 August 1873, the daughter of George R. Anderson and Virginia Anna Pugh.

In the 1900 census for Hacker Valley as David Hissim [garbled, B?? Hessiner in Ancestry.com], a 27 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Rohanna, 26 [August 1873], and son, Elza L., 6/12 [November 1899].

In the 1910 census for Hackers Valley as David F. Hissam, a 37 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Hannie, 36, and children, Elsie L. [a son?], 10, Bertie R., 8, Guy E., 6, Day C. [I think Dae, above, was named after this man], 3, and Vina M., 10/12. Below is a photograph of David and Rohanna. I don't know the date so I can't guess who the children might be.

He registered for the draft as David Frankin Hissom in Webster county, West Virginia. I have not been able to get into this document.

David married Sarah G. [Anderson?] in 1918. In the 1920 census for Hackers Valley as D.F. Hissam, a 46 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, S.G., 25, and sons, E.L., 20, a coal miner, B.R., 18, a laborer, G.E., 16, D.C., 13, D.E., 9, and G.E. 6. His daughter was V.M., 11.

In the 1930 census for Hackers Valley as David F. Hissam, a 55 year old farmer. Living next door was his son, Bertie. Living with him were his wife, Soca, 34, and children, Everett, a 26 year old farm laborer, Day, a 24 year old farm laborer, Vina, 20, and Delmer, 17. This implies that G.E., above, had died, but I've found a Glenn E. Hissam of the right age in Hackers Valley in 1930 living with an uncle.

Ruhanna died on 25 January 1914. David died on 26 July 1939 in Hacker Valley, Webster county, West Virginia. Their children were,
(26) Elza Lee Hissam (1899)
(26) Bertie Ray Hissam (1901)
(26) Guy Everett Hissam (1904)
(26) Day C. Hissam (1907)
(26) Vina M. Hissam (1909)
(26) Delmer Emil Hissam (1911)
(26) Glenn Elden Hissam (1914)

(26) Elza Lee Hissam (1899)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873)

A son, born on 9 November 1899 in Hacker's Valley, Webster county, West Virginia. In the 1900 census for Hacker Valley as Elza L. Hissim [garbled, Hessiner in Ancestry.com], 6/12 [November 1899]. In the 1910 census for Hackers Valley as Elsie L. Hissam. In the 1920 census for Hackers Valley as E.L. Hissam, 20, a coal miner.

Elza Hissam, 30, of Webster county, married Annie Light, 20, of Webster county, on 23 March 1930 in Webster county, West Virginia, E.S. Pugh presiding. She was born on 10 June 1910 at Hodam Creek, the daughter of Arthur Andrew Light and Weltha Couger.

In the 1930 census of Addison township, Webster county, West Virginia as Elza Hissam [Elya in Ancestry.com], a 30 year old laborer in the mine. Living with him was his wife, Arnie, 20.

Elza died on 21 January 1971 in Kanawha Head, Upshur county, West Virginia. Arnie apprently lived the last years of her life in the home of her son, Gary W. Hissem. Arnie, "a resident of Twinsburg, Ohio, died on 4 June 2007, at her home." Her obituary:

Arnie Light Hissam, 96, a resident of Twinsburg, Ohio, died Monday, June 4, 2007, at her home.

She was born June 10, 1910, at Hodam Creek, the daughter of the late Arthur Andrew Light and Weltha Harper Cowger Light.

On March 23, 1930, she was married to Elza L. Hissam, who preceded her in death Jan. 21, 1971.

Surviving are five sons, Okey and wife, Anna Lee Hissam, of Kanawha Head, Roy and wife, Ruth Hissam, of Rock Cave, Darrel and wife, Pat Hissam, of Buckhannon, Dannie and wife, Louise Hissam, of West Milford and Gary and wife, Adrienne Hissam, of Kanawha Head; four daughters, Leona Underwood of French Creek, Garnieta ?Gay? and husband, Frank Baxa, of Buckhannon, Janice and husband, Bahram Nahidian, of Chantilly, Va., and Shirley and husband, Amal Zickefoose, of Buckhannon; 30 grandchildren; 36 great-grandchildren; and four great-great-grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by three brothers, Arnett, Melvin and Raymond Light; a half brother, Escar Cowger, a half sister, Percie Hawks; a grandson, Michael Hissam; and a son-in-law, Arnold Underwood.

She was a homemaker and a devoted mother and grandmother. She was a Methodist by faith and enjoyed cooking, gardening, quilting and embroidery.
Their children were,
(27) Leona Clarice Hissam (1930-twin), born 18 December 1930, she married Arnold Underwood of French Creek in 1952.
(27) Garrieta Gay Hissam (1930-twin), born 18 December 1930, she married Howard Franklin Boxa, of Buckhannon, on 25 December 1954
(27) Okey Doyle Hissam (1935)
(27) Roy Lane Hissam (1937)
(27) Darrell Rex Hissam (1940)
(27) Dannie Harold Hissam (1943)
(27) Janice Sue Hissam (1945), she married Bahram Nahidian, of Chantilly, Va.
(27) Shirley Rae Hissam (1948), she married Amal Zickefoose [Sickafoose?], of Buckhannon
(27) Gary Wayne Hissam (1951)

(27) Okey Doyle Hissam (1935)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873) (26) Elza L. Hissam (1899)

Of Kanawha Head, French Creek, Upshur county, West Virginia. He was born on 6 February 1935. He married Anna Lee West. His children were,
(28) Michael Ray Hissam (1967), born 3 July 1967
(28) Jeffrey Todd Hissam (1969), born 2 March 1969

(27) Roy Lane Hissam (1937)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873) (26) Elza L. Hissam (1899)

Of Rock Cave, Upshur county, West Virginia. He was born on 28 December 1937. He married Ruth Phipps on 6 April 1958. Her name was apparently Elva R[uth], and was also born in 1937. In 2007 the following were living in the household: Robert P. Hissam (1959), Timothy W. Hissam (1964), Jean F. Hissem (1964), and Todd Hissam. His children were, probably,
(28) Connie Lou Hissam (1957), born 15 September 1957
(28) Robert Paul Hissam (1959), born 29 November 1959, of French Creek
(28) Timothy Wayne Hissam (1964), born 11 June 1964, Jean was probably his wife and Todd his son
(28) Brian Keith Hissam (1973), born 18 February 1973

(27) Darrell Rex Hissam (1940)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873) (26) Elza L. Hissam (1899)

Of Buckhannon, Upshur county, West Virginia. He was born on 29 October 1940. He married Patricia L. Jarrett on 26 July 1962. Their children were,
(28) Brenda Kay Hissam (1963), born 12 December 1963
(28) Karen Lynn Hissam (1966), born 8 July 1966
(28) Terry Allen Hissam (1970), born 28 April 1970

(27) Dannie Harold Hissam (1943)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873) (26) Elza L. Hissam (1899)

Of West Milford. He was born on 12 March 1943. He married Louise Channell on 5 March 1966. Their children were,
(28) Cheryl Lynne Hissam (1966), born 27 August 1966
(28) Lisa Ann Hissam (1969), born 10 February 1969

(27) Gary Wayne Hissam (1951)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873) (26) Elza L. Hissam (1899)

Of Kanawha Head, Upshur county, West Virginia. He was born in July 1951. He married Adrienne.

(26) Bertie Ray Hissam (1901)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873)

He was born on 8 December 1901. In the 1910 census for Hackers Valley as Bertie R. Hissam. In the 1920 census for Hackers Valley as B.R. Hissam, 18, a laborer.

He married Dollie [Dolly] Jane Wood in 1926. She was born in 1904 and died in 1987. In the 1930 census for Hackers Valley as Bertie, a 28 year old laborer in a "grading railroad." He was living next door to his father, David F. Living with him were his wife, Dollie J., 26, and a son, Arden, 2 4/12.

He died in 1990.

(27) Arden E. Hissam (1928)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873) (26) Bertie R. Hissam (1902)

Of Buckhannon, West Virginia. He married Caryl Jean Allman. Her brother, Charles W. Allman of Kettering, Ohio, died on 20 March 2008. His obituary mentioned his sister, Caryl Jean Hissem, who preceded him in death, and a surviving brother-in-law, Arden Hissam. - from "The Elkins Intermountain" of 24 March 2008. Arden Hissam sold a property at 4077 217th street, in Fairview Park, Ohio. This is near Cleveland.

(28?) Bernard Hissam

Of Buckhannon. Power company district manager. There is also an Eddie.

(29?) Darin Hissam (c1982)

Darin Hissam went to Buckhannon High School from 1996-2000. His wife is the former Lorelie Shahan.

"Residents throughout the city of Buckhannon are familiar with seeing the officers of the Buckhannon Police Department patrolling the roadways. One of those officers is a woman who has a great passion for her job of protecting the city and those who call it home.

Loralie Hissam, who has been with the Buckhannon Police Department since August 2008, patrols the streets during the night with her partner K-9 Officer Tess by her side. K-9 Officer Tess by her side.

Hissam grew up in Preston County in the town of Reedsville and graduated from Preston High School in 2000. Following high school she attended West Virginia University for one year and then Austin Peay University at Clarksville, Tenn.

Her first job was at the Preston County Jail where she served as a correctional officer. When the jail closed, she went to work at the Tygart Valley Regional Jail.

In June 2006, she was hired by the West Virginia University Police Department. As part of her training there, she went to the West Virginia State Police Academy and graduated in December 2007. Hissam was with the WVU Police Department until August 2008 when she came to Buckhannon.

"Police work is exciting," Hissam said. "There is something different that happens each day."

In January, the Buckhannon Police Department acquired its K-9 officer and the dog became certified in February, Hissam said. Tess is a duel purpose dog, Hissam said, in that she is a narcotic, apprehension and tracking dog.

"I have always wanted to be a K-9 handler," Hissam said. "I have always loved animals and this is a dream come true."

In July, Hissam's husband, Darin, was also hired as an officer with the Buckhannon Police Department.

"We really work good together," she said. "It's great to go home and have someone to talk to, who understands what you are doing."
Darin was hired by the Buckhannon Police Department in June 2009. "Hissam has worked for the West Virginia University Police Department for the past three years and is a certified officer." - from "The Record Delta" of Buckhannon.

(26) Guy Everett Hissam (1904)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873)

In the 1910 census for Hackers Valley as Guy E. Hissam, 6. In the 1920 census for Hackers Valley as G.E. Hissam, 16. In the 1930 census for Hackers Valley as Everett Hissam, a 26 year old farm laborer. Guy Everett Hissam, 26, of Webster county, married Nergie May Cowger, 17, of Webster county, on 4 July 1930, B. Leggett presiding.

Everett Hissam, of Hacker Valley, aged 35, died on 29 May 1938 of cancer of the stomach. He was the husband of Nergie Cougar, and son of Frank Hissam and Ruhanna Anderson.

(26) Day C. Hissam (1907)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873)

His name is also rendered as Doy [sic] Kenneth Hissam. In the 1910 census for Hackers Valley as Day C. Hissam, 3. In the 1920 census for Hackers Valley as D.C. Hissam, 13. In the 1930 census for Hackers Valley as Day Hissam, a 24 year old farm laborer, working for his father. He married Hattie Parsons and had a large family. His children were,
(27) Robert Dale Hissam (c1935)
(27) Margie Mae Hissam (1940), who died in 1944
(27) Roger Wayne Hissam (1949), who died in 1961

(27) Robert Dale Hissam (c1935)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873) (26) Day C. Hissam (1907)

He married Virginia Mae Coffman. Their children were,
(28) David Lee Hissam (1964)
(28) Richard Hissam (c1964)
(28) Loretta Jean Hissam (c1964)

(28) David Lee Hissam (1964)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873) (26) Day C. Hissam (1907) (27) Robert Dale Hissam (c1935)

He married Shawn M. Mongan. He died on 21 June 21 1998. His obituary:

Martinsburg, West Virginia - David Lee Hissam, 34, of Martinsburg died June 21, 1998, in Winchester Medical Center, Winchester, Va. He was a construction worker and an Army veteran. He was a graduate of the New Castle School of Trade, with a degree in mechanics. Surviving: wife, Shawn M. Mongan Hissam; daughter, Samantha Nichole Hissam, at home; parents, Robert Dale and Virginia Mae Coffman Hissam of Monaca, Pa.; sister, Loretta Jean Sayre of Pennsylvania; brother, Richard Hissam of Pennsylvania; maternal grandmother, Olive Coffman of Little Birch; paternal grandparents, Doy and Hattie Hissam. Service will be 2 p.m. Wednesday at Greene-Robertson Funeral Home, Sutton. Burial will be in Coffman Family Cemetery, near Little Birch. Friends may call from 11 a.m. until time of service at the funeral home.

(28) Richard Hissam (c1964)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873) (26) Day C. Hissam (1907) (27) Robert Dale Hissam (c1935)

Of Pennsylvania.

(28) Loretta Jean Hissam (c1964)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873) (26) Day C. Hissam (1907) (27) Robert Dale Hissam (c1935)

She married a Sayre.

(26) Vina M. Hissam (1909)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873)

She was born on 27 May 1909. In the 1910 census for Hackers Valley as Vina M. Hissam, 10/12. In the 1920 census for Hackers Valley as V.M. Hissam, 11. In the 1930 census for Hackers Valley as Vina Hissam, 20, living at home with her parents.

She married James Thomas Gibson. He was born on 13 February 1912 in Braxton, West Virginia. He died on 13 April 1997 in Ohio. Vina died on 6 January 2001 in Guernsey, Ohio.

(26) Delmer Emil Hissam (1911)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873)

In the 1920 census for Hackers Valley as D.E. Hissam, 9. In the 1930 census for Hackers Valley as Delmer Hissam, 17, living at home. He married Nergie Mae Cowger.

(26) Glenn Elden Hissam (1914)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Lemuel Thomas Hissam (1845) (25) David Franklin Hissam (1873)

In the 1920 census for Hackers Valley as G.E. Hissam, 6. In the 1930 census of Hacker Valley as Glenn E. Hissam, 16. He was living with his Uncle, Ford "Jasper" Anderson, and his wife, Mary E. Glen maried Helen Mae Cowger, presumably the sister of Nergie Mae, his brother's wife, above.

(24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818)

He was born on 25 December 1849 [1847 per his tombstone]. In the 1850 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Elijah Hissam, 2. In the 1860 census of Sisterville, Tyler county, West Virginia, as Elijah L. Hissam, 11. In the 1870 census of Middlebourne post office, Union township, Tyler county as Elijah Hissem, 21.

He married Virginia Belle Keller on 28 November 1875. She was born in March 1853 and died in 1941. In the 1880 census of Ellsworth, Tyler County, West Virginia as Elijah Hissem, a 33 year old farmer. His father was born in Pennsylvania. Living with him were his wife, Virginia B., 28, and children, Pearl N. [a son], 3, Rosa M., 2, and Quintilla A., 11/12.

Elihjah died on 30 March [May per his tombstone] 1892 of Bright’s disease and was buried in the Archers Chapel cemetary in Tyler county. His tombstone is marked, "h/o V.B. 44y 3m 5d."

In the 1900 census for Ellsworth township, Tyler county, West Virginia was Virginia B. Hissam, a 47 year old widow. Living with her were her children, John O., 18, Quintilla A., 20, Truman T., 16 and Josie A., 4 [May 1896].

In the 1910 census of Ellsworth as V.B. Hissam, a 57 year old widow. Interestingly, she was a farmer. It indicated that she had 5 children, 4 of whom were living. I show it to be 6 and 5. Living with her were her children, John, a 28 year old farm laborer, Josieh, 13, and a grand-daughter, Goldie, 8. Whose grand-daughter I wonder? A Goldie A. Hissam is in the 1930 census as the step-daughter of Luther Hoopins [?] and Susanna.

I don't yet see Virginia in the 1920 census. She was probably living with one of her children.

In the 1930 census of Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Virginia B. Hissam, a 77 year old widow. She was living with her brother, William M. Keller. Virginia died in 1941.

Virginia was also buried in the Archers Chapel cemetary.























Archer Chapel Tombstones

Hisam, Esther January 29, 1863 w/o David 34y
Hissam, Effie C. 1887 1969
Hissam, Elijah L. December 25, 1847 May 30, 1892 h/o V.B. 44y 3m 5d
Hissam, Eliza A. 1878 1941
Hissam, Irene F. December 4, 1877 June 14, 1919
Hissam, Iva S. December 1, 1893 July 30, 1904
Hissam, Jane April 13, 1863 April 23, 1909 w/o J.E.
Hissam, Layman E. 1908 1917
Hissam, Lura M. July 15, 1904 May 18, 1905
Hissam, Pearly N. 1877 1936
Hissam, Rachel A. December 12, 1836 January 21, 1910 w/o Francis A.
Hissam, Robert Kenneth May 10, 1929 October 24, 1930
Hissam, Santford Gee April 4, 1874 October 8, 1953
Hissam, Thurman T. 1884 1951
Hissam, Virginia Belle 1853

Haught, Anthony 1905 1969
Haught, Anthony A. 1858 1937
Haught, Arza 1891 1922
Haught, Charles E. June 28, 1902 July 11, 1921
Haught, Dorothy Opal May 14, 1913 May 14, 1913
Haught, Essie 1892
Haught, Etta 1883 May 21, 1905
Haught, Forest Dale March 17, 1922 April 6, 1922 s/o A. & E.A.
Haught, Ida M. 1863 1924
Haught, John L. 1889 1963
Haught, Lena M. 1898 1923
Haught, Lennie 1887 1967
Haught, Linnie R. 1905 1982
Haught, Paul O. May 1, 1933 December 27, 1998
Haught, T.I. March 9, 1897 July 23, 1897 s/o A.A. & W.M. 4m 11d
Haught, William 1880 1955
Haught, Zelma H. 1885 1924

Their children were,
(25) Pearl N. Hissam (1876)
(25) Rosa M. Hissam (1878)
(25) G. A. Hissam (1879)
(25) Quintilla Amour Hissam (1879)
(25) John Oliver Hissam (1881)
(25) Thruman Theodore Hissam (1883)
(25) Josie A. Hissam (1896)

(25) Pearl Nathan Hissam (1876)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847)

Also known as Perly. He was born on 18 October [November] 1876. In the 1880 census of Ellsworth, Tyler County, West Virginia as Pearl N. Hissem, 3.

Perley N. Hissam married Eliza A. Starkey on 20 May 1899 in Tyler county. She was born in 1878. In the 1900 census of Ellsworth as Perley Hissam [Berley in Ancestry.com], a 23 year old farmer. Living with him was his wife, Eliza A., 21 [November 1878]. Perley's mother, Virginia, lived next door.

In the 1910 census of Ellsworth as Perl N. Hissam [Pert in Ancestry.com], a 33 year old farmer. Again, he was living close by his mother, Virginia. Living with him were his wife, Eliza, 30, and his son, Louis B., 8.

Perley Nathan Hissam, of RD1 Middlebourne, Tyler county, West Virginia, registered for the draft on 12 September 1918. He was a 41 year old farmer. His nearest relative was his wife, Elizabeth A. He was of medium height and build with brown eyes and black hair.

In the 1920 census of Ellsworth as Pearley N. Hissom, a 43 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Eliza A., 42, and children, Louis B., 18, Pauline L., 8, Dorothy O., 6, Maxine S., 4 6/12, and Pearl R. [a daughter], 1 1/12. Note that his mother, Virginia, is not living close by.

In the 1930 census of Ellsworth as N. Pearley Hissam, a 53 year old farm laborer, but he also owned his home. Living with him were his wife, Eliza A., 51, and children, Dorothy, 16, Maxine, 14, and Regina, 11. Note that just above Pearley in the census is the home of R. Clem and Josie Cline. He has a step-son, C. Leigh Hissam, 14. Might Josie be Pearley youngest sister and Laral the son of her first marriage?

Note: Also in the 1930 census from Drumwright, Creek county, Oklahoma was a Perly Hissam, a 43 year old oil field driller. Living with him was his wife, Iva, 34, to whom he had been married for 20 years. Also living with them were their children, Frederick, a 19 welder in welding school, born in West Virginia, and Carl, 17, born in Oklahoma. However, this man's father was born in the Irish Free State. This is not our Pearly.

Pearley N. Hissam died in 1936 and was buried in Archers Chapel cemetary in Tyler county, nearby his parents, Elijah and Virginia. His tombstone shows "1877-1936." Eliza A. Hissam died in 1941 and was also buried in Archers cemetary.

His children were,
(26) Louis B. Hissam (1901)
(26) Pauline L. Hissam (1912)
(26) Dorothy O. Hissam (1913)
(26) Maxine S. Hissam (1915)
(26) Pearl Regina Hissam (1919)

(26) Louis B. Hissam (1901)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Pearl Nathan Hissam (1876)

He was born on 4 December 1901. In the 1910 census of Ellsworth as Louis B. Hissam, 8. In the 1920 census of Ellsworth as Louis B. Hissom, 18.

Louis married Jackline in 1925. In the 1930 census of Wheeling, Ohio county, West Virginia as Louis Hissam, a 27 year old ball cleaner [?] at a Steel Mill. Living with him were his wife, Jackline [Josephine in Ancestry.com], 22, and children, Eloise, 4 6/12, Eileen, 2 5/12, Robert, 1 2/12, and Glenn, 2/12.

Louis died in March 1987 in Wheeling, West Virginia. His children were,
(27) Eloise Hissam (1925)
(27) Eileen Hissam (1927)
(27) Robert Hissam (1928)
(27) Glenn E. Hissam (1930)

(27) Eloise Hissam (1925)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Pearl Nathan Hissam (1876) (26) Louis B. Hissam (1901)

In the 1930 census of Wheeling, Ohio county, West Virginia as Eloise Hissam, 4 6/12.

(27) Eileen Hissam (1927)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Pearl Nathan Hissam (1876) (26) Louis B. Hissam (1901)

In the 1930 census of Wheeling, Ohio county, West Virginia as Eileen Hissam, 2 5/12.

(27) Robert Hissam (1928)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Pearl Nathan Hissam (1876) (26) Louis B. Hissam (1901)

He was born on 9 March 1928. In the 1930 census of Wheeling, Ohio county, West Virginia as Robert Hissam, 1 2/12.

(27) Glenn E. Hissam (1930)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Pearl Nathan Hissam (1876) (26) Louis B. Hissam (1901)

He was born on 18 January 1930. In the 1930 census of Wheeling, Ohio county, West Virginia as Glenn Hissam, 2/12. He died on 23 October 1999 in Wheeling.

(26) Pauline L. Hissam (1912)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Pearl Nathan Hissam (1876)

In the 1920 census of Ellsworth as Pauline L. Hissom, 8. I don't see her in the 1930 census, she may have died.

(26) Dorothy O. Hissam (1913)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Pearl Nathan Hissam (1876)

She was born on 24 November 1913. In the 1920 census of Ellsworth as Dorothy O. Hissom, 6. In the 1930 census of Ellsworth as Dorothy Hissam, 16. She died in December 1984 in Chester, Hancock county, West Virginia.

(26) Maxine S. Hissam (1915)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Pearl Nathan Hissam (1876)

In the 1920 census of Ellsworth as Maxine S. Hissom, 4 6/12. In the 1930 census of Ellsworth as Maxine Hissam, 14.

(26) Pearl Regina Hissam (1919)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Pearl Nathan Hissam (1876)

In the 1920 census of Ellsworth as Pearl R. Hissom [a daughter], 1 1/12. In the 1930 census of Ellsworth as Regina Hissam, 11.

(25) Rosa M. Hissam (1878)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847)

Also known as Resa. She was born on 23 January 1878. In the 1880 census of Ellsworth, Tyler County, West Virginia as Rosa M. Hissem, 2. A Rosa Hissam married Jack Bond on 3 July 1897 in Tyler county, West Virginia.

(25) G. A. Hissam (1879)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847)

A possible twin of Quintilla, below.

(25) Quintilla Amour Hissam (1879)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847)

She was born on 9 July 1879. In the 1880 census of Ellsworth township, Tyler County, West Virginia as Quintilla A. Hissem, 11/12. In the 1900 census for Ellsworth township as Quintilla A. Hissam, 20.

"James Edward Evans. He was born on 20 Jul 1874 in Pleasants Ridge,Tyler county, West Virginia. He married Qunitilla Armour Hissam. They were married on 24 Dec 1903 in Next, Tyler county, West Virginia. He died on 05 Nov 1938. He died on 25 Nov 1938 in Sistersville, Tyler county, West Virginia. Burial on 28 Nov 1938 in Archers Chapel Cemetery , Next, Tyler county, West Virginia. Reference ID was 628.

Qunitilla Armour Hissam is the daughter of Elijah L. Hissam and Virginia Bell Keller. She was born on 09 Jul 1879 in Next, Tyler county, West Virginia. She died on 10 Oct 1951 in Sistersville, Tyler county, West Virginia. Burial on 13 Oct 1951 in Archers Chapel Cemetery, Next, Tyler county, West Virginia. Reference ID was 184.

They had 2 children.

Othus Auburn Evans. He was born on 29 Sep 1904 in Pleasant Ridge, Tyler county, West Virginia. He married Ida Mildred Patterson. They were married on 06 Jun 1936. He died on 04 Aug 1976 in Sistersville, Tyler county, West Virginia. Reference ID was 632.

Senior Lawrence Oraton Evans. He was born on 07 Mar 1910 in Sistersville, Tyler county, West Virginia. He married Stella Adaline Hallobaugh. They were married on 17 Dec 1959 in Oakland, Garrett county, Maryland. He died on 07 Mar 1991. Reference ID was 633. Burial in Archers Chapel Cemetery , Next, Tyler county, West Virginia." - from "Descendants of William Jobes, Senior. Revolutionary War Veteran" by Michael Jobes
There is a Quintilla A. Evans, 1879-1951, in the Archers Chapel cemetary in Tyler county.

(25) John Oliver Hissam (1881)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847)

He was as born on 21 January 1881 [per the 1900 census, draft card says 1882 as does his tombstone]. In the 1900 census for Ellsworth township, Tyler county, West Virginia was John O. Hissam, 18. In the 1910 census of Ellsworth as John Hissam, a 28 year old farm laborer, living with his widowed mother.

He may have first married Iva Jane Haught, the daugther of Anthony Asher Haught and Wilida Mae Mayfield, and the sister of Effie, Thruman's wife, below. She was born in 1883, the daugther of Anthony Asher Haught and Wilida Mae Mayfield. Their daughter, Lura, was born in 1904 and died in 1905.

He married Lucinda B. Starkey. She was born in 1884, per her tombstone. This may be wrong - I also show that (24) Sanford Gee Hissam (1874), the son of Francis on the David Heysham page, married Lucinda. However, it looks like John was her real husband.

John Oliver Hissam, of #2 Sistersville, Tyler county, West Virginia, registered for the draft on 12 September 1918, at the age of 36. He was a farmer. His wife was Lucinda. He was described as of medium height and builde with light blue eyes and light brown hair.

In the 1920 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county, West Virginia as John o. Hissam ['C' in Ancestry.com], a 37 year old farmer. Living with him was his wife, Lucinda, 35. Naomi Starkey, a niece, and Benjamin Starkey, a nephew, are living with them.

John O. Hissam died in 1921 and was buried in the Greenwood cemetary of Tyler county. I haven't yet been able to find Lucinda in the 1930 census. She may have gone back to live with her Starkey relatives. Lucinda B. Hissam died in 1946 and was also buried in the Greenwood cemetary. Clearly she did not remarry. They apparently had no children.

(26) Lura M. Hissam (1904)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) John O. Hissam (1881)

She was born 15 July 1904 and died on 18 May 1905. She was buried in Archers Chapel cemetary in Tyler county.

(25) Thruman Theodore Hissam (1883)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847)

Or Truman. He was born on 5 November 1883 [1884 on his draft card] in Tyler county, West Virginia, the son of Elijah and Virginia Keller Hissam. In the 1900 census for Ellsworth township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Truman T. Hissam, 16.

He married Effie C. "May" Haught in about 1907. She was born in 1887, the daugther of Anthony Asher Haught and Wilida Mae Mayfield. Truman's older brother, John O., married Iva Jane Haught, Effie's sister. In the 1910 census of Friendly township, Union district, Tyler county, West Virginia as Truman T. Hissam, a 24 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Effie C., 21, and son, Layman E., 2.

Truman Theodore Hissam, of Middlebourne, Tyler county, West Virginia, registered for the draft on 9 September 1918 at the age of 33. He was a salesman for the Middlebourne Feed Company. His wife was Effie C. He was described as of medium build and height with brown eyes and hair.

In the 1920 census of Ellsworth, Tyler county, West Virginia as Thomas T. Hissam, a 35 year old clerk at a feed store. Living with him were his wife, Effie R. [sic], 31, and sons, Russel, 5, and Donald S., 4/12. I can't explain Truman's name except to suppose that the census take was confused.

In the 1930 census of Middlebourne, Tyler county, West Virginia, as a 45 year old "tool dresser" in the oil fields. His parents were also born in West Virginia. Living with him were his wife, Ellie C., 42, and children, Russell L., 15, and Donald S., 10.

At some point prior to 1935, the earliest mention of the family in local newspapers, he and the family moved to Zanesville, Ohio. In 1945 Truman and his wife lived in Zanesville, Ohio, near their sons Russell and Don, at 510 Warwick avenue. At some point they moved to 529 Seborn Avenue. This home appears to have been inherited by Donald Hissam who had been living at 521 Van Horn avenue.

Truman died on 12 December 1951 following a three-week illness and failing health over the last three years. Effie died in 1969. Both were taken "home" to be buried in Archers Chapel cemetary, near Sistersville, in Tyler county. In the same cemetary are members of the family's of Elijah L. Hissam, of the Thomas Hissom branch, and of Sanford Gee Hissam (1874) and his mother, Rachel, of the David Heysham branch.

Thruman's children were,
(26) Layman E. Hissam (1908)
(26) Russell L. Hissam (1915)
(26) Donald Sterling Hissam (1919)

(26) Layman E. Hissam (1908)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884)

Son of Truman T. Hissam. He was born in 1908. In the 1910 census of Friendly township, Union district, Tyler county, West Virginia as Layman E. Hissam, 2. He died in 1917. He was buried in Archers Chapel cemetary in Tyler county.

(26) Russell L. Hissam (1915)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884)

Son of Truman T. Hissam. He was born on 5 October 1914 in Tyler county, West Virginia. In the 1920 census of Ellsworth, Tyler county, West Virginia as Russel Hissam, 5. In the 1930 census of Middlebourne, Tyler county, West Virginia, as Russell L. Hissam, 15.

Russell learned to fly in 1937. A member of the Civil Air Patrol. Before the war he was a service manager at a retail store. The 10 October 1940 edition of the Zanesville Signal of Zanesville, Ohio refers to the staff of the electrical appliance department of Montgomery Ward & Company. Russel was "in charge of service."

During World War II he served for two years as a flight instructor in the Navy V-5 cadet flying school at Mt. Pleasant, Michigan. Many of the proto-naval aviators were from the University at Ann Arbor.

In August 1944 Russell, who had recently received his discharge, in company with two other men, purchased Commerce Field, the old municipal airport of Zanesville. Russell became the airport manager. After the war he became civilian flight instructor, flight examiner, and later a Fixed Base Operator (FBO) in Zanesville, Ohio with his brother, Don. That means he operated an aircraft sales, maintenance and training facility at the airport.

In a column in the same paper on 6 February 1949, called "And Speaking of Flying," Russell received first prize as the result of "the second official cruise of the Muskingum Airmen's association, a 110-mile flight . . . made without incident." There are a number of articles about aerobatic routines he flew in airshows to popularize flying. Noted to be a Dale Carnegie graduate per the Times Recorder of Zanesville, Ohio, dated 16 February 1954. Also a member of the Rotary club. Finally, from the same paper of 12 March 1958, Russell was mentioned as a previous winner of the "Boss of the Year" award. He was the president "of Southeastern Ohio Air Service."

The number of newspapers that mention his name is quite large. He was noted as the manager of the Zanesville airport, which had 26000 takeoff and landings, from at least 1960 to 1970. Named "Airport Manager of the Year" in 1967 by the International Flying Farmers. By 1967 he had flown over 12,500 hours [which is a huge number]. There is a statement of assets from the First National Bank of Zanesville in the Zanesville Times Recorder of 17 April 1973 with Russell L. Hissam listed a one of its Directors.

His wife was Violet Matthews, the daughter of H. E. Mathews of Nashport, Ohio. She appears to have also worked for Montgomery Wards. She was mentioned in a 1950 newspaper article announcing the display of kitchen cabinents in the building department. This was more certain work than in aviation. In the same year Russell was elected a director of the local Chamber of Commerce and in 1972 was its president.

He died on 29 September 1990 while still living in Zanesville. Of 535 Taylor Street. His children were,
(27) Robert Hissam (1956)
(27) Sue Ann Hissam (c1942)
(27) Marilyn Kay Hissam (c1943)
(27) Donald Lee Hissam (c1944) (27) Robert Hissam (1956)
(27) Layman Hissam. He was probably named for Truman's brother who died in 1917. He also died in childhood.

(27) Robert Hissam (1956)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884) (26) Russell L. Hissam (1915)

Mentioned as the son of Russell Hissam of 535 Taylor street in a newspaper article in 1966. In another 1966 newspaper article it mentions a traffic accident in which Robert was riding in a car with his "uncle" Don Lee Hissam, 21, below. There is, however, a wedding announcement for Don Lee Hissam in which Robert was listed as the brother of the groom, and best man. On the honor roll in the seventh grade in 1969. Today living at 362 Jessamine street in Zanesville, Ohio.

(27) Sue Ann Hissam (c1942)

(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884) (26) Russell L. Hissam (1915)

The daughter of Russell L. Hissam. A teller at the First National Bank [her father's influence?]. She married Thomas Grant Smith in February 1962. He was the son of Alonzo [Alonza] Ray Smith of Punto Gorda, Florida.

(27) Marilyn Kay Hissam (c1943)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884) (26) Russell L. Hissam (1915)

Known as Kay. The daughter of Russell L. Hissam. In Junior High School in 1957.

(27) Donald Lee Hissam (c1944)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884) (26) Russell L. Hissam (1915)

The son of Russell L. Hissam. He was on the honor roll as a Zanesville High School Senior in 1961. He attended Ohio University [graduated?].

He married Linda Diane Frizzell, the daughter of Kenneth George Frizzell and Genevieve Shoemaker of Mansfield, on 29 June 1969 in Mansfield, Ohio. They moved to Jacksonville, Florida where Don was serving in the Navy. Linda and Don are now divorced.

Don owns an acounting firm, Hissam Associates, and has a website in Ft. Myers.

Linda Hissam is a teacher of foreign languages at North Fort Myers High School, in Florida. Her biography from a school website:

"Born in Mansfield, Ohio. Divorced. Two sons, Gunnar and Dylan Hissam. Resident of Lee County since 1972. Teacher at North Fort Myers High since 1972. Adjunct Professor of German at Edison College since 2001.
Educational Background
Graduate of Denison University, Granville, Ohio. BA. Major: Germanic Languages and Literature. Graduate of the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. Major: Germanic Languages and Literature. MA and Specialist's Degree. Graduate of the Goethe Institut Muenchen and Schwaebisch Hall.
Their children,
(28) Gunnar Hissam (1974)
(28) Dylan Bryson Hissam (1979)

(28) Gunnar Hissam (1974)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884) (26) Russell L. Hissam (1915) (27) Donald Lee Hissam (c1944)

Of East Bay, California; sometimes as of Berkeley. VP of Marketing at Om Records. As of 2009, his age was shown as 35

(28) Dylan Bryson Hissam (1979)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884) (26) Russell L. Hissam (1915) (27) Donald Lee Hissam (c1944)

Of Fort Myers, Florida. Shown as aged 30. He appears to be a real estate broker. A golfer and marathoner [at least the Hooter's marathon].

(26) Donald Sterling Hissam (1919)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884)

Of 529 Seborn Avenue, Zanesville, Ohio. Son of Truman T. Hissam. He was born on 9 September 1919 in Tyler county, West Virginia. In the 1920 census of Ellsworth, Tyler county, West Virginia as Donald S. Hissam, 4/12. In the 1930 census of Middlebourne, Tyler county, West Virginia, as Donald S. Hissam, 10.

On 21 September 1940 he took the examination for the selection of scholaships for flight training under the Civil Authority Aeronautics program. 10 would be chosen from 52 applicants. I don't know if he got chosen. He was drafted in May 1941. He appears to have entered the service on 5 June 1942.

Don was discharged in September 1945 follow two years service in Europe as a master sergeant in the Army. He was a Flight Chief in the 60th Troop Carrier Group, flying C-47's, in the Twelfth Air Force. A flight engineer is the third officer on an aircraft, after the pilot and co-pilot. He manages systems, like fuel, electrical, and engine performance. Don was in the Mediterranan theater serving in Italy.

In November 1945 he married Mildred Helen Lawson. She was the daughter of Bertha Lawson of 727 Indiana street, Zanesville, Ohio.

The Muskingum Airmen's association put on a airshow in September 1947. To quote the newspaper, "Probably one of the most phenomenal exhibitions of the entire show was the glider demonstation given by Russell Hissam [Donald's brother]. His sailplane was towed to an altitude of 3,000 feet by a BT-16 piloted by his brother, Donald Hissam." Russell appears to have been a sailplane proponent, being featured at another show, this one in Bowling Green in 1948, which Donald also attended.

Don, with his brother Russell, was a Fixed Base Operator (FBO) in Zanesville, Ohio. That means he operated an aircraft sales, maintenance and training facility at an airport. He was co-owner of the Southeastern Ohio Air Service. He was listed as a "Charles Taylor" Master Mechanic, certificate #69127, of Zanesville, Ohio. This award is named in honor of Charles Taylor, who designed and built the engine for the Wright brothers Flyer. The award is issued to recognize certificated mechanics and repairman who have worked in aviation for at least 50 years. Of those 50 years, for at least 30 of those years the applicant must have held an FAA mechanic or repairman certificate.

Don died on 5 May 2002 while still living in Zanesville, Muskingum county, Ohio. The following is a tribute written to him upon his death.


Zanesville FBO

Thanks to Michael Maya Charles, of AVweb, for the following rememberance:

Donald S. Hissam, who with his brother Russ, owned a small FBO in Zanesville, Ohio. The two began their aviation business soon after WWII at a large rectangle of land north of town called Commerce Field. Russ worked the flying side of the fledgling business and Don fixed everything that broke.

The Hissam brothers eventually moved to the "big airport" on the east side of town. A WPA project, built before WWII for the nearby Army hospital, its two 5,000-foot, hard-surface runways arranged in an "X" and a grass strip nestled between the two, the airport allowed the Hissams to grow their business and thrive. Today, the "big airport" is Zanesville Municipal.

I began my aviation career at the Hissam's new FBO, Southeastern Ohio Air Service, as a lineboy at age 15. It was great work, and I was thrilled to be doing what I loved. The pay wasn't much, but the Hissams offered all employees a 50 percent discount on all flying. This was a godsend to a young lad interested in learning to fly, but an even better benefit to the job was learning from all those around me, especially Don.

The Man

Don Hissam was rather short and stocky with eyes that held you directly and honestly through simple glasses. His manner was all business and focused — if Don said it, you could take it to the bank. An even-tempered, careful mechanic, he seemed to never be at a loss for the fix — there seemed to be few things that Don hadn't seen or done before inside the cowling of an airplane. I never once saw him curse or throw a wrench. Don was the first true mechanic I'd ever known. Sadly, I've met few others since that could even hold his tools.

Don was a consummate storyteller. His memory for just the right details was keen and sharp, and he could recall names and places with ease. At lunchtime, I'd often linger a bit, enraptured, just to listen to him spin his magnificent tales.

When my gas pumps would get quiet, I'd often wander back into Don's shop and just hang out, watching Don and the other mechanics perform magic on airplanes that came in from all over. Don's reputation for good work was known widely and I was always amazed at the distances pilots would fly for Don's careful touch.

Though Don would probably scoff at the title, he was a true mentor. There's often confusion between a mentor and a know-it-all, and it seems that there are a whole lot more know-it-alls around an airport than mentors. But you can tell the difference between the two quicker than you might spot a cold sore at a slumber party. The blowhard is interested in making himself better — even if only in your eyes; a mentor only wants you to be better.

OJT

Don taught me a lot by doing, and much more by just letting me observe. He was a patient teacher, especially when I did stupid things like forgetting the drain plug on an oil change one day — two quarts of very clean Aeroshell 100 puddled on the clean shop floor before I figured out why my feet were getting oily. Some things you only have to do once.

Don sometimes asked me to clean parts in the big drum of Varsol in the center of the shop. To this day, whenever I walk into an FBO's shop that uses Varsol, the smell brings back memories of my early days in Don's tutelage.

Don always checked my work and matter-of-factly pointed out things that could be done better. No ego involved. It was a great feeling when he would look over the job, and pronounce, "Good." Nothing more.

Reach Out and Touch

Don and I talked by phone just a few weeks ago. We hadn't conversed in years, though I had been meaning to call him for quite some time. Time is precious and fleeting to a man like Don past his 80th birthday — and even to this writer, fast approaching 50. Our time on this earth is short when viewed through the wisdom and perspective of years.

It was wonderful hearing Don's voice again. I shared that I had gotten an A&P some years ago and thanked for him for getting my feet on the ground as a mechanic over 32 years ago in his small shop. His comment: "Good. I think everybody who flies ought to have an A&P." He wasn't being flip or smart — just stating a strong belief, fashioned by years of working on airplanes whose drivers didn't know a pushrod from a pushpin.

I told him I was a DC-10 captain now, an airplane just a bit heavier than the Cessna singles we worked on and flew in the old days at his shop. His silence told me that he didn't know much about the modern jet in which I made a living — here was a man more accustomed to Cubs, Champs, Skyhawks and the odd Aztec, 421 or even a Citation that lived at the local airport. But he perked right up when I told him that I sometimes fly a DC-3, actually a C-41.

He was the first man I ever talked to that didn't try to correct me, insisting that this DC-3 was a C-47. He knew what a C-41 was. I guess I should have expected that with Don. "Yeah, that airplane had the little Wrights; most of the airlines opted for the bigger Pratt & Whitney engines," he stated matter-of-factly. I told him that I actually flew a C-41A with those bigger Pratt powerplants, and he then quoted me many intimate details of the P&W engine that I'd long forgotten since my type ride just last year. I was again amazed at this man's ability to recall details of the old airplanes that he'd once worked on, some perhaps 60 years ago. But mechanical things were Don's passion and his life.

Passing On

This evening, as I sit on my deck, watching the sun slide behind Long's Peak on the Continental Divide, my world has suddenly stilled and shrunk. In a brief phone conversation with my father I learned that Don Hissam died a few days ago.

How could it be? I just talked with Don, not three weeks ago, and he was just like he always was: full of stories, sharp as ever, curious to know where one of his progenies had landed. I'm still astounded that he knew what a C-41 was — there was only one built!

It's amazing that people who were once huge in our lives can be reduced to mere shadow and memory with the passage of time. Don and his brother Russ were major players in my life when I was learning the difference between a Cessna Skyhawk and Ford Maverick. The Hissams played a huge part in who I became. And to this day, I carry the image of Don as the best "true" mechanic I've ever known. He is certainly one to emulate.

As I sit writing this, deeply troubled by the news of Don's death, I watch a jet pull a contrail westward into the waning light. This reminds me that there are thousands of mechanics that keep this aviation business aloft — but fewer and fewer Don Hissams in the world. And that is a sad thing for all of us. I feel so fortunate to have had the opportunity to thank him for his careful mentoring before he left us. Damn, I'm glad I made that call a few weeks ago.

The light dims so suddenly from an old man's eyes. Take a moment — today — to thank your mentors. Life is terrifyingly short.

Don's children were,
(27) Truman Theodore Hissam
(27) Theodore Michael Hissam (1947)

(27) Theodore Michael Hissam (1947)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884) (26) Donald S. Hissam (1919)

His name repeats his grandfather's middle name. He was born on 5 March 1947, the son of Donald S. Hissam of 523 Seborn avenue. A member of the Future Engineers Club in 1964. A photographer on the Zanesville High School paper in 1965, the year in which, I think, he graduated. He, however, still shared his father's interest in aviation. In 1967 he was vice-president of the Flying Muskies, a student organization at Muskingum college of New Concord for those interested in aviation. In a 1968 newspaper article he was referred to as a Zanesville student, a college junior. He appears to have been a drama major, appearing in a number of High School and Muskingum College productions, including "Medea," "Death of a Salesman," and "Waiting for Godot." He was also caught up in the folk movement, appearing at Inn Complete, the local coffee house, where, billed as a folksinger, he gave "readings." After earning a Bachelor of Arts degree from Muskingum, he became Zanesville High's drama coach in 1969.

He married Melinda Baroset of Newark road. They were living in New Concord, the college town, in 1968. By 1969 he had a daughter, Amanda. In 1976 he was referred to as the "well known Zanesville actor." However, also in that year known as the former Zanesville High drama teacher. There is a listing of substitute teachers in the Brunswick [Ohio?] city school district for 2002 and 2003 which has the name Theodore Hissam. There is also a reference to Theodore, of Bay Village, Ohio in the NUAN (Non-Union Actors Network) webpage. His "[i]nterests: Directing, Producing, Character Acting. Favorite Play: The Lion In Winter and Taming of the Shrew." I wonder if he knows Daryl Heysham, the actor of that line of the family?

I recently received an email from Ted.

8/28/2006. "Steve - my name is Ted Hissam - (Theodore Michael) - I stumbled across your web site this morning after trying for many years to make a connection with my last name. Our family is originally from from Tyler Co [West Virginia] and my relatives are buried here in the Archer Chapel Cemetary. I can go as far back as Hissam, Elijah L. December 25, 1847 - May 30, 1892 who was my great grandfather. But the line stopped there and I had no where to go until now.

I've attached the cemetary list with Hissam and Haught relatives )Haught was my grand mother's (Effie) maiden name. I'll give you an update of my relatives to help fill in another section. (It will take a bit of time to get the dates and background info) Would appreciate any advise as to where I can take the line back from Elijah. Also, can you expalin why the name change from the original Heysham to the several derivatives we now use?

Here's where I fit in:

Children - Amanda Katherine, Ryan Micahel, Lacy Michelle
Theodore M. (3.5.1947) married to Cynthia L. Lacy (11.30.1955) [a second marriage?]
Son of: Donald Sterling Hissam married to Mildred Helen Lawson (both deceased)

Donald's brothers: Russell married Violet Matthews (both deceased) Children - Don Lee, Kay, Sue, Robert and Layman (deceased in childhood).
Children of Thruman Theodore and Effie May Haught of the Archer Chapel Cemetary Records.
His father was Elijah and Virginia Belle.

My father and uncle ran the Zanesville Municipal Airport for over 50 years and were pilots and aircraft mechanics. Both were in WWII and I'll send war records later. My cousin Don Lee owns an acounting firm (Hissam Associates) and has a website in Ft. Myers, My daughter Amanda is in Fairbanks with her husband Donald Nunley and is doing research on the family name from there. I am an actor, producer, director and Event Manager and have worked for the Cleveland Cavaliers for over ten years and the Cleveland Indians, SeaWorld of Ohio, the Longaberger Company and recently completed a year contract with the Chevrolet Centre of Youngstown, Ohio as their "start-up" Event Manager.

My partner David Schubach and I work out of Hollywood where he is the former Vice-President of the Hollywood Musician's Union. For a period of time we lived in Mill Valley, CA and have been in Bay Village (Cleveland) for the past 15 years. Sorry I haven't got specific dates on some of this material but I will put it together and send it to you. I am so glad to finally make the connection with my last name and appreciate all the work you are doing with the family history."
Ted wrote again later,
9/2/2006. "The incredible part is that your Dad's experience mirrored my Dad's (Donald S.) completely. They both became aircraft mechanics in the war and Dad became a Master Srgt. and Crew Chief then Line Chief in Europe. After the war he was offered OCS but went home to Zanesville to start an airport with his brother. He was in North Africa, Italy and then France (I believe). I have his things in sealed plastic tubs in the attic and I am going to get them down and try to write down the details. I did get him to sit down in front of a video camera before he died and tell about the war (some) and the rest of his life (which was the Zanesville Airport). He put together a history of the airport on video complete with photos and I'm trying to find the master to make copies. I went with him to WVA one Memorial Day weekend and took a video camera. I had intended to use it at the small cemetary where our relatives are buried but as we crossed the Ohio River I put the camera on my shoulder and then let it run. We traveled back to his home town of Middleburn and he drove around to all the places he had lived as a child before moving to Ohio. It's quite a tape and this past week I have been converting all my VHS tapes to DVD's before they go bad. He put together one himself about the airport and I'll send you copies, if you would like. I have PhotoShop on the computer and am trying to put the old photos together with text in a form that I can send to you.

As much as your Dad and my Dad's lives follwed the same path (he collapsed at the airport, too!) My history became quite different. I was drawn to the theatre in college at Muskingum and to history. I went to England on a month's course my junior year and stayed for two years!!! I became obsessed with the Norman invasion and William I's conquest. I went to France to where Henry II lies with his wife Eleanor and Richard (the Lion-Heart). I trained for Shakespeare at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London and eventually played Henry in Canada in a play called "The Lion In Winter." I have played many of Shakespeare's kings but the "Conquest" always seemed to draw me to it. Last month I completed a book called "1066." It's really detailed from both sides and is based on as much fact as could be gathered. (I'll sned it to you.) I crossed both to France and Ireland by boat in winter to get a feel for the crossing and believe it or not I am married to a direct decendent of Hugh de Lacey!! (Cynthia Lee Lacy - 11/30/55) I thought we were Dutch but could get no farther back then my great grandfather Elijah L. 12/25/1847-05/30/1892. This opens the doors I couldn't get through. I know what you mean about this being so much more than dates. The individual stories are what counts.

You have given me quite an assignment and I will be working on this for many months. I'm going to concentrate on the war history first and send it to you and then get into the airport and family stuff. Hope this foind you and your family well and happy. I will try to reach you the next time I am in LA.

Thannks you again so much for all that you have done. Your cousin, Ted.
Ted's children are,
(28) Amanda Katherine Hissam
(28) Ryan Michael Hissam
(28) Lacy Michelle Hissam

Archer Chapel Cemetery Listing from Ted Hissam

Hisam, Esther January 29, 1863 w/o David 34y
Hissam, Effie C. 1887 1969
Hissam, Elijah L. December 25, 1847 May 30, 1892 h/o V.B. 44y 3m 5d
Hissam, Eliza A. 1878 1941
Hissam, Irene F. December 4, 1877 June 14, 1919
Hissam, Iva S. December 1, 1893 July 30, 1904
Hissam, Jane April 13, 1863 April 23, 1909 w/o J.E.
Hissam, Layman E. 1908 1917
Hissam, Lura M. July 15, 1904 May 18, 1905
Hissam, Pearly N. 1877 1936
Hissam, Rachel A. December 12, 1836 January 21, 1910 w/o Francis A.
Hissam, Robert Kenneth May 10, 1929 October 24, 1930
Hissam, Santford Gee April 4, 1874 October 8, 1953
Hissam, Thurman T. 1884 1951
Hissam, Virginia Belle 1853

(28) Amanda Katherine Hissam
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847) (25) Truman T. Hissam (1884) (26) Donald S. Hissam (1919) (27) Theodore Michael Hissam (1947)

Amanda is in Fairbanks with her husband Donald Nunley and is doing research on the family name from there.

(25) Josie A. Hissam (1896)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) Elijah L. Hissam (1847)

In the 1900 census for Ellsworth township, Tyler county, West Virginia was Josie A. Hissam, 4 [May 1896]. In the 1910 census of Ellsworth as Josieh Hissam, 13. I lose track of her after this.

(24) David Franklin Hissam (1853)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818)

Also known as Frank. He was born on 26 November 1853 in Tyler county, the son of Abner and Elizabeth. In the 1860 census of Sisterville, Tyler county, West Virginia, as David F. Hissam, 6. In the 1870 census of Middlebourne post office, Union township, Tyler county as David Hissem, 17.

David F. Hisssem [sic] married Rebecca J. Martin on 22 February 1879 in Tyler county. She was born in 1860.

In the 1880 census for Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia as David F. Hissam, 25. He was still living with his parents, but his wife, Rebecca, 19, was with him.

Rebecca died of consumption [or pnuemonia] not long after. David Franklin then married Mary Belle Williamson on 10 July 1884 in Tyler county. She died, perhaps in childbirth. There may be a child, but it died as well. David then married, for a third time, with Isabelle Perry some time between 1885 and 1892 in Tyler county. She was born in 1860. All of the children belong to Isabelle.

David was a school teacher in or around Friendly, West Virginia, before becoming a "railroader." This probably occurred in the 1880 to 1900 period.

Rebecca died on 4 July 1882 in Tyler county. Second David married Mary Belle Williamson on 10 July 1884, but she died on 13 August !889. Third he married Isabelle Perry in 1888. She was born on 1 July 1871 in Milton, Cabell county, West Virginia.

In the 1900 census of Clay county, West Virginia as David F. Hissam, a 46 year old telephone operator. He was from West Virginia, as was his mother, but his father was from Pennsylvania. Living with him were his wife, Isa, 28 [July 1871], and children, Myrtle, 7 [March 1892], Clarence A., 4 [May 1896], Ernest L., 4 [May 1896].

In the 1910 census of Buffalo township, Clay county, West Virginia as David F. Hissam, a 56 year old agent for the railroad (C.C.R.R.). Living with him were his wife, Isabelle, 38, and son, Clarence A., 13. They also had an adopted daughter, Susy Hudgins, 5.

The C.C.R.R.

The first railroad in the region was the Charleston, Clendenin, [Clay] and Sutton Railway in 1895. Before it arrived most all of the goods transported in and out of Clay county were rafted down the Elk River. In 1902 this railroad was sold to the Coal and Coke Railroad company of Henry Gassaway Davis. It operated between Charleston and Elkins, West Virginia. In 1917 it became part of the great Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, the B&O for you Monopoly fans. This firm was later bought by the CSX line and the line was abandoned in 1987.

The CCRR was an industrial line, running alongside the Elk river for much of its route, and serviced the mines.

In the 1920 census of Buffalo township as D. F. Hissam, a 66 year old railroad telegraph operator. He was probably working for the B&O railroad. Living with him are his wife, Isabell, 47, and Ernest Lee Hissam, a grand son, 9.

In the 1930 census of Buffalo township as David F. Hissom [sic], a 76 year old railroad agent. He was a widower. He was living with his daughter, Myrtle, 37, and her husband, John L. Douglas, 40. Myrtle had a large family.

"Also while I’m thinking of it, under David Franklin Hissam, in the 1930 Census sentence, when he is living with his daughter Myrtle and son-in-law, you noted he was a widower. The census actually says he is divorced. As you have probably deduced from my stories about Isabelle, Isa was pretty tough to put up with and I guess even D F Hissam finally threw in the towel, and ended that marriage. Isa was living in Milton WV in the 1930 census, and had Young Ruth Douglas, age 9, staying with her, one of Myrtle’s daughters. David F was 17 years older than Isa and he died well before Isa did. Ironically, she died about 17 years after D F did, so they lived about the same number of years." - Neil Anderson

He died in 1938 at the age of 86 and was buried in a Clay county cemetery. His marker was erected by Woodrow Douglas and names him "Pop" David F. Hissam. Nearby were the graves of Clarence, Ernest and grandson Perry. Note that David had a nephew named after him, the son of Lemuel Thomas Hissam, above. Isabelle Perry Hissom [sic] died on 5 July 1956 at the age of 85 and was buried next to David with a notation, "wife of Frank Hissom."

"I pulled Isabelle Hissam’s death cert. She actually died Jan 5, 1955 of a heart attack. My mother was 13 at that time, so she was actually in junior High school, not high school, when she had to go home from school every day to serve Isa her lunch for a month or two. I guess it didn’t take long for Isa to wear out her welcome, and C A Hissam was forced to put his mother in a retirement home, probably to keep the peace in his home." - Neil Anderson



"Newspaper article about DF ‘s wife recounting pioneer life in Ivydale where the railroad terminated, after the railroad relocated the family there from Elkhurst. She had to hike the last mile to Ivydale because the train derailed while bringing her to meet her husband , and how they had to live in boxcars on a siding at the depot for a couple of months, until they found housing. You also noted DF’s tombstone called him “Pop” David Franklin Hissam. According to the article, he was known to everyone around Ivydale as “Dad” Hissam. Isabelle also mentions her 16 grandchildren, which would be 10 from (25) Myrtle and 6 from (25) Clarence Almon, who was apparently also known as “Dutch” Hissam in Ivydale. Unfortunately, I don’t have the second page of the article."

"David Franklin Hissam continued to teach school in Ivydale during the day while working for the railroad depot and telegraph office in the afternoon and evening. That may partially explain why he was known around town as “Dads” Hissam, and why everyone knew him." - Neil B. Anderson.

Neil Anderson: "Apparently Isa Hissam didn’t seem to like the girls in the family much either. She would visit, and bring her grandson, Amos Franklin Hissam, big bags full of gifts and not one thing for his twin sister Mary Virginia. Uncle Frank and his brothers went and stayed all the time at Mamaw Isa Hissam’s, but my mother Janet and Aunt Mary Virginia never stayed there. They always stayed at Mamaw Friend’s, Bessie’s mother, when they visited Ivydale WV. (26) Amos Franklin was named for his grandfather (24) David Franklin Hissam."

"Later in life, when Isa was old, she moved in with C A Bessie at Ashland. She could not get around well or said as much, and expected to be catered to, which Bessie either wouldn’t do, or Isa wouldn’t let Bessie do. My Mother Janet had to come home every day at lunch time, from high school and serve lunch to Mamaw Isa in Bed. If lunch wasn’t served on time, she refused to eat it, and waited for dinner when her son came home in the evening from work. Eventually C A Hissom put his Mother Isa in a nursing home in Huntington WV."

Neil Anderson wrote again about a trip he took to West Virginia.

"We located Dr James and Barbara Douglas Boggs living 8 miles north of Ivydale. My mother said we visited them one weekend when I was 5 or 6 years old, which I remembered. Barbara is the youngest child of John Douglas and Myrtle Hissam [David's eldest daughter]. She was born in 1932 and means John and Myrtle Douglas actually had 12 children total, not 11. I forgot about her since she was born after the 1930 census, which is the most recent census available.

Barbara said that David Franklin Hissam and wife Isabelle did separate but never got an actual legal divorce, as David had stated on the 1930 census when he was living with his daughter's family, Myrtle Hissam Douglas and her husband John Douglas.

Barbara also stated that her mother, Myrtle Hissam had also said one of her twin brothers Ernest Lee Hissam had died of something like spinal menningitis when they were children.

Barbara said David Franklin Hissam taught both the twins to use the telegraph when they were only 9 or 10 years old, not just Clarence Almon.

One picture is of all the neighborhood kids on a wagon including Myrtle, Clarence A and Ernest Lee Hissam, not long after David Franklin and Isabelle Hissam moved to Ivydale. The boxcar in the background is supposedly one of the two boxcars the D F Hissam family lived in upon moving to Ivydale before finding a house, referenced in the "Pioneer Days Story" with Isabelle Hissam. Clarence Almon Hissam is at the far right in bib overalls. Mrytle Hissam is in the back row, 2nd from the right. Ernest Lee Hissam is back row, 4th from right.

One picture is portrait of David Fraklin Hissam by himself.

One picture is the family portrait of the the David Franklin Hissam family. Daughter Myrtle Hissam in back. Parents Isabelle Perry Hissam and David Franklin Hissam, With Twin Clarence Almon "Dutch" Hissam on the left by his mother, and twin Ernest Lee Hissam on the right by his father. Apparently Clarence Almon was always called "Dutch" from the time he was a very young child.

His children, with Isabelle, were,
(25) Myrtle Hissam (1893)
(25) Clarence Almon Hissam (1896)
(25) Ernest Lee Hissam (1896)

(25) Myrtle Hissam (1893)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) David Franklin Hissam (1853)

She was born 27 March 1893. In the 1900 census of Clay county, West Virginia as Myrtle Hissam, 7 [March 1892]. A descendant, Neil B. Anderson, recently wrote,

"(25) Myrtle Hissam married John L Douglas Jan 1, 1809 (you have the marriage listed as 1812). John and Myrtle Hissam Douglas were married and living by themselves in the 1910 census, at Buffalo, WV. They eventually had 10 children, 9 of which were still living at home and are shown in the 1930 census you reference. Myrtle and John’s first born child was Ernest Lee Douglas (whom you have incorrectly listed as a possible child of (25) Clarence Almon Hissam [since removed), and he was born 4-12-1910 and named for Myrtle’s deceased younger brother. Ernest Lee Douglas married Velma Hamrick Truman and was living with Velma’s brother and mother in the 1930 census. Ernest Lee Douglas happened to be visiting his grandparents David F and Isa Hissam in 1920 at the time the census was taken, and was therefore listed in their household as a grandson. Ernest Lee Douglas died 5-08-1957 in an accident at Hanna Coal Co.’s Ireland Mine, in Moundsville WV, when a falling stone crushed his skull at the age of 47. John and Myrtle had several children die fairly young or middle aged, and many are buried in the Douglas cemetery in Clay Co, WV."
She had a son named Carl Hissam Douglas, of Ivydale, West Virginia. In the 1930 census of Buffalo township as Myrtle Douglas, the wife of John L. Douglas. Her father, David F. Hissom [sic], was living with them. She died on 7 May 1975.

(25) Clarence Almon Hissam (1896)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) David Franklin Hissam (1853)

He was born on 20 May 1896 in Milton, West Virginia. In the 1900 census of Pleasant township, Clay county, West Virginia as Clarence A. Hissam, 4 [May 1896]. In the 1910 census of Buffalo township, Clay county, West Virginia as Clarence A. Hissam, 13.

He married Lobessie Eunice Friend on 27 December 1917. She was born on 20 August 1891, the daughter of Marian F. and Mary C. Friend of Buffalo township.

Clarence Almon Hissam, a 21 year old single man, of Ivydale, West Virginia registered for the draft in Clay county on 5 June 1917. He was born on 20 May 1896 in Milton, West Virginia. He was a hostler at the Coal & Coke Railroad company of Gassaway. He was of medium height and weight, with blue eyes and brown hair.

He was a F1C [fireman first class] in the U.S. Navy during World War I, onboard the USS MINNEAPOLIS. Neil Anderson writes,

"I have Clarence Almon’s enlistment and discharge papers, and I have his old 10” x 16” framed picture of his Navy ship, as well as his old trunk he had while on that ship. C A Hissam enlisted 12-11-1917 in Parkersburg WV. He was assigned to the USS Minneapolis C-13/CA-17, Columbia Class Cruiser, which was re-commissioned for WWI in July 1917, and escorted convoys in the North Atlantic. The Columbia Class had powerful engines that were expensive to operate. After WWI ended, she was assigned to San Diego and patrolled the Sandwich Islands, now known as Hawaii while C A Hissam was aboard. Unfortunately, they never got to leave the ship in Hawaii. C A Hissam was discharged 06-28-1919 from St Louis MO processing station. He was indeed a Fireman 1st Class upon discharge. The Minneapolis C-13 represented the US at the coronation of Czar Nicholas in Russia, participated in scientific and training missions and welcomed home the squadron bringing the body of John Paul Jones back to Annapolis in 1906. I have attached the picture granddaddy had hanging on his wall, with the “Dazzle” camouflage paint it had in 1918 when C A Hissam served on her."

A fireman in the Navy works down in the engine room, in essence servicing the fires in the boiler. This is hot, and sometimes dangerous duty. A steam leak can scald a man to death and breathing live steam can sear your lungs, making it impossible to breath. Note too that C-13 was an old coal-burning ship. The men that shoveled coal for her were known as the black gang because they could never get clean of the coal dust.

USS MINNEAPOLIS C-13

A COLUMBIA-class protectd cruiser. It was laid down in 1891 and launched in 1893. She was decommissioned in Philadelphia in 1906, but recommissioned in July 1917 upon the outbreak of World War I. "Minneapolis got underway from Philadelphia 15 September for Hampton Roads, and departed that base 26 October for Colon, Panama Canal Zone, were she joined British transports ARAWA and CORINTHIA. The vessels sailed from Colon 6 November and steamed by way of Hampton Roads to Halifax, Nova Scotia. The cruiser continued to operate along the Atlantic coast until assigned to transatlantic convoy duty 24 February 1918. During the next 8 months, she made four escort voyages, departing New York and sailing to ocean rendezvous where the convoys were turned over to British destroyers. On her last voyage, she departed New York on 9 October as escort for a convoy to Sydney, Nova Scotia, and returned to New York, 19 October.

In the 1920 census for Buffalo, Clay county, West Virginia as C. A. Hissam, a 24 year old living with his father-in-law. He was a pumper on the railroad. His wife was Bessie, 27.

Clarence moved his family to Kentucky in about 1928.

In the 1930 census of Ashland, Boyd county, Kenucky as Clarence E. Hissam, a 32 year old electrician at the steel plant. Living with him were his wife, Bessie E., 37, and children, Clarence W., 9, Helen L., 8, Perry D., 5, Mary V., 4/12, and her twin, Amos F., 4/12. All were from West Virginia, except the last two who were born in Kentucky. A cousin, Emma Hambrick was living with them.


Clarence Almon Hissam with his old pickup truck, with what appears to possibly be a 1937 plate, making him about 41 at the time.

Neil Anderson: "When Clarence Almon and Bessie lived in Ashland KY, C A Hissam always bought the latest things for Bessie, whether a refrigerator, radio or cook pot. When his mother Isa Hissam came to visit, she would just take these things home with her if she liked them, and C A Hissam would have to go buy another of the same item. Clarence Almon bought one of the first TV’s in the neighborhood, and neighbors would come over to watch TV. She actually took the refrigerator once. She would also drag furniture and other items out of the house and throw them down the stream bank into Elk River, which was only a few feet deep and more like a stream, and make her husband or son or family buy her new things to replace what she threw out."

Clarence died on 27 December 1965 in Ashland, Boyd county, Kentucky at the age of 86 and was sent home to be buried in Clay county, West Virginia. Bessie died on 20 July 1990. Their children were,
(26) Clarence Whitman Hissam (1921)
(26) Helen Louise Hissam (1922)
(26) Perry Delaney Hissam (1924)
(26) Mary Virginia Hissam (1929)
(26) Amos Franklin Hissam (1929)

(26) Clarence Whitman Hissam (1921)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) David Franklin Hissam (1853) (25) Clarence Almon Hissam (1896)

In the 1930 census of Ashland, Boyd county, Kenucky as Clarence W. Hissam, 9, born in Virginia. He married Vera June Holbrook and had a single child, Susan. Second he married Marie Louise Gossett. A descendant, Neil B. Anderson, wrote,

"Also Steve, with you being a navy man, I thought you would be particularly interested to know that (25) Clarence Almon’s son, (26) Clarence Whitman Hissam, was a pilot in the Army Air Corps and a sergeant with the Flying Tigers in China during WW II. He once told me a story about there not being much good food to eat while he was in China, being tired of the same rations all the time. He said they would go hunting and shoot ducks to cook and eat. They didn’t have any dogs, so they gave Chinese boys chocolate bars from their rations to be their retrievers, sending them into the ponds and lakes to bring back the ducks they shot down. Uncle Clarence was quite a character with an ornery/mischievous streak some times. He owned an airplane when he came home after the war. He took his mother Bessie flying one time, and did loops and dives until she got sick and threw up. She would have been in her mid 50’s at the time."

"I have been doing a little research on the Flying Tigers, and Clarence Whitman Hissam isn’t an original member of the first 3 squadrons which only had about 20 planes. Since I didn’t find his name in the rosters of the original 3 Flying Tiger AVG squadrons, It means he must have been in the successor group, China Air Task Force (CATF), which later became the 14th Air Force. Gen Chenault continued to call these successor groups Flying Tigers as well, which annoyed the original Flying Tigers to some degree, although a few original members signed up with the CATF and continued in the China theater. The successor groups were officially US entities, namely US Army Air Corps CATF and then the US 14th Air Force, while the original group was part of the Chinese Air Force, furnished by a private military contractor prior to the US entry into WWII, under the supervision of Clair Chenault. Chenault was a retired Army Air Corps officer who had been working in China since 1937 as a military advisor and then director of China Air Force flightschool. Of course FDR privately approved the clandestine group and members of his administration worked to help set it up. I have found CATF unit histories but not rosters, so I am at a standstill until I get Clarence’s service records and see what actual unit he was in, and when."
Below are some of Clarence's military patches.


"The shoulder patch I Identified as 3rd Army Air Force, which originated in FL as a training corps for fighter and bomber pilots, and it’s personnel were later dispersed around the world to fight as the US progressed further into WWII. The second patch is a squadron patch that I looked online for all day and never found anything on it. I understand from reading, that people in theater sometimes made up their own patches that were never approved, and so are not listed as officially accepted patches by the Air Force. I don’t know if this is one of those instances or not, but I would have thought some site would have all patches, official or not." - Neil Anderson

Clarence W. Hissam's plane (which looks like an Aeronca Champ to me).

More from Neil Anderson:

I finally received the military file for Clarence W. Hissam covering his service for WW II, as well as doing some further research on Clyde E Davis’s service, 2nd husband of Helen Hissam. The following explains things pretty well but you may be able to add something given your military background.

Clyde Davis add’l WW II info:

The pictures of the patches for AAF 3rd Air Corps and squadron I previously sent to you belong to Clyde Davis. The 404th Fighter-Bomber Group was reassigned from 3RD Army Air Corps to 9th Army Air Corps and sent to England in March 1944. The three fighter squadrons 506th, 507th and 508th flew P-47’s; replacing the RAF 620th,621st and 622nd. The 506th Bombardment Squadron flew B-24’s. The 404th Group initially flew against targets in France in preparation for the Normandy invasion, and provided top cover during the Normandy invasion. After the invasion, 404th Group moved its base of operations to France to operate and also flew a few missions in North Africa. Clyde Davis was also a bombardier, in addition to being a crew chief and staff sergeant, while earning a bronze star. While most bombardiers were officers who didn’t make it into the pilot corps, there were almost 600 enlisted men trained as bombardiers during WW II, among the more than 45,000 bombardiers trained during the war. The latest technology being used at that time was the Norden Bombsight and Auto Pilot System, and servicemen selected to operate or maintain the bombsight system had to take an oath of secrecy before joining training. In the event of a crash in enemy territory, the bombsight was to be destroyed by a thermite gun installed on the plane, to keep it out of enemy hands. While Clyde was classified as a crew chief, he could also substitute as a bombardier. Noncommissioned officers and their staff who repaired auto pilot and bombsight systems were probably the most skilled and secretive positions in the depot. The Norden bombsight systems were actually removed and carried off the bomber in a case after each flight and stored securely at a single location on the base. The 404th Group returned to the states in 1945 after helping dismantle the German air force and aircraft industry, following Germany’s surrender. The 404th group was preparing to be sent to the Pacific theater next, but once Japan surrendered, the unit was deactivated in Nov 1945 and its members eventually discharged.

Clarence W Hissam in WW II:

Clarence W Hissam attended Ashland Community College for one semester after finishing high school Spring 1939, majoring in chemistry. He then gained employment at American Rolling Mill in 1940, which later became ARMCO Steel and AK Steel. Starting as a laborer, he quickly moved up to diesel locomotive operator, moving and dumping tipples until he enlisted in Oct 1942. Clarence enlisted at the Huntington WV enlistment office, and then reported to processing in New Jersey, where recruits were tested, evaluated and assigned. Hissam’s have always been technically inclined and based on test scores and aptitude tests, Clarence was assigned to airplane mechanic school in New Jersey. He must have done well there because he was then sent to Goldsboro NC as a student for additional training to become an instructor. Following his additional training, Clarence became an instructor and corporal at Johnson Field in NC from Mar 1943 to Feb 1944. From that point forward his character and efficiency ratings were always rated “excellent”. He once again took additional training in airplane instruments and bomb mechanics, and became an instructor for repairing Auto Pilot and Bombsight Systems at Keesler Field in MS, where the AAF had started a huge recruit training facility for mechanics, bombardiers and pilots/navigators. Technicians would have to pledge the same oath of secrecy as bombardiers, and protect the bombsight technology with their life. Clarence was attached to the 1st Academic Squadron as a technical instructor for several months before being assigned to overseas processing. By 1944, substantial numbers of recruits had been trained in all disciplines and women mechanics and civilian instructors were being brought in to replace the service men being shipped overseas. Clarence qualified as a sharpshooter with the M-1 Carbine, no doubt due to growing up hunting in Ivydale, WV as a boy and also spending 3 years in Junior ROTC in high school. That explains why he was able to shoot down ducks to eat in China. He failed miserably with the 45 pistol however and didn’t qualify with it, scoring only 52.

When Clarence enlisted, he was 5’ 10” but only weighed 121 pounds, which was noted as a deficiency on his physical, but it was noted the condition could be remedied with proper diet and physical conditioning. However, when he was assigned for overseas duty in 1944 and reported to processing in Mississippi, he was disqualified from combat duty for being 4 pounds underweight. After 2 months and presumably a lot of eating, Clarence was cleared for overseas combat duty. By the time he was discharged in 1946, he would weigh 140 pounds.

He was put on a ship which took a month to get to Bombay India on Oct 7, 1944, although at the time they would not have been told their destination prior to leaving. After several weeks in India, Clarence was assigned in Nov 1944 to the 25th Fighter Squadron, 51st Fighter Group in Kunming, China, known as the “Fightin Draggins” Squadron. The 25th Fighter Squadron sailed to Karachi, India in January, 1942 aboard the USS President Coolidge and encountered more combat activity than any other unit in the 51st fighter Group during the war. The 51st Fighter-Bomber Group as a whole were known as “The Flying Tigers” flying P-40’s and P-51’s by 1945, as well as heavy bombers. [At right is a photograph of Curtiss P-40N Warhawks of the 25th Fighter Squadron in Paoshan, China, circa late-1944. The 25th is an active squadron today, flying the A-10 Warthog. The squadron's nickname is said to be the "Assam Draggin's", for their duty in that region - ah, those Air Force wits.]

Not long after arriving in Kunming, Clarence was involved in a crash in Nov 1944 while taxiing down a field. He was thrown from a plane, sustaining a fractured ankle and head injury. [He may have been standing on the wing at the time of the incident, a familiar position for mechanics, allowing them to better listen to the engine as it was revved.] Presumably that didn’t keep him from his duties as a mechanic for auto pilot and bombsight systems and there is no mention of medical leave. Technicians often flew with pilots testing and repairing systems and could fill in as a bombardier if required. Navigators, bombardiers and technicians completed pre-flight and basic flight training, because they had to have a basic understanding how planes worked, and how the auto pilot system integrated with the plane. [I've not heard of this before, but it makes sense based on their remote location and the probable scaricity of rated pilots.] Only pilots continued on to intermediate and advanced flight training, becoming officers and pilots. Whether Clarence received additional training because he was an technical instructor, or just trained on his own having a natural aptitude for flying, no flight training is noted in his file and he only rose to the rank of Staff Sergeant. What we know for sure is, he came home as a pilot following the war and bought his own plane and flew recreationally.


P-40 of the 25th Fighter Squadron. Note the "dragon's leer" vice the usual tiger mouth.

After 8 months, Clarence was next assigned to the 16th Fighter Squadron, 51st Group, known as the “Tomahawks”, in Hsusien, China. He was only with the 16th for a month before joining the 528th Fighter Squadron, 311th Fighter Group, known as the “Dragon Fly’s” in Shanghai, China, who were previously based in Nawadth, India. [They flew P-51's out of Shwangliu. They were one of the few units to use the A-36, the dive bomber version of the Mustang.] He became a Staff Sergeant at this point and stayed with this group until the end of his service in 1946. [The 528th was inactivated on 6 January 1946. Apparently at the end of the war their aircraft were given to China to equip their Air Force.] The fighter planes in China had been rigged to carry a single 1000 pound bomb, in addition to their guns, and performed dive bombing runs in addition to strafing targets. The fighter groups also contained complementary bomber groups, which they accompanied on missions. When a bomber got close to its target, the bombardier took over control of the plane with the auto pilot and bombsight system. He had absolute control of the plane until he called “bombs away”, at which time the pilot retook control of the plane.

Clarence W Hissam received the Asia Pacific Battle Ribbon with 3 bronze stars, one for each of the 3 big campaigns in the Asia Pacific Theater. They were 1) The China Defensive Campaign 2) The Central Burma Campaign and 3) The General Pacific/China Offensive Campaign. Clarence always claimed one of his planes was named the “Janet Sue” after his niece, the daughter of his sister Helen Hissam Prichard. He processed out through Indianapolis, IN and Fort Knox, KY, returning home to Ashland, Ky and re-employment with Armco Steel until retirement, while marrying and having a daughter Susan with his 1st wife June, and eventually selling the plane he bought after returning home from the service.

Clarence W. Hissam died in 2003 at the age of 82.

(27) Susan Karen Hisssam, who married Tom Greene

(26) Helen Louise Hissam (1922)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) David Franklin Hissam (1853) (25) Clarence Almon Hissam (1896)

She was born on 3 March 1922. In the 1930 census of Ashland, Boyd county, Kenucky as Helen L. Hissam, 8, born in Virginia. A descendant, Neil B. Anderson, wrote recently,

"She married 1) Lowell Emerson Prichard 10-05-1940, having one daughter, Janet Sue Prichard, b 1941. Helen and Lowell were divorced by the end of 1941. My mother Janet Sue Prichard was raised by her grandparents in her youth, sharing a room with (26) Mary Virginia Hissam who was like a sister to her, before eventually going to live in her preteens with her Mother Helen and Helen’s 2nd husband Clyde Elmer Davis m 7-26-1946, as well as having a half sister Rebecca Neal Davis from marriage 2. Janet married Frank M Anderson, my father. Rebecca Davis married Albert Gehringer."

"Clarification for (27) Janet Sue Prichard. She lived with her grandparents (C A and Bessie Hissam) from the time she was born until the sixth Grade, as did her mother, (26) Helen Louise Hissam, before moving out on her own. For four years during the sixth through ninth grades, she lived with her mother, Helen Louise Davis and husband Clyde Davis. Janet then moved back to live with her grandparents in 10th and 11th grade until marrying at age 17 to Frank Mumford Anderson, my father. Apparently Helen Louise and Lowell Prichard had separated by the time Helen brought Janet home from the hospital."

"Clyde Elmer Davis served as crew chief and Staff sergeant for 506th Fighter Squadron, 404th Fighter Group in the Army Air Corps in France in WWII, receiving a bronze star, before coming home and marrying Helen in 1946, after the war. Clyde was a long time postal service employee and high school football referee in Ashland, KY. After retiring from the postal service, Clyde worked as office deputy for the Boyd County Sheriff Dept, running the administrative/office operations after another friend was elected Sheriff, and then for long-time friends at Jay Loan pawnshop, and also as an insurance adjuster."
She died on 24 September 1991.

(26) Perry Delaney Hissam (1924)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) David Franklin Hissam (1853) (25) Clarence Almon Hissam (1896)

He was born on 14 May 1924. In the 1930 census of Ashland, Boyd county, Kenucky as Perry D. Hissam, 5, born in Virginia. He died on 5 January 1977 at the age of 52 in Ashland, Boyd county, Kentucky and was sent back to be buried with his father and grandfather in a Clay county, West Virginia cemetary.

(26) Mary Virginia Hissam (1929)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) David Franklin Hissam (1853) (25) Clarence Almon Hissam (1896)

She was born on 9 November 1929 in Boyd county, Kentucky. In the 1930 census of Ashland, Boyd county, Kenucky as Mary V. Hissam, 4/12, born in Kentucky. She married Roger Lee Hooper.

(26) Amos Franklin Hissam (1929)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) David Franklin Hissam (1853) (25) Clarence Almon Hissam (1896)

He was born on 9 November 1929 in Boyd county, Kentucky. His mother was noted to be "Bessie' Friend." In the 1930 census of Ashland, Boyd county, Kenucky as Amos F. Hissam, 4/12, born in Kentucky. A relative, Neil B. Anderson, recently wrote,

"Under (25) Clarence Almon Hissam, the last child listed, a male twin brother of Mary Virginia, has a given name of Amos Franklin Hissam per the family bible, born 1929, but he has always gone by Frank. He is the father of Andrew Hissam, b1964. The first child listed, (26) Frank Amos Hissam is a duplicate with no date and should be removed. The second child listed is Ernest Lee Hissam (actually Douglas) and should be moved and corrected per the explanation in item 1 above."

"Amos Franklin served in the army during the Korean War. He was severely wounded and spent many months in the hospital, before being discharged to continue his lengthy rehabilitation back home."

(27) Robin Hissam (c1960)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) David Franklin Hissam (1853) (25) Clarence Almon Hissam (1896) (26) Amos Franklin Hissam (1929)

(27) David Andrew Hissam (1964)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) David Franklin Hissam (1853) (25) Clarence Almon Hissam (1896) (26) Amos Franklin Hissam (1929)

He was born on 19 May 1964 in Ashland, Kentucky. "I now live in Huntsville, AL with my wife Deborah (m.n. Deborah Jane Kelly) and daughter Melaina Zara Hissam, b. 2/10/97. We moved here in 1991 after I took a job with NASA. I am currently working on the Crew Launch Vehicle, the replacement to the Space Shuttle and the vehicle that will hopefully take us back to the moon."

My wife stays very busy teaching drama and other classes to local home schoolers. My daughter is in the 3th grade and is growing like a weed. We have lots of interests including bicycling, piano, camping, and climbing. We recently completed a climbing wall in the back yard.

(25) Ernest Lee Hissam (1896)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Abner Hissam (1818) (24) David Franklin Hissam (1853)

Clarence Almon's twin, he Was born on 22 May 1896 in Milton, West Virginia. In the 1900 census of Clay county, West Virginia as Ernest L. Hissam, 4 [May 1896]. He died on 4 January 1908 and was buried in a Clay county, West Virginia cemetary. A descendant, Neil B. Anderson, wrote,

"Granddaddy (25) Clarence Almon told her [Neil's mother] that his twin died of spinal meningitis."

(23) John Heysham (1822)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

John may be a son of Thomas.

In the 1830 census of Tyler county we have, in the household of Thomas Hisam of Thomas, 2 boys who were 10-15 years old. These were probably John and Abner, who would have been 8 and 12.

He was buried, as John Heysham, in the Little, Tyler county cemetery. Note that Thomas' sons Elijah and Abner also used the Heysham surname at times from 1840 through 1860.

John's tombstone indicates that he died on 12 September 1853 at the age of 31 years, 6 months, that is he was born in in about 1822, just where there is room in the birth order.

(23) William Hissam (1824)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

He was born in about 1824 in Tyler county, West Virginia and died in 1907. I think he married Elizabeth Weekly, who was born in 1834 in Tyler county and died in 1906 [?]. William and Elizabeth were living on their own in 1850 in Tyler county.

The 1850 Federal census has William living in District 61, Tyler county. His age is also right for their marriage in 1815. He was a farmer, born in Virginia, aged 24, his wife was Elizabeth, aged 16. The Shook family, into which his sister married, lived nearby.

In the 1860 census of Tyler county I have a William Hisam, a 36 year old farmer living with a wife, Elizabeth, aged 26. Their children were Elijah, 8, Samantha, 6, and Margaret, aged 1. William spent all of his life as an industrious farmer and was one of the respected members of his community.

In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Tyler county as William Hissem, a 45 year old laborer. Living with him were his wife, Elizabeth, 36, Elijah, 19, Samantha, 16, Margaret, 10, Harvey, 7, and Samuel, 5.

Elizabeth died at some point between 1870 and 1874. William then married Frances Maulson [Malson] on 18 November 1874. She may be the daughter of James and Susanna Maulson [Malson], and was born in 1847 in Virginia. She was in the 1860 and 1870 Tyler county census, living with her parents. This does not jibe with the 1880 census, below, which would indicate a birth date no later than 1838.

In the 1880 census for Lincoln township, Tyler county, West Virginia as William Hissam, a 54 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Frances, 42. The line-up of his children was interesting. Normally they are shown in descending order, by age. William's are all jumbled up. His children were Adeline, 13, Flora B., 5, and Thomas, 2, and then Samantha, 24, with grandchildren, Henry C., 8, Sarah F., 6, Eliza F., 4, and then back to William's children, Harvey B., 18, and Samuel J. 14. I think what this means is that Adeline, Flora and Thomas make up a separate group, that is they are the children of [or related to] Frances. The next group of children are those of William's previous wife, Elizabeth. The grandchildren, grouped under Samantha's name, are her children. Note, however, that Samantha was specifically designated as single, as were none of her siblings, not widowed or divorced.

I further believe that Adeline, who was too old to be William's legitimate daughter by Frances, was not his daughter or that of Frances, but her younger sister. The 1870 census of Lincoln township lists, in the household of James and Susan Maulson, a daughter, Frances, 23 [1847], and a daughter, Adaline, 2 [1868]. Note that the Adeline of 1880 could not be Frances' daughter since Frances was still single, and had no children, at that time. This all means that Adeline and the grandchildren do not really have a Hissam surname.

Also note from the 1880 census that David Hissam (1794), who kept a toll gate, and his wife, Elizabeth, lived nearby. He was an uncle.

Frances died sometime before the 1900 census. Note, there is yet another issue here. The contention is that Frances did not die until after the 1900 census, where she can be found, a mother-in-law, living with her daughter, Rosa D. Banne, and her husband, Jackson, in Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia.

Banne, Jackson, head, b: Oct 1876, age 23, married 2 years, b: PA; occ: oil field laborer
____, Rosa D., wife, b: Jun 1880, age 19, married 2 years, 0 children; b: WV
Hissam, Frances, mother-in-law, born Aug 1847, age 52, Married, 6 children/5 surviving, born in West Virginia, Father born in Ohio, Mother born in West Virginia.
The contention is that Rosa, a previously unknown child of William, was born after the date of the 1880 census, 7 June, because she was not shown in that census, but before the end of the month, because the 1900 census shows her born in June 1880. This may well be, but why wasn't Frances living with her husband in the 1900 census, below? She was shown, afterall, as Married. Note that the census for William, below, indicated to the contrary that William was "D," that is, divorced. This would be a fairly rare occurence at that time, though not unknown. Also note that Frances' father was shown as born in Ohio in the 1880 census, when the 1860 census shows him born in Virginia and the 1870 census shows him born in Pennsylvania.

In the 1900 census of Lincoln township as William Hissam, a 75 year old divorced man. He was living with his son, Harvey, and his family.

William died in 1907. His children with Elizabeth were,
(24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852)
(24) Samantha Hissam (1854)
(24) Margaret Hissam (1859)
(24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862)
(24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)

Probably the sister of Francis Maulson Hissam,
(24) Adeline Hissam (1867)

William's children with Francis were,
(24) Flora Belle Hissam (1875)
(24) Thomas Hissam (1879)
(24) Rosa D. Hissam (1880)

(24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824)

He was born in August 1852. In the 1860 census of Tyler county as Elijah Hisam, 8. In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Tyler county as Elijah Hissem, 19, still living at home with his parents, William and Elizabeth.

Elijah Hissam married Sarah E. Porter on 3 November 1870 in Tyler county, West Virginia.

In the 1880 census of the Reedy district, Wirt county, West Virginia as Eliga Hisam [sic], a 29 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Sarah E., 32, and children, Nancy A., 11, M. E. [a daughter], 9, Thornton W., 7, Milton L., 5, and Francis H., 2 [a son].

In the 1900 census of Union district, Wood county, West Virginia as Elijah C. Hisam, 47, born in August 1852, of West Virginia, with no occupation. Living with him was his wife, Sarah E., 53, born in September 1846, of Ohio, and children Laura F., 16, born in June 1884, and Robert W., 12, born in May 1888, both of West Virginia. Elijah and Sarah had been married for 28 years [shouldn't it be 30?].

In the 1910 census of Moon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania as Eliza [sic] Hissam, a 58 year old farm laborer "working out," of West Virginia. Living with him were his wife, Sarah E., 63, of Ohio, and grand-son, Edward C., 12, of Virginia. Since I don't otherwise have a grand-son of this name, this may be an illegitimate son of one of Elijah's daughters. Milton and Robert W. Hissem were also living in this area.

Elijah died at Coraopolis, Pennsylvania in 1919 at the age of 63 [sic]. Coraopolis is northwest of Pittsburgh, on the Ohio river. Note that his sons, Thornton and Milton, were living in this area by this time as well.

His children were,
(25) Nancy A. Hissam (1869)
(25) M. E. Hissam (1871)
(25) Thornton William Alvadore Hissam (1873)
(25) Milton L. Hissam (1875)
(25) Francis H. Hissam (1878)
(25) Laura F. Hissam (1884)
(25) Robert W. Hissam (1888)

(25) Nancy A. Hissam (1869)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852)

In the 1880 census of the Reedy district, Wirt county, West Virginia as Nancy A. Hisam, 11.

(25) M. E. Hissam (1871)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852)

In the 1880 census of the Reedy district, Wirt county, West Virginia as M. E. Hisam [a daughter], 9.

(25) Thornton William Alvadore Hissam (1873)
(15) Raphe Hesome (c1550) (16) William Hesome (c1577) (17) George Hesom (c1600) (18) John Heesom (1650) (19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852)

His nickname appears to have been Dode. He was born in March 1873 in Tyler county, West Virginia.

In the 1880 census of the Reedy district, Wirt county, West Virginia as Thornton W. Hisam, 7, the son of Eliza and Sarah E. Hisam. Eliza was born in Ohio.

Thornton A. Hissam married Rosa A. Lightner on 4 May 1895 in Wetzel county, West Virginia.

In the 1900 census . . . His father was in Wood county, West Virginia at this time, so I suspect Thornton was as well.

In the 1910 census of Moon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania as Thornton W. Hissam [Hesson in Ancestry.com], 61 [should be 37], a molder in a steel factory. His brother, Milton, had a similar same job. Thornston was from West Virginia. While he was shown as married, no wife was listed. Living with him, in addition to two servants, were a son-in-law, Richard W. Bray, 49, and his daughter, Ella J. Bray, 37, of Pennsylvania, and their children. The man I think was his brother, Robert W. Hissam, was living next door.

Thornton William Hissam, of RFD 3, Coraopolis, Allegheny county, Pennsylvanka, registered for the draft on 12 September 1918 in Elizabeth, Wirt county, West Virginia at the age of 45. He was a coal miner for the Canaanville Coal Company of Canaanville, Athens county, Ohio. This is in southeastern Ohio, just north of Meigs county, on the Ohio river. Note, the Canaanville Coal Company began operating the first deep-shaft coal mine in Ohio around the turn of the last century. Interestingly he listed his mother, Sarah E. Hissam, vice his wife as his nearest relative. Had Rosa died/been divorced? He also listed a temporary address of Palestine, West Virginia. He was described as short and slender, with gray eyes and brown hair.

In the 1920 census . . . His father had died in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania in 1919.

William Alvadore Hissam [Dode Hissum], 45, married Elma Mae Lockhart (1898-1964), 22, the daughter of Harry Lockhart (c1875) and Corda Viola Lockhart (1877), on 12 August 1920 in Parkersburg, Wood county, West Virginia. Both were of Wirt county.

In the 1930 census of Tygart, Wood county, West Virginia as Thornton Hissam, a 57 year old laborer. He was a roomer in the house of Columbus Lockhart, 29. He was divorced and had first married at the age of 48 [1919], but that doesn't seem right. Perhaps he meant last married. I show that Columbus Isaiah Lockhart, born 22 June 1900, was the son of General Harrison (Harry) Lockhart and Corda Viola Lockhart, that is, he was Elma's brother.

Thornton was not living with his wife. In the 1930 census of Parkersburg, Wood county, West Virginia as Elma Hissam, a 30 year old cook in a hotel. Living with her were her children, Forest, 10, Alvadore, 8, Robert, 5, and Viola, 3 1/2. Elma had been married at the age of 18, and was still shown as married, though her husband was not listed.

Thornton William Hissam, the son of Elijah Hissam and Sarah Porter, both of Tyler county, died of arterio schlerosis on 25 May 1938, at the age of 65, in Wirt county, West Virginia - from West Virginia Deaths.

The children of Thornton and Rosa were,
(26) Ella J. Hissam, she married Richard W. Bray [?]

The children of Thornton and Sarah were,
(26) Forest Hissam (1920), he must have died young
(26) Alvadore Hissam (1922)
(26) Robert Hughie Hissam (1925)
(26) Viola Hissam (c1927), married Harold Ankrom. Children: Patricia Ankrom m. Dwight Gault Nov 19 1966, Gerald Ankrom b. Mar 10 1947 m. Mary Alton
(26) Reba Hissam (1932), born 1 June 1932, died 26 June 1966, married Gary Kesterson 3 December 1950
(26) Ruby Irene Hissam (1934), born 6 August 1934, married Harold Montgomery 19 December 1951. Children: Harold William Montgomery Jr b. Mar 4 1953

(26) Alvadore Hissam (1922)
(15) Raphe Hesome (c1550) (16) William Hesome (c1577) (17) George Hesom (c1600) (18) John Heesom (1650) (19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852) (25) Thornton William Alvadore Hissam (1873)

Alvadore was born on 4 May 1922. He married Mildred V. Hill. A descendent, Bret J. Hissam writes,

"Alvadore Hissam (Hissum) is my grandfather and Mildred V. Hill (Hissam) is my grandmother. Their children are Bruce (my Father) and Shirley Hissam. I do not know Dode Hissum, but according to my grandmother and my informal research, Alvadore's Father was Thornton William Alvadore Hissam. Apparently, he and Elma were separated during the 1930 census but he was living with some of the Lockhart family."

Alvadore's chidren were,
(27) Bruce Hissam (c1948)
(27) Shirley Hissam

(27) Bruce Hissam (c1948)
(15) Raphe Hesome (c1550) (16) William Hesome (c1577) (17) George Hesom (c1600) (18) John Heesom (1650) (19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852) (25) Thornton William Alvadore Hissam (1873) (26) Alvadore Hissam (1922)

Of Parkersburg, West Virginia. The father of,
(28) Major Brett James Hissam (c1969), USA, Fort Monroe, Virginia. Parkersburg South High School 1987. BS Business Administration, West Virginia University. MS Technology and Information Technology, Georgia Southern University.

(26) Robert Hughie Hissam (1925)
(15) Raphe Hesome (c1550) (16) William Hesome (c1577) (17) George Hesom (c1600) (18) John Heesom (1650) (19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852) (25) Thornton William Alvadore Hissam (1873)

He was born on 30 June 1925 or he was the Robert H. Hissam who was born on 31 July 1925 and died on 27 September 1990, at age 65, in Virginia Beach, Virginia - per the Social Security Death Index.

Robert H. Hissam was in the U.S. Navy during World War II, enlisting on 17 September 1942. He served on the USS BELLEAU WOOD CVL-24, a Light Carrier, in the Air Department, reporting aboard on 22 December 1944 while the ship was in San Francisco for an overhaul. He remained onboard until at least 1946. The Air Department works one of the most dangerous jobs in the world, launching aircraft from the carrier's flight deck. Robert was an S1c [Seaman 1st Class] in the V-6 division.

Robert was released from duty on 20 February 1946.

USS BELLEAU WOOD

"After a brief shakedown cruise, Belleau Wood reported to the Pacific Fleet, arriving at Pearl Harbor 26 July 1943. After supporting the occupation of Baker Island and taking part in the Tarawa and Wake Island raids, she joined TF 50 for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands.

Belleau Wood operated with TF 58 during the seizure of Kwajalein and Majuro Atolls, Marshall Islands, Truk raid; Saipan-Tinian-Rota-Guam raids; Palau-Yap-Ulithi-Woleai raid; Sawar and Wakde Island raids in support of the landings at Hollandia (currently known as Jayapura), New Guinea; Truk-Satawan-Ponape raid; occupation of Saipan, 1st Bonins raid, Battle of the Philippine Sea; and 2nd Bonins raid. During the Battle Of the Philippine Sea, Belleau Wood's planes sank the Japanese carrier Hiyo.

After an overhaul at Pearl Harbor Belleau Wood rejoined TF 58 for the last stages of the occupation of Guam. She joined TF 38 and took part in the strikes in support of the occupation of the southern Palaus; Philippine Islands raids; Morotai landings; Okinawa raid; northern Luzon and Formosa raids; Luzon strikes, and the Battle of Cape Engano. On 30 October, while Belleau Wood was patrolling with her task group east of Leyte, she shot down a Japanese suicide plane which fell on her flight deck aft, causing fires which set off ammunition. Before the fire could be brought under control, 92 men had either died or gone missing.

After temporary repairs at Ulithi, Belleau Wood steamed to Hunters Point, California, for permanent repairs and an overhaul, arriving 29 November 1944. [Robert Hissam reported onboard during this layover] She departed San Francisco Bay 20 January 1945 and joined TF 58 at Ulithi on 7 February. During 15 February – 4 March she took part in the raids on Honshu Island, Japan, and the Nansei Shoto, as well as supporting the landings on Iwo Jima. She also took part in the 5th Fleet strikes against Japan (17 March – 26 May) and the 3rd Fleet strikes (27 May – 11 June). After embarking Air Group 31 at Leyte (13 June – 1 July), she rejoined the 3rd Fleet for the final strikes against the Japanese home islands (10 July – 15 August). The last Japanese aircraft shot down in the war was a "Judy" dive bomber which was shot down by Clarence "Bill" A. Moore, an F6F pilot of "The Flying Meat-Axe" VF-31 from USS Belleau Wood.

Belleau Wood launched her planes 2 September for the mass flight over Tokyo, Japan, during the surrender ceremonies. She remained in Japanese waters until 13 October. Arriving at Pearl Harbor 28 October, she departed three days later with 1248 servicemen for San Diego. She remained on "Magic Carpet" duty, returning servicemen from Guam and Saipan to San Diego, until 31 January 1946. During the next year Belleau Wood was moored at various docks in the San Francisco area, undergoing inactivation. She was placed out of commission in reserve at Alameda Naval Air Station 13 January 1947."

- from Wikipedia

Robert enlisted in the Navy again on 4 December 1947. He was on the RANDOLPH CVA-15 in 1959 in Attack Squadron Seventy Five (VA-75), the "Sunday Punchers." The squadron was flying the AD-6 Skyraider out of NAS Oceana, in Virginia Beach, Virginia. USS RANOLPH cruised in the Mediterranean from September 1958 to March 1959.

Robert retired from the Navy on 11 July 1972.

He married Virginia Arlene Frye in 1953 in Wirt, Marshall county, West Virginia.

Robert Hissam died on 27 September 1990 in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

(25) Milton Losson Hissam (1875)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852)

He was born in July 1875. In the 1880 census of the Reedy district, Wirt county, West Virginia as Milton L. Hisam, 5.

Milton L. Hissam married Mary A. Moore, of Ohio, on 9 February 1898 in Tyler county, West Virginia. He was 21 and Mary was 16. Soon thereafter they moved to Ohio.

In the 1900 census of East Liverpool, Columbiana county, Ohio as Milton L. Hissam, a 24 year old miner. Living with him were his wife, Mary A., 20 [August 1879], and daughter, Francis, 1 [November 1898].

He clearly was not satisfied in Ohio because by 1904 Milton had moved his family to Pennsylvania where he would stay.

In the 1910 census of Moon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania as Milton L. Hissam, a 34 year old molder in a steel foundry. Living with him were his wife, Mary A., 25, and children, Francis, 12, and Zelma M., 8, both born in Ohio, and Anna R., 6, and Harold M., 1, both born in Pennsylvania. Also in the township were Eliza Hissam, Milton's dad, and Robert W. Hissam and his family, perhaps Milton's younger brother.

Milton Losson Hissam, residing in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, registered for the draft in 1918.

In the 1920 census of Moon township as Milton L. Hissam [Milton N. Hissom in Ancestry.com], a 45 year old coal miner. Living with him were his wife, Mary A., 38, and children, Francis E., 21, Zelma, 19, Annie R., 17, and Harold M. [H in Ancestry.com], 12.

In the 1930 census of Moon township as Milton Hissam, a 54 year old common laborer. Living with him were his wife, Mary, 48, and his son, Harold, a 22 year old electric lineman.

Milton died tragically. The Clearfield Progress, a newspaper of Clearfield, Pennsylvania, reported on 23 April 1948 from Coraopolis that,

"One man was believed killed in an $80,000 fire which swept the four room Carnot rural school three miles west of here yesterday. Milton Hissom, 72, janitor of the school, was missing and may have perished in the flames. The fire broke out, apparently in the basement, just after the school's 135 pupils, 6 to 10 years old, and the four teachers had left the building. Teachers said the janitor rushed into the building with a bucket of water. He was not seen to reappear."
His children were,
(26) Francis D. Hissam (1897)
(26) Frances E. Hissam (1898)
(26) Zelma M. Hissam (1902)
(26) Annie R. Hissam (1904)
(26) Harold M. Hissam (1908)

(26) Francis D. Hissam (1897)

Of West Virginia. I put him here only because of the 1930 reference to Moon township, where so many of the Hissam's of this line congregated from 1910 to 1930. However, to be Milton's son he would have to be illegitimate.

He joined the Army and was stationed at Fort Dix, New Jersey where he met and married Marion Davis in about 1917, at the age of 20. Marion was 19 per the marriage records.

In the 1920 census of Medford, Burlington county, New Jersey as Francis D. Hissam, a 23 year old soldier stationed at Camp Dix. He was living in the house of his father-in-law, Charles E. Davis. Francis was born in West Virginia. His father was listed as born in unknown, his mother in Ohio. Francis' wife was Marion, 19 [was she growing younger, or was she really 16 at the time of her marriage?]. She was a stenographer at the camp. There were no children.

In the 1930 census of Moon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania as Francis Hissam, a 31 year old township constable. He and his father were born in West Virginia. His mother was born in Ohio. Living with him were his wife, Marion, 30, who was born in New Jersey, and children, Helen, 10, of New Jersey, and Frances [a daughter], 7, who was born in Pennsylvania. His supposed father, Milton, also lived in Moon township at this time.

(26) Frances E. Hissam (1898)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852) (25) Milton L. Hissam (1875)

She was born in November 1898. In the 1900 census of East Liverpool, Columbiana county, Ohio as Francis Hissam, 1 [November 1898]. In the 1910 census of Moon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania as Francis Hissam, 12, born in Ohio. In the 1920 census of Moon township as Francis E. Hissam, 21.

(26) Zelma M. Hissam (1902)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852) (25) Milton L. Hissam (1875)

In the 1910 census of Moon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania as Zelma M. Hissam, 8, born in Ohio. In the 1920 census of Moon township as Zelma M. Hissam, 19.

(26) Annie R. Hissam (1904)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852) (25) Milton L. Hissam (1875)

In the 1910 census of Moon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania as Anna R. Hissam, 6, born in Pennsylvania. In the 1920 census of Moon township as Annie R. Hissam, 17.

(26) Harold M. Hissam (1908)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852) (25) Milton L. Hissam (1875)

He was born on 4 July 1908. In the 1910 census of Moon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania as Harold M. Hissam, 1, born in Pennsylvania. In the 1920 census of Moon township as Harold M. Hissam, 12. In the 1930 census of Moon township as Harold, a 22 year old electric lineman, living at home with his parents. He died in August 1980 in Bridgeville, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He apparently lived in Colorado for a time, where he received his Social Security card.

(25) Francis H. Hissam (1878)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852)

In the 1880 census of the Reedy district, Wirt county, West Virginia as Francis H. Hisam [a son], 2. There is a Francis Hissam who married Maria N. Daniels on 14 March 1896 in Tyler county, West Virginia. I don't know if this is our Francis, but the dates/location aren't too far off.

(25) Robert W. Hissam (1888)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852)

In the 1900 census of Union district, Wood county, West Virginia as Robert W. Hisam, 12, born in May 1888, of West Virginia. He was living at home with his parents, Elijah C. and Sarah E. Hisam.

Robert married Anna R. in about 1906. A researcher who has posted on Findagrave.com says that Anna Harvey Simmons was the mother of Elizabeth Myrtle and William Melvin Hissam, below. Was she Anna R?

In the 1910 census of Moon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania as Robert W. Hissam, 22, of West Virginia. Living with him was his wife, Anna R., 23, and children, Elizabeth M., 4, and William M. H., 1, all of Pennsylvania. Robert and Anna had been married 4 years.

Robert died before 1920.

In the 1920 census of New Brighton, Beaver county, Pennsylvania as Anna Hissam, 32. She was the mother of Myrtle [Elizabeth M.] and William. All, plus the father, were born in Pennsylvania [sic]. Beaver county is on the far western edge of the state, in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. New Brighton is on the East Bank of the Beaver River, about two miles from its junction with the Ohio River. "New Brighton saw early prosperity with the opening of the Pennsylvania Canal in 1834. Then, in 1836 manufacturing and industries in the area began to flourish, including flour mills, carriage works, foundries, a horseshoe-nail factory, lumber and paper mills, pottery works, brick yard and quarry, and glass companies. The success of these industries was due in large part to the abundance of water to furnish power, and the close proximity of New Brighton to the Ohio River for transporting finished products."

In the 1930 census . . . Their children were,
(26) Elizabeth Myrtle Hissam (1907)
(26) William M. H. Hissam (1909)

(26) Elizabeth Myrtle Hissam (1907)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852) (25) Robert W. Hissam (1888)

Probably born in 1906. In the 1920 census of New Brighton, Beaver county, Pennsylvania. Aged 13. Her mother is Anna Hissam, 32, born in 1888. All, plus the father, born in Pennsylvania.

(26) William M. H. Hissam (1909)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Elijah C. Hissam (1852) (25) Robert W. Hissam (1888)

This may be William Melvin Hissam, who was born on 24 January 1908 in Coraopolis, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania.

In the 1910 census of Moon township, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania as William M. H. Hissam, 1, of Pennsylvania. He was living with his parents, Robert W. and Anna R. Hissam.

In the 1920 census of New Brighton, Beaver county, Pennsylvania as William Hissam, 11. His mother is Anna Hissam, 32, born in 1888. All, plus the father, were born in Pennsylvania.

In the 1930 census . . .

William Melvin Hissam died on 8 August 1960 in Wheeling, Ohio county, West Virginia and was buried in Halcyon Hills cemetery, Bethlehem, Ohio county, West Virginia..

(24) Samantha Hissam (1854)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824)

She was born in 1854. In the 1860 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Samantha Hisam, 6. In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Tyler county as Samantha Hissem, 16. In the 1880 census for Lincoln township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Samantha Hissam, 24. Just below her were three grandchildren of William Hissam, Henry C., 8, Sarah F., 6, and Eliza F., 4. These I assume are Samantha's children. Note, however, that Samantha was specifically designated as single, as were none of her siblings, not widowed or divorced.

The wife of Sam Winning, a cooper by trade, who died at Sisterville. Samantha died at East Liverpool, Ohio.

The following are probably children of Samantha's and may be Winning's.

(25) Henry C. ____ (1872) (24) Samantha Hissam (1854) [?]

A grandson of William. He was 8 years old at the time of the 1880 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county.

(25) Sarah F. ____ (1874)
(24) Samantha Hissam (1854) [?]

A grandaughter of William. She was 6 years old at the time of the 1880 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county.

(25) Eliza J. ____ (1876)
(24) Samantha Hissam (1854) [?]

A grandaughter of William. She was 4 years old at the time of the 1880 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county.

(24) Margaret Hissam (1859)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824)

She was born in 1859. In the 1860 census of Tyler county as Margaret Hisam, aged 1. In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Tyler county as Margaret Hissem, 10. She married Harvey M. Weekly, a farmer living in Ritchie county, on 19 January 1874 in Tyler WV. Could this be a cousin she married - her mother was Elizabeth Weekly? She died in 1879 in Cornwallis, Ritchie county, West Virginia.

(24) Harvey Butler Hissam (1862)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824)

He was born in January 1862. In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Tyler county as Harvey Hissem, 7. In the 1880 census for Lincoln township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Harvey B. Hissam, 18, living at home with his father and step-mother, Frances.

Harvey B. Hissem married Georgia Venham on 21 August 1890 in Tyler county, West Virginia.

In the 1900 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Harvey Hissam, a 38 year old justice of the peace. Living with him were his wife, Georgia, 32 [August 1867], and children, Hazel, 7 [March 1893], Bessie, 5 [March 1895], and Margaret, 3 [May 1897]. Also living with him was his father, William, a 75 year old widower. Georgia had 5 children, 3 of whom were living. In the Lazear cemetary of Tyler county are tombstones for Lawrence Hissam, born 15 June 1899 the "s/o H.B. & Geogia 2m 6d," and Mabel Hissam, born 24 July 1891, died 16 May 1892, "d/o H.B. & Georgia."

In the 1910 census of Sisterville, Tyler county as H.B. Hissam, a 48 year old commercial travelor for a wholesale grocery. Living with him were his wife, Georgia, 43, and children, Hazel, 17, Bess, 15, Margaret, 13, Dorothy, 9, Burton, 7, and Fred, 1 1/2.

Georgia died sometime before the 1920 census. The Lazear cemetary of Tyler county has a tombstone for Georia V. Hissam, but with no dates.

In the 1920 census of Akron, Ohio as Harvey J. [sic] Hissam, a 57 year old laborer in the rubber factory. He and his son, Fred, 11, were lodgers in the house of Sarah Betwer.

Harvey Butler Hissam died on 13 January 1941 in Summit county, Ohio.

His children were,
(25) Mabel Hissam (1891)
(25) Hazel Hissam (1893)
(25) Bessie Hissam (1895)
(25) Margaret Hissam (1897)
(25) Lawrence Hissam (1899)
(25) Dorothy Hissam (1901)
(25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903)
(25) Fred Hissam (1908)

(25) Mabel Hissam (1891)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862)

She was born on 24 July 1891 and died on 16 May 1892. The daughter of H.B. and Georgia Hissam.

(25) Hazel Hissam (1893)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862)

In the 1900 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Hazel Hissam, 7 [March 1893]. In the 1910 census of Sisterville, Tyler county as Hazel Hissam, 17. She married Oliver Combs in about 1925. In the 1930 census as Hazel Combs, 37. Oliver was a retail furntiure buyer.

(25) Bessie Hissam (1895)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862)

In the 1900 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Bessie Hissam, 5 [March 1895]. In the 1910 census of Sisterville, Tyler county as Bess Hissam, 15.

(25) Margaret Hissam (1897)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862)

In the 1900 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Margaret Hissam, 3 [May 1897]. In the 1910 census of Sisterville, Tyler county as Margaret Hissam, 13.

(25) Lawrence Hissam (1899)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862)

He was born on 15 June 1899 and died two months later. The son of H.B. and Georgia Hissam.

(25) Dorothy Hissam (1901)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862)

In the 1910 census of Sisterville, Tyler county as Dorothy Hissam, 9. In the 1930 census of Cleveland, Cuyahoga county, Ohio as Dorothy Hissom, a 29 year old switchboard operator for a social agency. She was a single woman living with her sister, Hazel, and her husband, Oliver Combs.

(25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862)

Known as Burton, Burt or Burton H., he was born in Sisterville, West Virginia on 3 [6] January 1903, the son of Harvey and Georgia Hissam - from "The Frederick Young Family" by Marialice Myers Hollinger. In the 1910 census of Sisterville, Tyler county as Burton Hissam, 7, living at home with his parents, H.B. and Georgia Hissam.

In the 1920 census . . .

Harvey Burton Hissam, 18, student, of Mogador, Summit county, Ohio, married Clara Frye, 17, also of Mogador, on 29 December 1921, in Summit, Ohio. Clara was born on 16 August 1904, the daughter of Martin S. Frye and Malinda Young. She was a student at the time of her marriage. Clara was unable to sign her marriage certificate due to "Confinement (labor terminating Pregnancy)."

In the 1930 census of Akron, Summit county, Ohio as Burton Hissam, a 27 year old supervisor in the rubber factory - that would be the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company. He owned a $5,000 house. Living with him were his wife, Clara, 25, and children, Richard, 8, Jimmy, 6, Marilyn, 5, Joan, 3, and Bobby [a son], 2. All the children were born in Ohio.

In the 1940 census of Akron, Summit county, Ohio as Harvey B. Hissam, a 37 year old supervisor at a rubber manufacturer. Living with him were his wife, Clara, 36, and children, Richard, 18, James, 16, Marilyn, 16, Joan, 13, Robert, 12, and Edwin, 1. Also living with them was Flora Henry, 45, a sister-in-law.

Clara died on 29 July 1983 in Summit county, Akron, Ohio. Burt died on 21 December 1987 in Stow, Ohio, at the age of 84. Their children were,
(26) Richard Eugene Hissam (1921)
(26) James "Jimmy" Donald Hissam (1923)
(26) Marilyn Louise Hissam (1924)
(26) Margaret Joan Hissam (1926)
(26) Robert "Bobby" Burton Hissam (1928)
(26) Don Edwin Hissam (1938)

(26) Richard Eugene Hissam (1921)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903)

He was born on 22 December 1921 in Mogadore, Ohio, which is a suburb of Akron. In the 1930 census of Akron, Summit county, Ohio as Richard Hissam, 8.

He married Helen Rosner on 11 April 1942. She was born on 26 March 1921. Richard was living in Summit county, Ohio when he enlisted in the Army on 21 October 1942 as a Private. He was married and had one year of college education. Not surprisingly, his civilian occupation was shown as "skilled occupation in production of rubber goods," probably at the Goodyear plant.

Richard was in the Army Air Force and trained as a pilot. There was an accident report for Richard E. Hissam in the July 1943 USAAF Stateside Accident report:

"Date: 430717 [17 July 1943] / Aircraft Type: AT-10 / Serial Number: 42-2078 / Squadron: Training #6 / Group: - / Home Base: George Field, IL / AF: - / Action: BLEF [Belly Landing due to Engine Failure or Fire] / D: 3 / Pilot: Hissem, Richard E / Country: USA / US State: AR / Location: Marianna, AR
A check of the serial number shows this was an AT-10BH aircraft based at George Army Air Field, in Lawrenceville, Illinois. This was a multi-engine aircraft training base so it is probable that Richard had other, previous assignments for his basic flight training. Richard may have been in Arkansas on a cross-country flight, practicing his navigation and building flight time.

At the end of his training Richard would have received the silver wings of a flying officer and been commissioned a second lieutenant. George Army Air Field is now Mid-America Airport.

AT-10

A twin-engine aircraft used to train bomber pilots. It could carry a crew of 4. It was manufactured by the Beechcraft company of Wichita, Kansas. The plane was made of wood in an attempt to save the more valuable aluminum for warplanes.








Training Squadron 6

The squadron also flew the Curtiss AT-9A, which had a crew of 2.

Richard probably flew the B-17 or B-24 during the war.

After the war he was a pharmacist, living in Indiana. He moved to Florida in 1963. He died on 23 August 2000, at the age of 78, in Seminole, Pinellas county, Florida. His obituary:

"Hissam, Richard E., 78, of Seminole, died Wednesday (Aug. 23, 2000) at Palms of Pasadena Hospital, South Pasadena. He was born in Mogadore, Ohio, and came here in 1963 from Indiana, where he was a self-employed pharmacist. He was an Army Air Force veteran of World War II. He was a member of St. Jerome Catholic Church and the Sertoma. Survivors include his wife of 58 years, Helen; three sons, Richard D., Longwood, William R., Gardnerville, Nev., and James M., Speedway, Ind.; two brothers, James, Louisville, Ky., and Edwin, Akron, Ohio; a sister, Joan Huffman, Elyria, Ohio; and four grandchildren. Garden Sanctuary Funeral Home, Seminole. "
Richard died in 2000 and was buried in Saint Petersburg, Pinellas county, Florida.

Richard and Helen's children were,
(27) Richard Donald Hissam (1942)
(27) William Robert Hissam (1944)
(27) James Michael Hissam (1954)

(27) Richard Donald Hissam (1942)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) Richard E. Hissam (1921)

The son of Richard Eugene Hissam, he was born on 29 December 1942. Or is he Richard David Hissam? Of Longwood, Florida. Longwood is a suburb of Orlando, in Seminole county. He married Hazel Croney on 05 April 1972.

He is a CFO with Tatum Partners. He holds a B.S. in Accounting from The Florida State University and is a licensed C.P.A. in the State of Florida. Their children are,
(28) Holly Lynn Hissam, 14 January 1974
(28) Patrick Michael Hissam, 24 May 1977

(27) William Robert Hissam (1944)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) Richard E. Hissam (1921)

He was born on 05 July 1944. Of Gardnerville, Nevada. His wife is Chrystal. He may have a son, William F.

(27) James Michael Hissam (1954)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) Richard E. Hissam (1921)

He was born on 24 September 1954. Of Speedway, Indiana.

(26) James "Jimmy" Donald Hissam (1923)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903)

Of Louisville, Kentucky. He was born on 28 April 1923. In the 1930 census of Akron, Summit county, Ohio as Jimmy Hissam, 6.

He married Marie Madeline Hesidence on 10 November 1944. She was born on 26 October 1922. James was an infantry solidier in Patton's 3rd Army, 87th Division during WWII and spent Christmas in Germany during the Battle of the Bulge. He must have joined the Division late because in November 1944 they were in England.

87th Division

The 87th Infantry Division arrived in Scotland, 22 October 1944, and trained in England, 23 October-30 November. It landed in France, 1-3 December, and moved to Metz, where, on the 8th, it went into action against and took Fort Driant. The Division then shifted to the vicinity of Gross Rederching near the Saar-German border on 10 December and captured Rimling, Obergailbach, and Guiderkirch.

Photograph, right: "Soldiers of the 87th Div., US Third Army, in tanks and jeeps rolling over pontoon bridge across Rhine River during drive on Berlin." - from Life magazine

The 87th was moving into Germany when Von Rundstedt launched his offensive in the Ardennes. The Division was placed in SHAEF reserve, 24-28 December, then thrown into the Bulge battle in Belgium, 29 December. In a fluctuating battle, it captured Moircy on the 30th and Remagne on the 31st. On 2 January 1945, it took Germont, on the 10th Tillet, and reached the Ourthe by the 13th. On 15 January 1945, the Division moved to Luxembourg to relieve the 4th Division along the Sauer and seized Wasserbillig on the 23d. The 87th moved to the vicinity of St. Vith, 28 January, and attacked and captured Schlierbach, Selz, and Hogden by the end of the month. After the fall of Neuendorf, 9 February, the Division went on the defensive until the 26th, when Ormont and Hallschlag were taken in night attacks. The 87th crossed the Kyll River, 6 March, took Dollendorf on the 8th, and after a brief rest, returned to combat, 13 March 1945, crossing the Moselle on the 16th and clearing Koblenz, 18-19 March. The Division crossed the Rhine, 25-26 March, despite strong opposition, consolidated its bridgehead, and secured Grossenlinden and Langgöns. On 7 April, it jumped off in an attack which carried it through Thuringia into Saxony. Plauen fell, 17 April, and the Division took up defensive positions, 20 April, about 4 miles from the Czech border. On 6 May 1945, it took Falkenstein and maintained its positions until VE-day.

The 87th Division returned to the States in July 1945 expecting to be called upon to play a role in the defeat of the Japanese, but the sudden termination of the war in the Pacific while the division was reassembling at Fort Benning changed the future of the 87th. The Division was inactivated 21 September 1945. - from Wikipedia

James D. Hissem is mentioned in "History of the Lambert Family from Jugenheim in Rheinhessen" by Christene Lambert Bertram. Also mentioned were Jo Anne, Lorraine and Wayne Hissam, though I don't know how, or if, they were related to James.

Of Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky. His obituary:

"Hisam, James D., 85, of Louisville, passed away Friday, June 13, 2008. He retired as CFO of C. Lee Cook Company after 32 years and served in the 3rd Army, 87th Division in the battle of the Bulge in World War II. He was an active member of the Kiwanis and was also involved with the Deaf Oral School. He was preceded in death by his son, Dr. James Hissam, of Savannah, GA. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, the former Marie M. Hesidence; his sons, Tom and David of Louisville, Robert of Brentwood, TN, and Donald Hissam, of Greenville, IN; 12 grandchildren; and 16 great-grandchildren. His funeral Mass will be celebrated 11 a.m. Tuesday at St. Albert the Great, with a private burial in Cave Hill Cemetery. Visitation will be held 2-7 p.m. Monday at Ratterman's, 3711 Lexington Road. Memorial gifts may be made to St. Vincent DePaul Society." - from The Courier-Journal on 15 June 2008
His children were,
(27) Dr. James Edwin Hissam (1946)
(27) Thomas Burton Hissam (1948)
(27) Robert Charles Hissam (1951)
(27) Donald Richard Hissam (1954)
(27) David Allen Hissam (1960)

(27) Dr. James Edwin Hissam (1946)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) James "Jimmy" Donald Hissam (1923)

Of Savanah, Georgia. The son of James D. Hissam, he was born on 30 August 1946. He graduated from Trinity High School, in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1964. This is a Catholic school. An M.D. in Family Practice. He married Prudence Valle on 14 June 1973. She was born on 25 August 1948.

He last lived at 206 Johnny Mercer Blvd, in Savannah. He took up flying and soloed on 5 May 2004, photo at right.

James pre-deceased his father, dying in 2006. His children are,
(28) James Anthony Hissam (c1975)
(28) Michael D. Hissam (1978)
(28) Edwin Hissam (1982)

(28) James Anthony Hissam (c1975)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) James "Jimmy" Donald Hissam (1923) (27) Dr. James Edwin Hissam (1946)

He was born on 3 April 1975, the oldest son of James Edwin Hissam. He graduated from the Benedictine Military School and The Citadel, receiving a bachelor's degree in History Education in 1997. He served as an Army Ranger 1st Lieutenant in Vicenza, Italy. He married Christine Gail Tan on 6 July 2001 in Vicenza.

(28) Michael D. Hissam (1978)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) James "Jimmy" Donald Hissam (1923) (27) Dr. James Edwin Hissam (1946)

He was born on 10 January 1978 in Savannah, Georgia. A pole vaulter. He graduated from Benedictine Military High School and the University of Florida with a degree in Business Adminstration. A Michael D. Hissam is a membership chair for "Golden Gate" in the California Association of Health Underwriters. This a an organization of health and life insurance agents.

There is also a Michael Hissam who has been communications manager & regional director of Mexican operations for Delphi Electronics in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. I don't think he fits here.

(28) Edwin Hissam (1982)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) James "Jimmy" Donald Hissam (1923) (27) Dr. James Edwin Hissam (1946)

He was born on 21 December 1982. A pole vaulter. He graduated from Benedictine Military High School and attended the University of Florida as a Business major.

(27) Thomas Burton Hissam (1948)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) James "Jimmy" Donald Hissam (1923)

Of Louisville, Kentucky. He was born on 12 August 1948. He graduated from Trinity High School in Louisville, Kentucky in 1967. Associate Partner in IBM’s Global Smart Card Solutions consulting practice / IBM Sales Executive. He married Lisa Fisher. She was born on 18 September 1957. Their children are,
(28) Veronica Madoline Hissam (1974), born 28 September 1974
(28) William Asa Hissam (1976), born 3 August 1976

(27) Robert Charles Hissam (1951)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) James "Jimmy" Donald Hissam (1923)

Of Brentwood, Tennessee. He was born on 25 February 1951. A Robert C. Hissam graduated from Trinity High School in Louisville, Kentucky in 1969. IRS Nashville District project coordinator for the Barter Exchange Project. A bio:

"Bob Hissam is a 1973 graduate of Murray State University with a B.S. in Accounting. He obtained the Certified Public Accountant certificate in 1987 and currently maintains an active status. He taught at Fisk University in 1989 & 1990. Bob has held the positions of Internal Revenue Agent, Group Manger, and Returns Program Manager in his 27 years of service with the IRS. He was selected as the Federal Employee of the Year in 1994 in the Technical area. Bob currently serves as a Revenue Agent in the Special Enforcement Program. He has served as the government's expert witness in several criminal tax trials. Bob currently resides in Nashville, Tennessee "
He married Gertrude Ann Clark on 10 June 1970. She was born on 30 July 1950. Another reference notes that "Robert works for the IRS as a certified public accountant. They are members of the Catholic church." - from "The Frederick Young Family." Bob and Gertrude's children were,
(28) Jennifer Ann Hissam (1972), born 04 April 1972
(28) Julie Christine Hissam (1975), born 13 September 1975
(28) Timothy Robert Hissam (1977), born 25 December 1977

(27) Donald Richard Hissam (1954)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) James "Jimmy" Donald Hissam (1923)

Of Greenville, Indiana. He was born on 8 February 1954. He graduated from Trinity High School in Louisville, Kentucky in 1972. A manager at the Brown-Forman Corporation, a wine and spirits company.

(27) David Allen Hissam (1960)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) James "Jimmy" Donald Hissam (1923)

He was born on 22 April 1960. David A. Hissam graduated from Trinity High School in Louisville, Kentucky in 1978. A David A. Hissam also graduated from the University of Dayton School of Engineering in 1983.

He may work at the NASA Marshall Center in Huntsville, Alabama. A David A. Hissam, TD [Technical Director?] was one of 27 Marshall employees to receive a patent award. He did graduate work at the University of Alabama at Huntsville.

On the other hand, from a Trinity High School newsletter is this about David Hissam from the class of 1978,

"Bruce Palmer-Ball and David Hissam have formed a new partnership called Garage 360, LLC. The business is focused on organizing and remodeling garages by providing a flexible organizing system along with cabinetry, accessories and custom flooring. If you can’t get your car in your garage, give them a call at 502-594-5384 or visit their Web site at www.garage-360.com."
Since this company is located in Louisville I suspect our NASA friend is not our man.

(26) Marilyn Louise Hissam (1924)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903)

She was born on 30 September 1924. In the 1930 census of Akron, Summit county, Ohio as Marilyn Hissam, 5. She married Harry Goodspeed on 16 November 1945.

(26) Margaret Joan Hissam (1926)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903)

She was born on 24 July 1926. In the 1930 census of Akron, Summit county, Ohio as Joan Hissam, 3. She married Albert G. Huffman on 4 November 1947. Of Elyria, Ohio.

(26) Robert "Bobby" Burton Hissam (1928)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903)

He was born on 9 March 1928. In the 1930 census of Akron, Summit county, Ohio as Bobby Hissam, 2. Born in Ohio. He married Evelyn Keifer on 24 November 1948. She was born on 2 May 1929. They had one child together, a girl, Cheri - from "The Frederick Young Family" by Marialice Myers Hollinger. Cheri died on 1 November 1950, seemingly in childbirth.

Robert's second wife was Ruby Ann Light [Ruby S. Hissam?], whom he married on 4 January 1958. Robert died in January 1985 in Vienna, Virginia. This is just outside Washington, D.C. I have a Robert B. Hissam, born in 1928 and died on 2 January 1985 buried in Fairfax county, Virginia.

Ruby continues to Virginia, locating variously at Ashburn, Leesburg and Bluemont. Ruby and her daughter, Patty, owned and operated the Bluemont General Store from 2005 to 2006.

Robert's children were,
(27) Cheri Michelle Hissam (1950), born 01 November 1950, married Edward McDavitt on 15 June 1969
(27) Patricia Lynn Hissam (1960), born 16 March 1960 in Washington, D.C., married Robert J. Stevenson on 19 March 1980. Her marriage to Robert Stevenson ended in divorce. She died on 1 December 2007, at the age of 47, of brain cancer.
(27) Cynthia Ann Hissam (1962), born 16 January 1962
(27) Jennifer Hissam (1967), born 24 February 1967, she attended Madison High School in Vienna, Virginia, class of 1986

(26) Don Edwin Hissam (1938)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903)

He was born on 18 July 1938. Don Edwin Hissam attended Ohio Northern University in 1961 in Ada, Ohio.

I think the following fits here. An Eddie Burton Hissam married Mohola Ann Coffman in 1959 in Braxton, West Virginia. They had one child I'm aware of, Alvin [also William Stanley?], who was born in 1961. I think they then divorced. Moloha went on to marry Kenneth C. Martin. In Kenneth Martin's obituary, Alvin was listed as a son of Kenneth, so apparently Moloha took her new born son with her to the new marriage.

Edwin married Bonnie Lou Rogers on 10 January 1962. She was born on 28 February 1937 in Ravenna, Portage county, Ohio. Bonnie died on 13 July 1999. His children were,
(27) William Stanley Hissam (1958) ???, born 25 May 1958, he married Shelley Farkas. They live in Stow, Ohio. They own Rottweilers.
(27) Alvin E. Hissam (1961)
(27) Pamela Sue Hissam (1964), born 02 August 1964, she graduated from Stow High School in 1981. She married a Hoover.
(27) Kimberly Margaret Hissam (1967), born 23 December 1967, she graduated from Stow High School in 1987. She married Doug Mitchell.

(27) Alvin E. Hissam (1961)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862) (25) Harvey Burton Hissam (1903) (26) Don Edwin Hissam (1938)

Alvin E. Hissam was born on 16 November 1961 in Cambridge, Guernsey county, Ohio; mother's maiden name Coffman.

Of Birch River, West Virginia. He married Tonya S. Davis, the daughter of Vaughn L. Davis and Wanda Lee Martin.

Tonya S.'Tammy' Davis Hissam, 39, of Birch River, WV died suddenly May 15, 2004 at her home. She was born December 26, 1964 in Gassaway, WV. She attended the Birch River Baptist Church, Birch River, WV. She was a homemaker and a classroom volunteer at the Birch River Elementary School. She was preceded in death by her mother, Wanda Lee Martin Davis, who died April 9, 1998. She is survived by her husband, Alvin E. Hissam; one son Matthew A. Hissam of Birch River, and his fiancee Shani Bragg; her father Vaughn L. Davis of Birch River; two brothers Timothy J. Davis of Birch River and Thomas V. Davis of Sutton, WV; one sister Teresa D. Conrad of Birch River. Funeral services were held at 1:00 p.m., Wednesday, May 19, 2004 at Greene-Robertson Funeral Home, Sutton,WV with Rev. Gary Walker officiating. Burial was in the Cox cemetery near Birch River, WV. Memorial gifts may be made to the Birch River Baptist Church, c/o Clara Mae Given, 133 Oldwood Drive, Birch River, WV 26610." - from Braxton county, West Virginia Obituaries.

(28) Matthew A. Hissam (c1985)
(27) Alvin E. Hissam (1961)

Of Birch River.

(25) Fred Hissam (1908)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Harvey B. Hissam (1862)

In the 1910 census of Sisterville, Tyler county as Fred Hissam, 1 1/2. In the 1920 census of Akron, Summit county, Ohio as Fred Hissam, 11. He, and his father Harvey J. [sic] Hissam, 57, were lodgers in the house of Sarah Betwer.

(24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824)

I believe his middle name was Joseph. He was born on 5 October 1865 in Tyler county. In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Tyler county as Samuel Hissem, 5. In the 1880 census for Lincoln township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Samuel J. Hissam, 14.

Samuel Hissam married Eunice M. Calhoun on 28 March 1889 in Tyler county, West Virginia. In the 1900 census of Lincoln townhip, Tyler county as Samuel Hissam, a 34 yer old U.S. Postal Clerk. Living with him were his wife, Eunice M., 28 [March 1872], and children, Clare, 8 [December 1891], Paul B., 5 [June 1894], and Grace, 1 [September 1898]. At this point Eunice had 8 children, of which only the 3 listed were still living. Also living with them was Samuel's father-in-law, John C. Calhoun, a 66 year old steamer engineer.

In the 1910 census of Union township, Tyler county as Samuel Hissam, a 44 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Eunice M., 38, and children, Paul B., a 15 year old farm laborer, Grace M., 11, Bernice, 9, Eugenie, 7, Ellen, 4, and Louis B., 2. Also living with him were his mother-in-law, Mrs. Jane Calhoun, a 71 year old widow.

In the 1920 census?

In the 1930 census of Union township as Sam Hissam, a 64 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Eunice M., 58, and children, George R., 18, and Sam J., 14.

From "The History of West Virginia, Old and New," 1923, The American Historical Society, Inc., Chicago and New York, Volume III, pg. 34:

“Sam Hissam is one of the older residents of the Sistersville (WV) community. In early life he was a teacher in Tyler County, then in the railway mail service, until oil development on his farm gave him private interests requiring his supervision. Mr. Hissam is still an oil producer and active farmer, and has shared in the public responsibilities of the county and is now postmaster of Sistersville."

At left is a photo of Sistersville during the second West Virginia oil boom in 1890.

"The Hissam family is of English ancestry and has been in America since Colonial times. His grandfather, Thomas Hissam, was a native of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he grew up, learned the trade of shoemaker but also followed farming. In Westmoreland County he married a Miss White, who was born on the ocean during a four months voyage while her parents were coming from Ireland. Shortly after his marriage Thomas Hissam moved to Tyler County, West Virginia, and lived out his life here as a farmer and worker at his trade. His son, William Hissam, was born in Tyler County in 1824, and spent all his life as an industrious farmer and was one of the respected members of his community. He died in 1907. He was a democrat and a leader in the Christian Church. His first wife was Elizabeth Weekly, who was born in Tyler County in 1834 and died in 1906. His second wife was Frances Malson, a native and life-long resident of Tyler County, and they reared a family of five children. Elizabeth Weekly Hissam was the mother of five children: Elijah C., a farmer who died at Coryopolis, Pennsylvania, in 1919, at the age of sixty-three: Samantha, who died at East Liverpool, Ohio, wife of Sam Winning, a cooper by trade, who died at Sistersville; Margaret, who died at Cornwallis in Ritchie County, West Virginia, in 1879, wife of Harvey M. Weekly, a farmer still living in Ritchie County; Harvey B., employed in a rubber factory in Akron, Ohio; and Sam.“

"Sam Hissam was born on a farm a mile south of Sistersville October 5, 1865, and secured his early advantages in the rural schools, attended several summer normal schools at Sistersville and Middlebourne, and at the age of twenty- one was given his first opportunity to teach in a district school in Tyler County. Altogether he taught seven terms of country school, for one term was principal of the Middlebourne graded school, and another term was teacher of the grammar room at Sistersville. After passing the civil service examination Mr. Hissam in 1895 was appointed a substitute in the railway mail service, in 1896 was given his first regular appointment, and turned over his school to the then county superintendent, Thomas P. Hill, who finished out the term. Mr. Hill is now an attorney at Middlebourne. Mr. Hissam's first assignment was on the run between Wheeling and Garrett, Indiana, but two years later he was transferred to the Pittsburgh and Kenova Railway post office, and was on this run until he resigned May 21, 1907."

"For a number of years Mr. Hissam had owned a farm of a hundred and forty acres at Dry Run in Tyler County. This came within the area of oil prospecting, and after oil was developed on the farm Mr. Hissam sold the property in 1907, though retaining his oil royalties. A number of wells were drilled there and one is still producing. In 1907 Mr. Hissam bought another farm of two hundred and fifty acres on Middle Island Creek, six miles south of Sistersville, and he still owns and operates this property. In connection with farming he was for about two years rather extensively engaged in the lumber business, buying tracts of standing timber in Tyler County and having it cut, logged and sawed. He was in this business from 1917 until the fall of 1919."

"In 1910 Mr. Hissam was elected commissioner of the County Court, and filled that office six years with credit. August 29, 1919, he was appointed postmaster of Sistersville, his name standing first on the list of the classified civil service. In 1905 the Town Council of Sistergville appointed him assessor, an office he filled one year, and at the same time was deputy county assessor."

"Mr. Hissam is a democrat, is an elder in the Christian Church of Sistersville, a member of Sistersville Lodge No. 333, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Kiwanis Club and the Sistersville Country Club. He owns a modern home on Cemetery Road. During the war he was a participant in every drive, being a member of the committee for the first Liberty Loan drive in Union District, and district chairman of all the other loan campaigns. He was chairman of the Little Buffalo School District for the Y. M. C. A. drive, was captain of a team for the Red Cross campaigns, was a member of the Tyler County Council of Defense, and a Four Minute speaker. He and Mrs. Hissam used their car almost constantly in some of the many phases of patriotic endeavor during this period."

"March 28, 1889, at Sistersville, Mr. Hissam married Miss Eunice M. Calhoun, daughter of John C. and Jane (Dark) Calhoun. Her father, now deceased, was a steamboat engineer for many years. Her mother lives with Mr. and Mrs. Hissam. Mr. and Mrs. Hissam have an interesting family of eight children. The oldest, Paul B., was a soldier boy, and his record is given a paragraph by itself. Grace is the wife of Ira W. Moore, an oil field worker in Tyler County; Bernice is the wife of Garnett H. Hadley, an oil field worker living near Sistersville. Eugenie is the wife of Neil E. Riggs, a glass worker at Sistersville. Ellen is a student in the Sistersville High School, while the younger children are Benjamin L., born March 1, 1908; George R., born June 9, 1911, and Sam, born June 12, 1915."

Sam Hissam, 1865-1957, was buried in the Greenwod cemetary of Tyler county. With him was his wife, Eunice, 1872-1959.

His children were,
(25) Clare Hissam (1891)
(25) Paul B. Hissam (1894)
(25) Grace M. Hissam (1898)
(25) Bernice L. Hissam (1901)
(25) Eugenie Hissam (1903)
(25) Ellen Hissam (1906)
(25) Benjamin L. Hissam (1908)
(25) George R. Hissam (1911)
(25) Sam Joseph Hissam (1915)

(25) Clare Hissam (1891)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)

In the 1900 census of Lincoln townhip, Tyler county as Clare Hissam, 8 [December 1891]. She was not in subsequent census' and apparently had died young.

(25) Paul B. Hissam (1894)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)

He was born on 4 June 1894. In the 1900 census of Lincoln townhip, Tyler county as Paul B. Hissam, 5 [June 1894]. In the 1910 census of Union township, Tyler county as Paul B. Hissam, a 15 year old farm laborer, living at home with his parents.

He registered for the draft in Sistersville, Tyler county on 5 June 1917, at the age of 23. He was a single oil worker employed by the Hissam Garbyt [?] M---head [garbled]. I assume this involved working on the wellheads on his father's land. He was of medium height and build, with brown eyes and hair.

He enlisted in January 1917, before America entered the war with Germany [is it possible to register for the draft after you've enlisted?]. He was first sent to Fort Leavenworth, then to Camp Jackson and Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, then to Camp Upton on Long Island, and in July 1918, embarked for overseas, going to France by way of England. He served in the Field Signal Corps, Second Army Corps, brigaded with the British on the San Quentin and Cambrai sectors. He remained there until the armistice was signed, and was returned home in April 1919. He was mustered out as a Corporal at Camp Dix, New Jersey.

In the 1920 census of Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Paul B. Hissam, a 25 year old farmer. Living with him were his sisters, Grace M., 21, and Bernice L., 19.

He moved to Falcon, Kentucky where he was an assistant foreman for the Petroleum Exploration Company [of Sistersville, West Virginia]. Falcon is in Magoffin county, in eastern Kentucky, just west of the border with West Virginia. It is in the Eastern Coal Field region of the state. Coal mining remains the main industry, but "oil springs" had been discovered in the county as early as 1854. By the way, Magoffin county was the birthplace of Larry Flynt, the publisher of Hustler magazine, not something the communit is proud of.

Paul married Ruth L. She was born on 19 October 1910. In the 1930 census?

A 1975 newspaper article indicated that he had a son, and that they were living in Lexington.

Paul died on 12 August 1977, at the age of 83, in Barbourville, Knox county, Kentucky. Barbourville is south of Falcon, close to the border with Tennessee, on the upper Cumberland river. It is in the Eastern Coal Field region of the state in the heart of the Blue Gem coal field. Ruth died on 17 March 1993. Both were buried at the Barbourville cemetary, in Kentucky.

"Paul B. Hissam, who was born June 4, 1894, enlisted in January, 1917, before America entered the war with Germany. He was first sent to Fort Leavenworth, then to Camp Jackson and Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, then to Camp Tipton on Long Island, and in July, 1918, embarked for overseas, going to France by way of England. He was in the Field Signal Corps with the Second Army Corps, and was brigaded with the British on the San Quentin and Cambrai sectors. He remained there until the armistice was signed, and was returned home in April, 1919, and mustered out with the rank of corporal at Camp Dix, New Jersey. He now lives at Falcon, Kentucky, being assistant foreman for the Petroleum Exploration Company."

- from the "History of West Virginia"


(26) Samuel Joseph Hissam (1944)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865) (25) Paul B. Hissam (1894)

Known as Sam Joe. The Barbourville High School class of 1962 includes a Samuel Joseph Hissam. I assume he was born in 1944 and was a son of Paul's, though born fairly late in Paul's life. Named for his grandfather. There is also currently a Samuel J. Hissam who is the Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 278, chartered by the Lynch Station Ruritan Club, in the Piedmont district [Lynch Station is in Virginia so this is confusing]. A 1975 newspaper article links him with Paul Hissam, his elder brother, says he has a daughter, and gives his address as Virginia.

(25) Grace M. Hissam (1898)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)

In the 1900 census of Lincoln townhip, Tyler county as Grace Hissam, 1 [September 1898]. In the 1910 census of Union township, Tyler county as Grace M. Hissam, 11. In the 1920 census of Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Grace M. Hissam, 21. She was living with her brother, Paul B., 25, and sister, Bernice L., 19. She married Ira W. Moore, an oil field worker in Tyler county.

(25) Bernice L. Hissam (1901)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)

She was born in Sisterville in about 1901. In the 1910 census of Union township, Tyler county as Bernice Hissam, 9. In the 1920 census of Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Bernice L. Hissam, 19. She was living with her brother, Paul B., 25, and sister, Grace M. Hissam, 21. She married Garnett H. Hadley, an oil field worker in Sisterville. She later married Clifton Parr. Of Bens Run, West Virginia. She died on 21 September 1990.

(25) Eugenie Hissam (1903)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)

Known as Gene. In the 1910 census of Union township, Tyler county Eugenie Hissam, 7. The wife of Neil E. Riggs, a glass worker at Sisterville. She died on 22 June 1988, at the age of 85, in the Sistersville General Hostipal.

"June 25, 1988
GENE HISSAM RIGGS

Gene Hissam Riggs, 85, of 102 Wiley Ave., Sistersville, died Wednesday, June 22, in Sistersville General Hospital.

She was born in Tyler County, daughter of the late Sam and Eunice Calhoun Hissam. She was a member of the Baptist Church and was a retired salesperson. She was a member of the Martha Washington Chapter of Eastern Star No. 22, the White Shrine of Marietta and the Sistersville Emblem Club.

She is survived by one son, Glenn Terrill Riggs of Paden City; one daugher, Pauline Ward of Sistersville, two granddaughters; three brothers, George Hissam of Alvy, Ben Hissam of Kissimmee, Fla and Sam Hissam of Wyoming, Mich., and one sister, Bernice Parr of Bens Run.

She was preceded in death by her husband Neil Riggs in 1983 and one daughter, Jerry Hayes.

Services will be Saturday, 10am at the Eckels Funeral Home, Sistersville, Rev. Garold Hopkins officiating. Burial in Greenwood Cemetery, Sistersville."

(25) Ellen Hissam (1906)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)

In the 1910 census of Union township, Tyler county as Ellen Hissam, 4. Ellen died young and was buried in the Greenwood cemetary. Her tombstone shows the dates 1906-1924.

(25) Benjamin L. Hissam (1908)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)

He was born on 1 March 1908. In the 1910 census of Union township, Tyler county as Louis B. Hissam, 2. I can not find him in the 1920/1930 census. I have a reference to a Benjamin Hissem who was a teacher of piano and composition around 1965. Ben L. Hissam died on 24 April 1999 in Kissimmee, Osceola county, Florida.

(25) George R. Hissam (1911)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)

He was born on 12 June 1911. In the 1930 census as George R. Hissam, 18, living at home with his parents. Of Alvy, West Virginia. He died on 13 June 1990. He was buried in the Beechwood cemetary in Tyler county. His tombstone showed dates of 12 June 1911 to 13 June 1990, and the note, "TEC 4 U.S. Army WW II." George's obituary:

"Oracle" - June 20, 1990

GEORGE R. HISSAM
Died June 13, 1990

George R. Hissam, 79, of Alma, died June 13 at the Ohio Valley Medical Center, Wheeling.

He was born in Addonis, W.Va., a son of the late Sam and Eunice Hissam. He ws a retired maintenance supervisor at Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel Co. He was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II and a member of the Big Run Methodist Church, Alma.

He is survived by his wife, Freda Nichols Hissam; one sister, Bernice Parr of Ben's Run; and two brothers, Ben Hissam of Kissimimee, Fla., and Sam Hissam of Wyoming, Mich.

Services were Friday at the Furbee Funeral Home, Alma, with the Rev. Louise Baker officiating. Burial was in the Beechwood Cemetery, Alma."

Freda V. [N?] Hissam was also buried in the Beechwood cemetary. Her dates were 11 Apr 1910 to 4 February 1996.

(25) Sam Joseph Hissam (1915)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Samuel J. Hissam (1865)

He was born on 9 June 1915. In the 1930 census as Sam J. Hissam, 14. He died in Grand Rapids, Michigan on 14 November 1994 while living in Wyoming, Kent county, Michigan.

(24) Adeline [Hissam/Malson] (1867)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824)

She was born on 10 April 1868 in Tyler, West Virginia. In the 1880 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county she, and the younger children, were listed first, with William's new wife, Francis, while the older children were listed below. I think that would normally indicate that she was the eldest child of Francis and William, but her age, 13, would have made her several years illegitimate. I think she was actually the sister of Francis Maulson Hissam rather than her daughter. Other sources agree that she was actually a Malson [Maulson], but list her as Francis' daughter nonetheless. I'm told that she "is also found as a servant in another 1880 census in the Union District of Tyler Co., as is her [twin] sister Caroline found in the Union District as a servant."

Adaline Malson married William A. [Anderson] Mikes on 30 January 1886 in Tyler county, West Virginia. She died on 18 July 1919 and was buried in the Little cemetary.

(24) Flora Belle Hissam (1875)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824)

She was born on 8 February 1875. Aged 5 at the time of the 1880 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county. She married George Alexander Wilson on 22 August 1894 in Shiloh, Tyler County, West Virginia. She died in Tyler county.

(24) Thomas Hissam (1879)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824)

The son of William and Francis. He was born on 25 August 1879 in West Virginia. He was 2 years old at the time of the 1880 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county.

Thomas Hissam married Martha Henthorn on 3 October 1896 in Wetzel county, West Virginia. She was born in March 1872 in Ohio. In the 1900 census of Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Thomas Hissam, a 20 year old day laborer. Living with him were his wife, Martha, 29 [March 1872], and children, Willie, 3 [July 1896], and Rosa M., 1 [May 1899]. Martha had 4 children, of which 3 were still living. Where's the third? The 1910 census, below, indicates that this was Martha's second child.

In the 1910 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county as Thomas Hissam, a 31 year old railroad laborer. Living with him were his wife, Martha, 37, and children, William, 13, Rosa M., 11, Ella G., 7, Cora M., 6, and Laurence V., 4.

Martha died sometime between 1910 and 1918. Thomas Hissam registered for the draft on 12 September 1918, at the age of 39, in Chestnut Grove, Sistersville district, Tyler county, West Virginia. He was a laborer for E Hirston & Company in Sistersville. He listed his nearest relative as Miss Rosa May Hissam of Chestnut Grove. This would be his daughter. He was of medium height and build with blue eyes and dark brown hair.

In the 1920 census of Sistersville, Tyler county as Thomas Hissom, a 40 year old laborer in a Green House. He was widowed. Living with him was his son, Lawrence V., 13.

In the 1930 census of Sistersville as Thomas Hissom, a 52 year old laborer at odd jobs. A widower. Living with him was his son, Lawrennce, a 22 year old laborer at odd jobs.

His children were,
(25) William Hissam (1896)
(25) Rosa M. Hissam (1899)
(25) Ella G. Hissam (1903)
(25) Cora M. Hissam (1904)
(25) Lawrence V. Hissam (1906)

(25) William Hissam (1896)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Thomas Hissam (1879)

In the 1910 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county as William Hissam, 13. I have a William Hissom, born on 16 September 1896, who registered for the draft on 12 September 1918, at the age of 41, in Sistersville, Tyler county, West Virginia. This was the same day that his father, William, registered. He was working as a Gasoline Clerk [garbled] for the Carter Oil Company of Sistersville. His nearest relative was Mrs. Eliza Hissom, with whom he was living [his wife?]. He was short and slender, with brown eyes and black hair.

(25) Rosa M. Hissam (1899)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Thomas Hissam (1879)

In the 1910 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county as Rosa M. Hissam, 11. She was listed as the nearest relative by her brother, Thomas Hissam, above, in his draft registration in 1918. She was shown as a "Miss," that is single, and living in Chestnut Grove, Sistersville district, Tyler county, West Virginia.

(25) Ella G. Hissam (1903)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Thomas Hissam (1879)

In the 1910 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county as Ella G. Hissam, 7.

(25) Cora M. Hissam (1904)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Thomas Hissam (1879)

In the 1910 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county as Cora M. Hissam, 6.

(25) Lawrence V. Hissam (1906)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824) (24) Thomas Hissam (1879)

In the 1910 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county as Laurence V. Hissam, 4. In the 1920 census of Sistersville, Tyler county as Lawrence V. Hissom, 13. In the 1930 census of Sistersville as Lawrennce Hissom, a 22 year old laborer at odd jobs.

(24) Rosa D. Hissam (1880)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) William Hissam (1824)

She was not listed in the 1880 census, performed on 7 June 1880, but the 1900 census of Lincoln township, Tyler county, West Virginia shows her as born in June 1880. She married Jackson Banne in about 1898. A Jack Bond married Rosa Hissam on 3 July 1897 in Tyler county. Could this be our couple? Living with them in 1900 was her mother, Frances Hissam.

(23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

The son of Thomas and his first wife, Isabell. Note in his application for a pension, below, he clearly noted that he was a "half-brother" of Samuel Hissam, who was the son of Thomas and his second wife, Rachel. He was born in 1829 in Tyler county, West Virginia.

In the 1850 census . . .

Thomas J. Hisam was, in 1853, a witness to the will of his "uncle", Thomas Heysham, the son of David Heysham.

"Thomas Heysham and Mina [Wilhemina] McCann were united in marriage in Tyler Co., VA on the 11th day of August, 1856, by B. Higgins, a Methodist minister" - per D. Hickman, Clerk, Tyler county, West Virginia. She was born in 1838, the daughter of Robert McCann and Kesiah.

In the 1860 census of Russell Mills, Tyler county, Virginia as Thomas J. Hissam, a 33 year old miller, of Pennsylvania. Living with him were his wfie, Wilhelminia, 22, and children, Theodore R., 2, and Joseph A., 3 months, all of Virginia.

Thomas served in the Civil War, a Private in Company "E" of the 10th West Virginia Infantry Volunteers. See the Muster Roll of Company E. He served there with his cousin, Jesse, and brother, Samuel. He initially mustered at Buckhannon, in Upshur county, on 12 April 1862.

"Enrolled: February 20, 1862, at Tyler Co., to serve 3 years. Mustered in: as Corporal on April 12, 1862, at Clarksburg, WV into: Company E, 10th Infantry Regiment of WV Volunteers - commanded by: Captain L.M. Marsh."
In another reference we have Thomas J. and his younger brother, Samuel, as well as Jesse.
"Pvt. Thomas J. Hissam, Tyler County, 33 [1829]. Mustered at Buckhannon April 12, 1862. Mustered out May 2, 1865.
Pvt. Jesse Hissam, Tyler County, 25 [1837]. Mustered April 12, 1862. Detailed to Quartermaster Department. Mustered out May 2, 1865.
Pvt. Samuel Hissam, Tyler County, 23 [1839]. Mustered at Camp Hartsuff Oct. 4, 1862. Detailed to division hospital."

Who was Jesse Hissem?

Jesse, of the Abner of Thomas Line, was too old by 10 years to be this man. Was he another child for Thomas and Rachel? I have a stray, undated, reference, "To Capt. Aug. 8 Darnell, In charge of prisoners for Wheeling, Wheeling, Va. Request Governor Pierpont to grant no commission to Jesse Hissam until letter is . . ." - from "Calendar of the Francis Harrison Pierpont Letters and Papers." Pierpoint (1814-1899), called the Father of West Virginia, was the Governor of the Union controlled portions of Virginia during the Civil War. He was Governor of all of Virginia from 1865 to 1868.

Jesse Hissam mustered in as a Sergeant and out as a Private.

I have a Jesse Hissum, the son of Levi of Thomas, who was born circa 1836, in Virginia. However he was living in Missouri in 1850. Not in the 1860 census.

In the 1880 census of Harmon [Harmar], Washington county, Ohio as Jessie Hisam, a 45 year old cooper [1835]. Living with him was his wife, Evoline, 43. I think they had been married 16 years. Jessie had been living in the county for 4 years at the time of the census. He had been born in Ohio [?], of Pennsylvania parents; she in Virginia, of Pennsylvania parents. I think this may be 'our' Jesse in part because not only is the age right, but he was a cooper, like (22) Levi, and his sons, (23) Joshua and (23) William.

Did Jesse return from Missouri to serve with his cousins, then remain in Ohio after the war to raise a family?

Camp Hartsuff

I haven't been able to find this camp, but it was in the vicinity of Buckhannon. Company E was at Buckhannon in April 1862, but by October were at Campt Hartsuff.


10th West Virginia Volunteers

From the Adjutant General’s Report: "From the time that recruiting for this Regiment commenced, in the latter months of 1861, the men, as soon as enlisted, were assigned to duty on the frontier of the Department of Western Virginia, then commanded by Gen. Rosecrans. These men, many of them driven from their homes by the guerrillas, of Gilmer, Braxton, Webster and Pocahontas Counties [these are a line of counties stretching from the border with Virginia to the southeast border of Ritchie county, clearly a "route of destruction" taken by the guerilla fighters], were especially adapted to the frontier defense, by their knowledge of the country and of the habits of the rebel marauders by whom it was infested and were stimulated to extraordinary exertions by wrongs already suffered and homes to defend."

"In March 1862, organization was commenced by the muster of' four companies into the United States service with Thomas M. Harris (now Brig. General) as Lieut. Col. commanding, and the line to be guarded by this Regiment, one company of Cavalry, and a section of Artillery, was extended from Glenville to Elkwater."

"Under this arrangement the border was protected for seven months, many guerrilla bands being effectually dispersed or driven out of West Virginia, whilst others were, almost to a man, exterminated. Indeed, so successful was this small command in the defence of that large territory, as to elicit frequent expressions of commendation and thanks from the Major General commanding, and also to secure the confidence and gratitude of the loyal people of those Counties for the skillful management, zeal and courage displayed. In the meantime, organization of the Regiment was completed. Lieut. Col. Harris promoted to the Colonelcy, and in the month of September, 1862, headquarters were removed from Buckhannon to Bulltown, where, for the first time, as many as seven companies were concentrated."

"While here, the command was, as heretofore, successful in breaking up the marauders of that section. In the latter part of October, 1862, the Regiment was attached to the command of Gen. Milroy, under whom it took up the line of march (Nov. 4th) for Beverly, where all detachments were collected, and the command moved via Webster and New Creek to Winchester, Va. [this is in the Shenandoah Valley], reaching the latter place on the first day of January, 1863."

"While in the Division of Gen. Milroy, at Winchester, the Regiment took part in several expeditions up the Valley of the Shenandoah [these were campaigns in which Confederate General "Stonewall" Jackson effectively humiliated the Union armies, out manuevering them at every turn]. No casualties were sustained in any of these expeditions, but, unfortunately, exposure to the changing weather of a most inclement winter on the march from Bulltown to Winchester, and afterward, resulted in disease from which the command did not recover until the ensuing summer. The deaths from disease (chiefly fever) from Dec. 1st, 1862, to June 1863, numbered forty-three."

"On the tenth of May, 1863, the Regiment was ordered back to West Virginia, and soon after its arrival at Webster station, was attached to the Brigade of Gen. Wm. W. Averell, by whom it was sent to Buckhannon, and thence on the 7th of June to Beverly. On the 2nd of July following, while stationed at Beverly, an attack was made upon the place by the enemy under Col. Wm. L. Jackson. This was the first time that the Regiment in a body had met the enemy, who were here held at bay for two days, notwithstanding their great numerical superiority, until the arrival of reinforcements compelled them to retreat, beaten."

"The Regiment was engaged in the battle of Droop Mountain, on the 6th of November, 1863, and was highly complimented by Gen. Averell, commanding, for gallantry displayed in that action, and afterward formed a part of a number of those expeditions or "raids," which have reflected so much credit upon the command of that distinguished officer."

[The Battle of Droop Mountain: In early November, Brig. Gens. W.W. Averell and Alfred Napoleon Alexander Duffié embarked on a raid into southwestern Virginia to disrupt the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad. While Duffié’s column destroyed military property en route, Averell encountered and defeated a Confederate brigade under Brig. Gen. John Echols at Droop Mountain. The Union columns reunited at Lewisburg the next day but were in no condition to continue their raid. After this battle, Confederate resistance in West Virginia collapsed.]

"With headquarters at Beverly, the Regiment remained in West Virginia until about the 15th of June, 1864, when it was removed to Martinsburg. On the 3rd of July, the advance of the enemy under [Jubal] Early was encountered, and for some time successfully resisted, at Leetown, Va., by a small body of troops, of which the Tenth W. Va. was a part. On the 6th and 7th of the same month, it was engaged in a series of skirmishes at Maryland Heights, and for some days afterward was on the march with the troops then retreating before Early, who was pressing his invasion into Maryland, with the capture of the National Capital an avowed object. Engaged at Snicker's Ferry, Va., on the 17th, and on the 24th of July, at Winchester, Va. In the latter engagement, the Regiment was in the command of the lamented Col. Mulligan, who fell on that day, and the losses sustained prove how gallantly the Regiment held its portion of the line until the commanding General ordered a retreat; in the immediate front of the Regiment, the enemy in very heavy force, were more than once repulsed with terrible slaughter.

[Known as the Battle of Second Kernstown - In late June and early July 1864, Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early's Confederate army used the strategic Shenandoah Valley corridor to terrorize Maryland, defeat a Union army at Monocacy, and march on Washington, D.C. Only the diversion of reinforcements from the Army of the Potomac, bogged down in the trenches before Petersburg, turned back the invasion. Early returned to the Valley and achieved a decisive victory over George Crook's command at Second Kernstown on 24 July. He subsequently sent cavalry to burn Chambersburg, Pennsylvania on 30 July. These disasters forced Lt. Gen. U.S. Grant to take immediate action to solve the Valley problem. The VI Corps and elements of the XIX Corps were returned to the Valley and united with Crook's corps (called the Army of West Virginia). Additional cavalry units were diverted to the Valley. More importantly, Grant unified the various military districts of the region into the Middle Military District and appointed Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan as overall commander. Sheridan took command of the newly christened Army of the Shenandoah on 7 August at Harpers Ferry. Sheridan's leadership and his strongly reinforced army turned the tide against Confederate power in the Shenandoah Valley.]
In a small engagement at Berryville, Va., Sept. 3rd, 1864, and in the battle of "The Opequan," it suffered a heavy loss in killed and wounded, and was complimented on the field by Gen. Sheridan. At "Fisher's Hill," on the 22nd of September, the battle flag of the Tenth W. Va. was one of the first on the enemy's works, which were carried by assault by the Army of West Va. On the 13th of October, 1864, the Regiment was engaged at Strasburg, Va., and on the 19th of that month, in the great battle of "Cedar Creek"- in a word, the history of this Regiment during the months of September, October and November, 1864, is co-incident with that of Sheridan's Army in the victorious campaign of the Shenandoah Valley. The Regiment, with the rest of the First Infantry Division, Army of West Va., was ordered, December 19th, 1864, to Washington City, where it embarked for the Army of the James, arriving on the 25th of that month, and is now encamped on Chapin's Farm, about seven miles from the rebel capital.” Their duty continued as follows:

Duty in the trenches north of James River till March, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Moved to front of Petersburg March 28-29. Hatcher's Run March 30-31, and April 1. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Rice's Station April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Lynchburg April 12-15. March to Farmville and Burkesville April 15-19, thence to Richmond April 22-25. Duty near Richmond till August. Mustered out August 9, 1865.

Thomas was mustered out with his Regiment on 2 May 1865. He had been inducted with the rank of Corporal [a consequence of his age at the start of the war?] and discharged with the rank of Private. You'll read why below.

For most of the rest of his life Thomas worked as a miller and a farmer. He moved to Ritchie county, West Virginia in 1866, soon after being mustered out of the Army.

On 18 September 1869 Thomas J. Hissam, of Wood county, West Virginia, farmer, filed for an Invalid Pension, #148,212, based on his Civil War service. What follows is perhaps more than Thomas J. would like us to know about him (read also Samuel’s problems below to gain a perspective on a poor family trait – gold bricking). This may also explain how Thomas ended up in the Poor House.

Thomas J. Hissem’s Civil War Record

Enrolled: February 20, 1862, at Tyler Co., to serve 3 years. Mustered in: as Corporal on April 12, 1862, at Clarksburg, WV into: Company E, 10th Infantry Regiment of WV Volunteers - commanded by: Captain L.M. Marsh. Company was first recruited by Dr. T.M. Harris of Glenville, WV; and after it's organization in May , 1862, until June, 1864, it's service was mostly in West Virginia/Virginia. Henry B. Pitzer - Sergeant of company.

After traveling from the valley of VA - to Deep Bottom, VA, being in Winchester, VA Aug. 17; Battle of Opequan, Winchester, Sept. 19; Fisher's Hill Sept. 22; Cedar Creek Oct. 13; Battle of Cedar Creek Oct. 19; followed by duty in Shenandoah Valley until December. Moved to Washington DC, Dec. 19-20, thence to Bermuda Hundred Dec. 20-23. Duty in the trenches north of James River until March 1865. Appomattox Campaign from March 28-April 9, 1865.

While setting up camp for winter quarters in Deep Bottom Landing (north side of James River), VA, about December 6, 1864, Thomas, assisted by Hezakiah Garrison/Garritson, "was in the act of throwing a wet tent cloth over a ridge pole (8 ft. high) around noon; and in surging, straining and stretching myself, ruptured my stomach" resulting in a ventral hernia producing a rupture of the lower, center stomach ("making a hole large enough to insert his finger"). Lt. David Patterson (who had known him 20 years prior to enlistment - raised in same Tyler Co. neighborhood) was called immediately following injury and he was first examined (within 15 minutes) by Dr. J.R. Blair, Surgeon, (pronouncing the injury a "tumor"). Per Lt. D. Patterson: "he was whiny, but he was a good enough soldier. I never knew him to act dishonest". Per Noah Booker (camp mate): "The only thing I knew is sometimes he'd complain of the duty being too heavy ___ of doing more than his share, or something. So far as I knew him, I couldn't say anything about his honesty". Per Pharoah Booker - "Did not know him prior to enlistment. Have no recollection that he was complainer of anything special, he was generally complaining that he was not able for duty. He was old and ____ and very few of the boys ever had anything to say to him and he was always complaining and attending sick call so as to get excused from duty". The following morning he was admitted to the Field A.C. Hospital for one night before Richmond, Jan. 24, 1865 ("with tumor") and transferred Jan. 26, 1865, to Hospital at Point of Rocks, VA for 6 weeks before returning to his command. "Now unable to lift or perform manual labor so as to earn a living". Per Dr. E.D. Safford: "He states his is unable to conduct the ordinary operation of his farm, particularly in hot weather". Noted by various physicians as from 1/4 to 3/4 incapacitated (maybe/not permanent or incurable) for obtaining his subsistence by manual labor. Subsequently examined by: Dr. Hunt of Tyler Co., Dr. J.R. Loury? of Ritchie Co., and Dr. Martin of Cairo. Following injury, did some cooking and was not compelled to do manual labor. Was allowed to ride in ambulance or wagon and not made to walk. Per Samuel Hissam (b. 1839 - lived 4 miles from Long Reach, Tyler Co. in 1885) - a "half-brother" [Thomas was the son of Thomas & Isabell, Samuel of Thomas & Rachel] who drove the medical wagon for Dr. Blair and was placed in charge of wagon team as teamster. Attached to Battery "B", Dec. 27, 1863.

Appoints: Barna Powell of Parkersburg, WV as his attorneys - per verbal contract: to pay attorneys $25 if pension was received; nothing if not. Per various depositions: many knew of no injury received while in service. Post Master wrote July 1885, "Not wishing to do any one the least injury or prevent them getting all they should have in way of pensions, but in candor I must say that Thomas J. Hissem is of rather a low type of manhood, being lazy, trifling. And though I know nothing positive as to truthfulness, I should not like to vouch for it. Respectfully, D.M. Sharpnack, P.M.".

Treated by Dr. Joseph Hurt (family physician) of Tyler Co. for a fever, while at home on furlough in the summer of 1863.

Station of company Dec. 31, 1864 - Bermuda Hundred. Regiment was stationed at Camp Russell, VA - Dec. 10, 1864.

Discharged: mustered out with his company May 2, 1865, in Richmond, VA - no evidence of disability. Sent to Wheeling, WV for pay. Then came down Ohio River, along with Allen Riggs and Jesse Tuttle preeviously lived near Jesse Tuttle (company musician) in Tyler Co. - knew him for abt. 30 years), to Matamoras, Ohio; then getting off boat, came across country home - or - per Thomas Weekly: got off boat at Sisterville, Tyler Co.

Treated by Dr. J.R. Long/Loury for congestion of lungs around 1878-9.

Treated by Dr. E.D.J. B...., physician at Poor House of Wood Co., from July 19 - 23, 1885, for phlegmorous (mucus) Erysipelas (St. Anthony's Fire: a severe infectious disease in which the skin becomes swollen and inflamed - caused by a streptococcal organism); of which disease he died. "It first appeared in the mouth, near a carious molar tooth, and soon developed in face and head with deep ulceration at angle of maxillar (upper jaw) inferious. The symptom was accompanied with burning sensation, fever, nausea, etc."

In the 1870 census of the Harrisonville West post office, Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Thomas J. Hisam, a 51 year old farmer [1819], born in Virginia. Living with him were his wife, Williamina M., 40, and children, Theodore, 13, Joseph A., 11, Thomas J. Jr., 7, Phillip S., 4, and Emma J., 2.

In the 1880 census . . .

Thomas died on 25 July 1885 in the Poor House in Davisville, Wood county, West Virginia. The Poor House, or in some cases a Poor Farm, represented the institutional charity of the county. It was the duty of the Poor House overseer to see that the poor were supplied with necessary food and clothing and that they received proper medical attention. Able-bodied paupers were hired out to responsible citizens for their board and keep, in exchange for the work they were able to do. School-age children were required to attend school. Management of the Poor Houses was often haphazard and reports of maltreatment were occasionally confirmed.

In the 1890 Veterans Schedules of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virgina as Willow [garbled, but this undoubtedly refers to Williamina] M. Hyssam [sic], widow of Thomas J. Hyssam, Private, Company E, 10th Regiment, WV, Inf, Enlisted: 20 Feb 1862, Discharged: 2 May 1865, Length of Service: 3 years, 2 months, and 12 days.

See Ancestors of Jean Moore for more.

His children were,
(24) Theodore R. Hissam (1858)
(24) Joseph Abner Hissam (1860)
(24) Thomas J. Hissam Jr. (1863)
(24) Phillip S. Hissam (1866)
(24) Emma J. Hissam (1868)
(24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)
(24) Calvin W. Hissam (1883)

(24) Theodore R. Hissam (1858)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829)

He was born on 2 March 1858 in Tyler county, West Virginia. In the 1860 census of Russells Mills, Tyler county, Virginia as Theodore R. Hissam, 2, living with his parents, Thomas J. and Wilhelmina. In the 1870 census of the Harrisonville West post office, Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Theodore Hisam, 13, living with his parents, Thomas J. and Willow M.

In the 1880 census . . .

(24) Joseph Abner Hissam (1860)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829)

He was born on 29 April 1860 in Tyler county. In the 1860 census of Russells Mills, Tyler county, Virginia as Joseph A. Hissam, 3 months. In the 1870 census of the Harrisonville West post office, Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Joseph A. Hisam, 11.

In the 1880 census . . .

Joseph A. Hissem married Clara V. Lamasters on 23 June 1886 in Ritchie county, West Virginia. She was born in 1865. They had one child, born out of wedlock seemingly, then she apparently died because next, on 4 June 1893 at the age of 32, Joseph married Clara M. [Myrtle] Marshall in [Pike township] Ritchie county, West Virginia. She was 18, born on 23 January 1875 in Ritchie county. All the children listed below are with his second wife.

Joseph was the first member of this family to change the spelling from Hissam to Hissem, per his granddaughter, Leslie. He worked for the oil companies all of his life.

In the 1900 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Joseph A. Hissem, a 39 year old plumber (gas}. Living with him were his wife, Clara, 35 [January 1865], and children, Clarence, 6 [March 1894], John, 4 [October 1895], and Clyde, 2 [January 1898].

In the 1910 census of Grant township as Joseph A. Hissem, a 50 year old rig carpenter in the oil fields. It is clearly indicated that this was his second marriage. Living with him were his wife, Clara, 35, and children, Clarence, a 16 year old laborer with the B&O Lestion [Section?], John, 14, Clyde, 12, Raymond, 8, and Walter, 3.

In the 1920 census of of Grant township as Joseph Hissem, a 59 year old stillman at the oil refinery. Living with him were his wife, Clara, 44, and son, Walter S., 13.

In the 1930 census of Paw Paw, Marion county, West Virginia as as Joseph Hissem, a 69 year old proprietor of a road house. Living with him were his wife, Clara M., 55, and his son, Walter S., a 22 year old laborer at odd jobs.

Joseph Abner Hissem, the husband of Clara, died on 27 March 1947 in Rievesville, Marion county, West Virginia. He was 86 years 10 months and 27 days old, the son of Thomas Hissem - from the West Virginia Deaths Index, 1853-1973. Clara died in 1975. Joseph's tombstone, below

Joseph's children with Clara V. Lamaster was,
(25) Thomas Hissem (1886)


Joseph's children with Clara M. Marshall were,
(25) Clarence M. Hissem (1894)
(25) John Benton Hissem (1895)
(25) Clyde Willis Hissem (1897)
(25) Raymond Harold Hissem (1900)
(25) Walter Scott Hissem (1907)

(25) Thomas Hissem (1886)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860)

In the 1900 census of Walker township, Wood county, West Virginia as Thomas Hissem, 14 [January 1886]. He was listed as a grandson of Barbara Lamaster, a 60 year old widow [December 1839], who was the head of the household. I suspect that Thomas and his step-mother had a falling-out and it was thought wisest to have Thomas' grandmother raise the boy until he could go out on his own. Barbara was probably the widow of Elias Lemasters, in the 1880 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia. In the 1900 census Barbara had a daughter, Mary E. Maslow, a 22 year old married woman [February 1878], with 1 living child, Lucy M. Maslow, 1 [December 1898]. Barbara's son, George E., was also living in the house with his two children, Joseph and Blanche. He was, perhaps, a surrogate father for Thomas. These two children of Barbara's match with the 1880 census. However, I don't find Clara in that earlier census. Note that Thomas was born 6 months before his parents were married.

In the 1910 census of Clay township, Harrison county, West Virginia as Thomas Hissam, a 25 year old coal miner. He was of West Virginia, as were his parents. Living with him was his wife, Vella, 24, and sons Russel R., 3, and Boyd B., 8/12. Thomas and Vella had been married for 4 years.

Thomas Hissem registered for the draft on 12 September 1918. He was born on 6 January 1885 [sic], probably in West Virginia. He was 33 years old at the time of the draft, a motorman working for the Mahoning Valley Street Railway company. His nearest relative was his wife, Mrs. Belle May Hissem. He was living at 1212 Rigby street, Youngstown, Mahoning county, Ohio. He was described as of medium height and slender build, with brown eyes and hair.

In the 1920 census of Youngstown, Mahoning county, Ohio as Thomas Hissem, a 34 year old motor man in a street car. Living with him was his wife, Lella, 29, and children, Russell, 13, and William, 7. All were born in West Virginia. Are Vella, of 1910, Belle of 1918, and Lella, of 1920, the same woman; one who lies about her age?

In the 1930 census . . .

(26) Russell R. Hissem (1906)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Thomas Hissem (1886)

Russell R. Hissem was born on 5 November 1906. In the 1910 census of Clay township, Harrison county, West Virginia as Russel R. Hissam, 3. In the 1920 census of Youngstown, Mahoning county, Ohio as Russell Hissem, 13, born in West Virginia.

In the 1930 census . . .

He died on 27 December 1989 in Richmond, Chesterfield county, Virginia.

(26) Boyd B. Hissem (1909)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Thomas Hissem (1886)

In the 1910 census of Clay township, Harrison county, West Virginia as Boyd B. Hissam, 8/12. He apparently died young.

(26) William L. Hissem (1912)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Thomas Hissem (1886)

William L. Hissem was born in West Virginia on 12 October 1912. In the 1920 census of Youngstown, Mahoning county, Ohio as William Hissem, 7, born in West Virginia.

In the 1930 census . . .

While living in Mahoning county, Ohio he enlisted in the Army as a Private on 4 November 1943 at Cleveland. He had two years of High School and was classified as a ship fitter or boring mill operator. He was married. He died on 21 July 1994 at the age of 81 in Fort Lauderdale, Broward county, Florida.

(25) Clarence M. Hissem (1894)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860)

He was Born on 19 March 1894 in Ritchie county, West Virginia. In the 1900 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Clarence Hissem, 6 [March 1894]. In the 1910 census of Grant township as Clarence Hissem, a 16 year old laborer with the B&O Lestion [Section?]. This apparently has something to do with the B&O railroad.

He registered for the draft as Clarence M. Hissem on 6 May 1917 in Ritchie county, West Virginia, at the age of 23. He was single and living in Cairo at the time, working for the Goodyear Tire company in Akron as a rubber worker. He was tall, with a medium build, with brown eyes and hair. He served in the Army during World War I, but there is no record of where.

After the war he moved to Florida. In 1919 he married Doris Odel [last name unknown]. Clarence was 25 and Doris 19. Doris was born on 27 January 1900 in Indiana. In the 1920 censu of Miami, Dade county, Florida as Clarence Hissam, a 25 year old government mail clerk. Living with him was his wife, Doris, 20.

In the 1930 census of Miami, Dade county, Florida as Clarence Hissem, a 36 year old superintendent of the post office, residing on 37th Avenue. Living with him were his wife, Doris, 30, and his daughter, Helen, 9. Helen was born in Florida. Clarence owned his own home, which was valued at $3,000. He also owned a radio. He did not attend college. He was a veteran of World War 1.

"After thirty seven years Postal Service, Clarence M. Hissem, Supt. of Riverside Station is retiring to devote his time to beautiful flower gardesn. Mr. Hissem was appointed a Supervisor thirty three years ago, holding positions of Supt. Allapattah Br. [Fl], Coral Gables Br. [Fl] and Riverside Sta. [Ga]" - from "The Postal Supervisor" of 1956

Doris died on 26 December 1981 in Volusia county, Florida at the age of 81. Clarence died on 18 September 1986 in Miami, Florida [or in Volusia county?], at the age of 92.

(26) Helen Hissem (1921)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Clarence M. Hissem (1894)

She was born in Florida in about 1921.

(25) John Benton Hissem (1895)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860)

He was born on 3 October 1895 in Cairo, Ritchie county, West Virginia. In the 1900 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as John Hissem, 4 [October 1895]. In the 1910 census of Grant township as John Hissem, 14, still living at home.

John married unknown at the age of 21. John Benton Hissem, 22, registered for the draft on 5 June 1917 in Ritchie county. He was married and had a child, though he did not claim an exemption. He was described as tall, with a medium build, brown eyes and dark hair. He was a laborer working for the Warner Gouinilar [garbled] Asphalt company of Cairo, West Virginia.

His first wife died because John married Goldie in about 1923. She was 17 and born in West Virginia, as was her mother. Her father was from Ohio.

In the 1930 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as John Hissem, a 34 year old 'feeder' in the Silk mills. Living with him were his wife, Goldie, 30, and children, Wilford, 12, Wayne, 11, Charles, 9, Inez, 8, Robert, 7, Joseph, 4 11/12, and Ival [?], 1 2/12. Apparently the last two children belonged to Goldie. Note a slightly longer period between the birth of Robert and Joseph.

He died on 14 September 1967 in Petroleum [Cairo?], Ritchie county, West Virginia. Goldie died in 1979. Her obituary from 3 May 1979:

Mrs. Goldie Hissem

Mrs. Goldie Hissem, 79, of Rt. 1, Cairo, died last Wednesday morning in St. Joseph's Hospital, Parkersburg.

Mrs. Hissem was born in Cairo, a daughter of the late William H. and Clara Dotson Cantwell. She was a member of the Goose Creek Baptist Church.

Surviving are four sons, Wilfred L. Hissem of New Cumberland, Charles B. Hissem of Glendora, N.J., Robert E. and Joseph H. Hissem, both of Youngstown, O.; four daughters, Inez Hayes of Cairo, Mary Lou Swisher of Cairo, Ival Wagoner of New Cumberland; a brother, Dale Cantwell of Rt. 1, Cairo; a sister, Bessie Parks of Rt. 1, Cairo; 25 grandchildren and 24 great-grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by her husband, John B. Hissem; one son and six brothers.

John's children were,
(26) Wilford Hissem (1917)
(26) Wayne Nelson Hissem (1918)
(26) Charles Bernard Hissem (1920)
(26) Inez L. Hissem (1921)
(26) Robert E. Hissem (1923)
(26) Joseph H. Hissem (1925)
(26) Ival L. Hissem (1928)

(26) Wilford L. Hissem (1917)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895)

He was born on 15 May 1917. In the 1930 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Wilford Hissem, 12. Wilfred L. Hissem, who was born in 1917 in West Virginia, enlisted in the Army as a Private on 13 November 1941 at Huntington West, Virginia. He had one year of High School and was classified as a tractor or truck driver. He was single.

He married Betty [Beverly] R. Wagoner. She was born on 21 June 1926. Wilford died on 10 November 1979 and was buried in the New Cumberland cemetary. She died on 20 March 2001 and was buried in the New Cumberland cemetary.

(26) Wayne Nelson Hissem (1918)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895)

He was born on 20 June 1918. In the 1930 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Wayne Hissem, 11.

Wayne N. Hissem, of Ritchie county, West Virginia, enlisted in the Army as a Private on 17 June 1941 in Clarksburg West, Virginia. He had a grammar school education. He was single.

He married Lorrain E. Phillips of Harrisville, West Virginia. She was born on 2 October 1928, near Cairo, in Ritchie County. She owned and operated the former Lighthouse Restaurant in Cairo and was a graduate of Cairo High School. She was a member of the Goose Creek Baptist Church and served many years as the Sunday School superintendent. Wayne died in September 1977 in Cairo, Ritchie county, West Virginia. Lorraine, then living in Goose Creek, Cairo, died on 30 October 2002, in Parkersburg, at the age of 74.

I think he may have been known as Nelson Wayne Hissem.

Their children were,
(27) Gary Benton Hissem (1951)
(27) Jim Hissem
(27) Wayne Hissem Jr.
(27) William H. Hissem
(27) Rebecca Hissem
(27) Pamela Hissem


I also have a Chris Hissem, who is a grandson of Wayne and Lorraine, and a Ryan Hissem, also a grandson of Wayne and Lorraine who died young. I don't know which of the children, below, they belong to.

I'm not sure if this fits here [I put this here because of the Parkersburg link, but as a Hissam vice Hissem, this is probably wrong], but I have a Captain Brett Hissam, US Army, Commander, 512th Quartermaster Battalion. Associated with the South Parkersburg United Methodist Church of West Virginia. This is probably the church of his parents and of his youth. A Brett J. and Jennifer A. Hissam bought a home in Savannah, Georgia. His middle name appears to be James. From "FY05 Major, Army Selection Board Results," Seq #: 1491, Name: Hissam Brett James, Br: QM, CFD: 53, CF: IO. A member of the Theta Chi Fraternity. A 1991 graduate of ___?

(27) Gary Benton Hissem (1951)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895) (26) Wayne Nelson Hissem (1919)

He married Doris L. From his obituary: "Lt. Gary B. Hissem, 45, of South Summit street, Harrisville, West Virginia, died Thursday, 3 October 1996 in Petroleum, West Virginia. He was born in Harrisville, Ritchie County. Married to Wanda L. Mitchell. He was a lieutenant with the Ritchie County Sheriff's Department, had served in various capacities in law enforcement for the past 20 years, and was cited for meritorious and faithful service on numerous occasions. He enjoyed hunting and fishing. He was a member of the WV Deputy Sheriff’s Association and the Goose Creek Baptist Church. Surviving, in addition to his mother, are his wife, Wanda L. Mitchell Hissem; a son, Gary B. Hissem, Jr., of Harrisville; a stepdaughter, Angel D. Ross of Harrisville; three brothers, Jim Hissem of Salem, WV, Wayne Hissem of San Diego, CA, and William Hissem of Cairo, WV; two sisters, Becky Carder of Cairo, and Pamela Forshey of Waverly, WV; and several nieces and nephews." In separate news reports it appears Gary was killed by the jealous husband.

(28) Gary Benton Hissem Jr. (1977)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895) (26) Wayne Nelson Hissem (1919) (27) Gary Benton Hissem (1951)

(27) Jim Hissem (c1950)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895) (26) Wayne Nelson Hissem (1919)

Of Salem, West Virginia. There is a Dr. James Hissem, DDS in Salem. He married JoAnne Lambert. Both appear to be WVU graduates, Jim with a DDS in 1975 and JoAnne with a BS in 1973. They raise Tennessee walking horses and miniature horses. From the website of West Virginia University School of Dentristry Faculty and Staff:

"Jimmie D. Hissem, DDS
Salem, WV

Hello, I am Jimmie Hissem and I graduated West Virginia University School of Dentistry in 1975.

My office address is Route 1 Box 75-2, PO Box 71, Salem, WV 26426 and the office phone number is (304) 782-3393. There are 5 operatories, a lab, sterilization area, and employee lounge. The operatories have standard units and x-ray equipment and a computerized office. There is 1 hygienist, 1 office personnel and 2 assistants. They are trained on site with 20 years experience. We work a 4 day week, practice sit down dentistry to a point and provide basic restorative care. We cannot accept left handed students.

Salem has a rural population of approximately 2000. We serve Harrison, Doddridge, Tyler and Ritchie Counties and surrounding areas.

My personal philosophy is to be ethical, present all options. The patient makes decisions of treatment based on their financial resources.

To reach our office take I-79 South, right onto US 50W(Clarksburg) 10 miles; take Salem Road Exit (left turn), office is 100 years off exit in medical complex on right. The distance from Morgantown is 60 miles and should take 1 hour. My e-mail address is jhissem@verizon.net."

(28) James Preston Hissom

I place James here only because he attended West Virginia Universtiy, like Jim above. "HISSOM, JAMES PRESTON. "World and Being in Wordsworth's Prelude."" An unpublished doctoral dissertation, West Virginia Univeristy, 1984.

(27) Wayne Hissem Jr. (c1952)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895) (26) Wayne Nelson Hissae (1919)

Of Ramona, San Diego county, California. He is married to Jacky [Estes?]. Wayne was a GMG3 in the US Navy onboard DD-945 in 1969-1970. 760 789 3042

(28) Scott Wayne Hissem (1979)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895) (26) Wayne Nelson Hissem (1919) (27) Wayne Hissem Jr. (c1952)

There is a Scott Wayne Hissem who was born in San Diego, California on 6 October 1979. His mother was an Estes. I believe he wrote the following at Ancestry.com.

Scott Hissem: "i have family in west virginia with the name hissem. they reside in cairo in ritchie county, my grandfathers name is nelson wayne hissem. i hope this helps...i can not find any info for my family, we may be related, do you have info???"

(27) William H. Hissem (1951)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895) (26) Wayne Nelson Hissem (1919)

Of Cairo, West Virginia. His obituary,

"William H. Hissem, 59, of Cairo, died July 27, 2011, at Louis A. Johnson Medical Center, Clarksburg.

He was born Nov. 27, 1951 in Harrisville, the son of the late Wayne Nelson and Evelyn Lorraine Phillips Hissem. He was a U.S. Army Veteran. He worked as transportation director for the Ritchie County Integrated Family Services and was a member of Goose Creek Baptist Church.

He is survived by his wife, Janice E. Rollins Hissem; brothers, Dr. J.D. Hissem of Salem and Wayne Nelson Hissem of Ramona, Calif.; sisters, Becky L. Carder of Cairo and Pamela S. Forshey of Waverly; and several nieces and nephews.

In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his brother Gary B. Hissem.

Memorial services will be held 4 p.m. Saturday at Raiguel Funeral Home, Cairo with Rev. Doug Guinn officiating. Friends may visit with the family from 3-4 p.m." - from the Parkersburg News and Sentinel

(27) Rebecca Hissem
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895) (26) Wayne Nelson Hissem (1919)

Of Cairo. She married a Carter.

(27) Pamela Hissem
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895) (26) Wayne Nelson Hissem (1919)

Of Waverly, West Virginia. She married a Forshey.

(26) Charles Bernard Hissem (1920)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895)

Charles Bernard Hissem was born on 15 February 1920. In the 1930 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Charles, 9.

Charles was a veteran, an MM1 in the Navy, serving from 18 April 1946 to 10 April 1961. An MM is a Machinists Mate. They operate and maintain steam turbines and reduction gears used for ship propulsion and auxiliary machinery such as turbogenerators, pumps and oil purifiers. They also maintain auxiliary machinery outside of main machinery spaces, such as electrohydraulic steering engines and elevators, refrigeration plants, air conditioning systems and desalinization plants.

Charles married Henrietta Pearl.

His last known address was Route 2, Box 127 Grafton, West Virginia. He died on 25 December 1990 and was buried in the West Virginia National cemetary, Grafton, Taylor county, Plot 2, 0, 609.

(26) Inez L. Hissem (1921)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895)

In the 1930 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Inez Hissem, 8. An Inez L. Hissem, 47, married Fort B. Means, 52, on 11 April 1969 in McLennan county, Texas.

(26) Robert E. Hissem (1923)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895)

A Robert E. Hissem was born on 12 June 1923. In the 1930 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Robert Hissem, 7. He died on 18 February 1990.

(26) Joseph H. Hissem (1925)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895)

Named for his grandfather. A Joseph H. Hissem was born on 20 October 1925 in West Virginia. In the 1930 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Joseph Hissem, 4 11/12. He died on 23 December 1982 in Youngstown, Mahoning county, Ohio.

(26) Ival Hissem (1928)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) John Benton Hissam (1895)

Ival L. Hissem was born on 20 June 1928. In the 1930 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Ival [?] Hissem, 1 2/12. She married John F. Wagoner. She died on 5 February 1989 and was buried in the New Cumberland cemetary, New Cumberland, West Virginia. John followed her on 8 April 1989.

(25) Clyde Willis Hissem (1897)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860)

Clyde W. Hissem was born on 6 Janaury 1897 in Cairo, Ritchie county, West Virginia. In the 1900 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Clyde Hissem, 2 [January 1898]. In the 1910 census of Grant township as Clyde Hissem, 12.

In the 1920 census as Clyde W. [H in Ancestry.com] Hissem, he was a 22 year old Marine, living at the Marine Barracks Quantico, in Dumfries, Prince William county, Virginia. This is just south of the Washington D.C. complex.

He married Helen "Ellen" Irene Cunningham on 13 July 1921. She was born on 24 August 1901.

In 1930 census of Keyser township, Mineral county, West Virginia as Clyde Hissem, a 31 year old state policeman. Living with him were his wife, Ellen, 28, and children, Allen, 7, Betty, 1 2/12, and Margaret, 2/12.

He was employed in the State Police through at least 1934.

Clyde W. Hissem - Trooper - Charleston. "The investigation was conducted by Sergeant WC Huff and Trooper CW Hissem, in company with Mr. JJ Massey, assistant Fire Marshal. They arrived at the scene of the fire about an hour and a half after it had been discovered." - from "Report of the Deparment of Public Safety (West Virginia State Police)" of 1932
In 1935 he became a member of the US Alcohol Tax Unit of the U.S. Treasury Department, that is he was a “revenuer” going after all the stills up in the mountains. This organization is now known as the Bureau of Alchohol, Tobacco and Firearms. He was mentioned in a newspaper article of 10 November 1934 as a State Trooper and on 16 April 1935 as an Investigator for the Treasurey Department. The Charleston Daid Mail of 19 October 1939 announced that Clyde would take charge of the Huntingdon office of the Alcohol Tax Unit.

The Bureau of Alchohol, Tobacco and Firearms

As early as 1791, revenue acts taxed both alcohol and tobacco and created the offices of tax inspector, collector, and supervisor. During the next century, the offices changed names as frequently as the tax rates changed, but the federal interest in raising revenues from alcohol and tobacco remained strong.

After the Civil War, revenue agents battled moonshiners throughout the South in some of the bloodiest opposition ever to federal law enforcement. Revenue agents and deputy U.S. marshals by the score were killed as they roamed the hills and hollows searching out illicit stills. Prohibition changed the government's focus from taxing whiskey to banning it, yet the revenue agent's job remained as dangerous.

Spawned by the 1933 repeal of Prohibition, the Alcohol Tax Unit was established as a tax-collecting branch within the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). In 1951, the Alcohol Tax Unit began enforcing federal taxes on tobacco, thus prompting a name change in 1952 to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax Division. The 1968 passage of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act and the Gun Control Act expanded the IRS unit's jurisdiction to the criminal use of explosives and bombs.

In the post-war period he was kept busy finding and destroying German and Japanese firearms brought into the state by ex-soldiers. Ellen died on 15 June 1972 in Huntington, Cabell county, West Virginia. Clyde died on 25 June 1974 in Huntington. Their children were,
(26) Lieutenant Colonel Alan Howard Hissem (1922)
(26) Betty Hissem (1929)
(26) Margaret J. Hissem (1930)

(26) Lieutenant Colonel Alan Howard Hissem (1922)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Clyde Willis Hissem (1897)

Is his name Allen or Alan? He was born on 6 July 1922 in Huntington, Randolph county, West Virginia. He was 7 years old at the time of the 1930 census.

At the outbreak of World War II Alan was 19 years old and would serve, eventually, as a Navigator in an Air Force bomber. Looking at the records of another Navigator of the same age from this period, even if Alan had gone to sign up right after the war began, he might have spent many months in school before being called up. The military, though desperate for men, were not ready to receive them, especially in those fields requiring extensive technical training, like aviation. See Navigating Through World War II for one Navigator's story of the war years.

Alan would have received basic military training, probably at a local college, and aviation ground school, then been sent to one of the many new training fields that were being built across the southern tier of the nation for his aerial instruction.

Private Alan H. Hissem, Army Reserve, enlisted [I believe this was a re-enlistment] on 6 January 1943 at the San Antonio Aviation Cadet Center in Texas. He was born in West Virginia in 1922 and was listed as a resident of King William county, Virginia. He had one year of college and was single, without dependents.

He was trained as a Navigator on the Boeing B-17 "Flying Fortress" bomber and commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Army Air Force (USAAF).

The Navigator

There are ten men in a B-17 bomber crew: Pilot, Co-Pilot, Flight Engineer, Radio Operator, Bombadier, Navigator, 2 Waist gunners, Tail gunner, and the Ball Turret gunner. With the exception of the Pilot and Co-Pilot, all crew members had guns they manned when being engaged by enemy fighters.

The Navigator directed the flight of the aircraft from departure to destination and return. He had to know the exact position of the aircraft at all times with the aid of pilotage, dead reckoning, radio navigation, or celestial navigation. In order to fulfil his duties as navigator, he also had to be familiar with instrument calibration, pre-flight planning, and flight debriefing. Furthermore, the navigator operated and serviced one of the machine guns located near his station.

See the web site of "Sentimental Journey", a flying history museum, for a description and photos of the Navigator's position and duties on the B-17

Alan arrived in England on 12 February 1944 and was assigned to the 339th Bomber Squadron (Heavy), in the 96th Bomb Group, stationed at Snetterton Heath, Norfolk. The 96th was part of the 45th Combat Wing of the “mighty” 8th Air Force. The 8th was under the command of the great Jimmy Doolitte. It was the 8th's mission to bring the war to the German heartland through long-range precision daylight aerial bombardment. They did this in the face of a barrage of intense anti-aircraft artillery and fierce enemy fighter aircraft attack. They targeted weapons manufacturing facitlities, military concentrations, industrial sites, power stations and transportation centers using the "famed" Norden bombsight. Through its use they were supposed to achieve great accuracy, but the poor technology of the day meant that civilian populations living near manufacturing centers suffered greatly. They flew their missions in daylight, despite the greater risks, to make the best use of the Norden sight. The British, in contrast, flew their missions at night and their accuracy was even poorer.

The 96th flew 300 missions from Snetterton Heath between December 1943 and December 1945, and had one of the 8th Air Force's highest loss rates. They were the lead group on many missions including the great Schweinfurt raid of 14 October 1943. They flew both the B-17F and, later, the better protected B-17G. See Eighth Air Force Historical Society for a color drawing of how the 96th's aircraft were painted, and a history of the Group.

USAAF Snetterton Heath, Station 138

From May 1943 to December 1945 the following squadrons were located at Snetterton Heath, pictured at the right, the 337th, 338th and 339th Bomb Squarons. See Snetterton Heath for a brief history of the field, photos, and its current state. Today this is a race track.

See the movie "Twelve O'Clock High" for an accurate picture of airfields of the time and the living conditions of the men. The movie "Memphis Belle" is also quite good in this regard.

Upon arriving at Snetterton Heath Alan would have been assigned to a crew and an aircraft. While he could have been integrated into an established B-17 crew that had lost a member, it appears this was a totally new crew, with no previous combat experience. Conceivably this could have been a crew that had trained together in the United States, but I don't know this. The crew's pilot, and leader, was Lt. Hanish.

In those days aircrew usually flew the same aircraft on every mission and these aircraft were serviced by a dedicated groundcrew of maintenance men. Alan's aircraft was serial number (S/N) 42-30369. From a posting on the "384th BG - Grafton Underwood" forum at ArmyAirForces.com/forum by "Dakota" from Lincoln, England,

"The "Mighty Eigth [sic] War Manual" by Roger A Freeman shows a nose picture of a B17F S/No. 42-30369 named "Daisy June IV" with "Bomb Boogie" painted below the name. It also has 15 bomb cheverons painted on the nose as well. This aircraft belonged with the 339BS/96BG . . . The details of this aircraft are shown in "The B.17 Flying Fortress Story" by Roger A Freeman under its serial number."
If this is true, then Alan's crew inherited an aircraft from another crew that had completed their prescribed number of missions and been rotated state-side.

The B-17F

An improvement on the previous B-17E, the first B-17F (41-24340) flew on 30 May 1942. The B-17F's greatest weakness, as German fighter pilots quickly discovered and exploited, was a blind zone below and in front of the aircraft nose where no gun could properly aim. To address this additional flexible machine gun installations were fitted in the nose, firing from extra sockets cut into the nose cone or from windows cut into the side of the nose. The chin turrent gun, added to the B-17G, finally solved this problem. Armor plate and flak curtains on the B-17F were also not well-positioned to protect the crew against frontal attacks. When hit from the front by machine gun or cannon fire, the crew of the B-17 was relatively unprotected. Hasty modifications were made in the field in an attempt to beef up the armor protection, but were not entirely successful.

S/N 42-30369 was a Boeing built aircraft, production block B-17F-100-BO. B-17's were also produced at the Douglas and Lockheed-Vega plants, a total of 3,405 being built. "Daisy Jane IV" "Bomb Boogie," Alan's aircraft, is pictured to the left. I'll guess that the aircraft had two names because, while its first crew gave it one name, the second added another without erasing the first. This is not to say that the aircraft was painted this way when Alan Hissem was onboard because I do not know the date of the photograph.

By the way, there was a "Daisy June" in the 546th Squadron, 384th Bomb Group, pilot Lt. Decker, and a "Daisy June II," B-17F, S/N 42-5879, in the 548th Squadron, 385th Bomb Group, pilot Lt. Hoffman. I haven't found a "Daisy June III." "Bomb Boogie" was the name of at least three other "Forts."

Alan's crew would have taken a few non-combat flights in "Daisy June IV," getting to know the aircraft, each other, local flight rules, and the English weather. The latter could be a shock to crews trained in the American desert southwest. One bombardier wrote, "Again we neared the English coast to find it closed in, and again we had to let down through that damned soup for which England is famous."

By March 1944 Alan would have been ready to start flying combat missions. Note that it was in this month that P-51 "Mustangs," the greatest American fighter plane of the war, first escorted B-17's all the way to their target in Berlin. No previous fighter had the fuel to go so far. With this added proctection American losses would decline dramatically. Herman Goering, the German Air Marshall, later said that when he saw "Mustangs" over Berlin, "he knew the jig was up."

The strategic mission emphasis in February and March of 1944 was the Luftwaffe and the German aircraft manufacturing industry. The 8th Air Force launched massive raids against plants and airfields in such places as Leipzig, Augsburg, Regensburg, Schweinfurt, and Stuttgart. American losses were heavy, but the Luftwaffe's strength never recovered from these massive blows.

To get a feel for what it must have been like to be on a bomber mission, I'll quote from one of the participants, Charles Hudson, a bombadier:

- "Ahead there were Fortresses as far as the naked eye could reach, in all we must have had a thousand bombers up that day, and as many fighters."
- "Finally we were at twenty-six thousand feet, and the extreme cold was almost unbearable. The thermometer registered minus fifty-three degrees and we were all suffering immensely."
- "All the way down the run the flak was popping around our ship, and I was only too happy to cage my gyro at bombs away, and turn the controls back to the pilot."
- "There were a few stragglers, and now and then they would get an attack, but the only one I saw that got hit, was a B-24 that was straggling from the Wing ahead of us. Two F.W.'s made a pass at him, and within a few seconds he was in flames, and went crashing into the ground with a terrific explosion."

On 16 March 1944 the 96th was sent to attack a large airfield north of Augsburg, Germany. This was probably the Messerschmitt works. Augsburg was their headquarters. Both the rocket-powered Me163 and jet-powered Me262 were designed and intially built there. It was the second combat mission for the crew of "Daisy June Iv." While they made it to the target and dropped their bombs, the aircraft had already been hit, and one engine was out. On the way out of the target, just south of Stuttgart, they were attacked by rocket firing German fighters [these were probably twin-engined Me110's or Me210's]. Like lions hunting on the savanna, the weak were always the first to be targeted. "Daisy June IV" went down about 40 miles from the French border. They may have been trying to make it to the Swiss border.

It was not really so strange that Alan's crew was lost so soon after their arrival in England. It is, rather, typical. The highest fatality rate in warfare occurs during the first few missions. The learning curve is steep and if an airman could survive those first encounters they had a good chance of making it through to the end. Their aircraft was the only one lost by the 96th Bomb Group on that day.
From the March 1944 "USAAF Missing Air Crew Report (MACR)",

MACR - 3421, Date - 440316, Aircraft Type - B-17, AAF S/N - 42-30369, Group - 96, Sqdn - 339, Pilot - Hanish.
From a posting on a "96th BG - Snetterton" forum at Armyairforces.com/forum, Peter Rechtsteiner, of Germany, wrote,
"I try to help an eye-witness of a B-17 crash to find out if anybody of the crew is still alive. The aircraft crashed on 16.03.44 near a small village named "Dittishausen" in the South of Germany (Black Forest). 7 men of the crew survived. I think it was of the 96.BG, probable the 42-30369, on the way back of Augsburg."
Dittishausen is in the extreme southwest of Germany, in that corner of the country between France and Switzerland. The Rhine river, and Strasbourg on the other side, is just to the west.

Alan was captured by the Germans and became a prisoner of war for the remainder of the war. The Charleston Daily News of 7 June 1944 carried the news of his internment.

Official record of 2nd Lt Hissem’s Last Mission

"Twenty three (23) A/C of this 96th Group were airborne and 19 dispatched to attack an airfield 7 miles north of Augsburg, Germany (center of enemy war production), visually and the center of the city if by PFF [a method of blind navigation]. 10/10ths cloud at primary occasioned undercast procedure. The 96th Group flew high with the 388th lead and 452nd low. The 45th Combat Wing lead with 13th Combat Wing on this target. Nineteen (19) A/C attacked the target. Three A/C returned early due to mechanical failure. Briefed route was flown with only slight deviations. 772XM47AI bombs [these were 100 pound fragmentation bombs] were dropped on PFF with unobserved results although some crews reported smoke after bombing. E/A [enemy aircraft] were encountered from Chalons, France [interestingly, Chalons is near Bordeaux, in Southern France, so the group took a circuitous route to their target] to the target and return to the coast. The heaviest began in the Chalons, Strasbourg and target areas, with rockets from about five o'clock into the formation. Other attacks were by FW190s and ME109s in the areas as given and lasted from 3 to 10 minutes. Most attacks were from 5 to 7 o'clock, both high and low. Our claims were 3 destroyed, 3 probables and 3 damaged. Flak was encountered at Strasbourg; a moderate barrage at target, ahead and to the right, and to the right at Abbeville coming out. *** A/C #369, Lt. Hanish, 339th squadron was seen to have one prop feathered at target and last seen going down under control 40 miles from the French coast [border] out with 2 engine failures. Six (6) to eight (8) chutes were reported. Eighteen A/C returned safely to base". "The crew were only on their second mission to Augsburg to attack a large German airfield north of the city. Their aircraft was the only one lost by the 96th BG on that day. They were attacked by rocket firing German fighters just south of Stuttgart while they were on their way back from the target. The aircraft crashed at Balingen, Germany [Balingen is north of Dittishausen, halfway to Stuttgart]".

On 16 March 1944 Alan was reported as MIA in Germany by the Air Force, two months after going overseas. On 5 May 1944 the German government reported that he was a Prisoner of War at POW Camp #3787 Stalag Luft, short for Stammlager Luft, or Permanent Camp for Airmen.

Life as a POW

Alan was first transported to a "Dulag Luft" (transit/processing camp) located near Oberursel (near Frankfurt) at the foot of the Taunus Mountains. Here he and his crewmates were registered as POW's and interrogated. After a stay of approximately 1-2 weeks, the prisoners were sent to a transit camp and then on to one of the permanent camps. The men were packed into box cars and began the 300 mile trip to Sagan, Germany, now Zagan, Poland, some 100 miles southeast of Berlin.

This was Stalag Luft 3. It was originally built in May 1942. This Stalag, pictured at right, was famous for the number of attempted escapes. The biggest, led by Major Roger Bushell, took place on 24 March 1944, not long before Alan would have arrived. Eighty prisoners made it outside through a 111-meter tunnel dug 10 meters below the surface. After the escape was revealed and the alarm was raised, four prisoners were caught by the tunnel outlet. Following the manhunt only three of the prisoners managed to avoid the traps and chases, the remaining 73 being caught by the Nazis. The movie "The Great Escape" was based on this event.

On the west side of the camp a large area, called the Kommandantur, was reserved for the Germans. In the northeast corner was located the Volager, which contained facilities for the prisoners, including the "cooler," sick quarters, bathhouse, coal shed, etc., as well as several barracks for Russian prisoners who were used as camp labor. The Center Compound accommodated approximately 1600 prisoners. It contained 2 cookhouses and 12 barracks, each 120 feet long and 30 feet wide. There were two main rooms in each barrack, each accommodating 70 men, and two small rooms at each end of the barrack with a little kitchen stove and a night latrine. There was also a large sports field. The buildings were very poorly constructed; the roofs leaked, lights and heating fixtures were quite inadequate, and the repairs were generally neglected.

17 January 1945 - German news broadcasted unprecedented Russian advances toward the camp.
25 January 1945 - News arrived that a Russian spearhead had reached Steinau, 48 miles east of Stalag III.
27 January 1945 - The Germans announced that the camp would be evacuated and within 30 minutes the men were to begin assembling at the front gates. West and North compounds went first with Center Compound leaving around 4:30 AM. Snow was falling and an estimated 6 inches had already accumulated. The temperature hovered between 10 and 20 degrees, with high winds. All prisoners had to leave a great deal behind. It was estimated that between 25,000 and 50,000 Red Cross food parcels were left, and that more than 2.5 million cigarettes were abandoned in East and North compounds alone. The prisoners ate only what food they were able to secure and carry with them. The leading column (South compound) had to travel long distances with only brief rest stops, so succeeding groups would have room, while always in fear of advancing Russian forces. The mMarched nearly 35 miles before reaching Muskau where they found rest in a brick factory and a heating plant. All compounds followed the same route. South compound then left Muskau and marched 15.5 miles to Spremberg. About 15% of the men could not walk without assistance. The prisoners from Center compound found refuge in Halbau, but the church and attached buildings they occupied were so small that no one got any rest. The next day they marched some ten miles to the village of Barrau, where they rested on 30 January. They stayed in Muskau until 3 February. They then marched to Graustein and spent the night in barns. On 4 February, the eighth day of their journey, the men from Center Compound arrived in Spremberg and completed their trip. The prisoners boarded trains, 40-50 men crowded with several guards in each boxcar, and were sent to other detainment camps. South and Center compounds went to Stalag VII A near Moosburg.

29 April 1944 - The camp was liberated by American troops. The POW's were then flown out of Germany to transit camps near Le Harve, France.

By the way, the play and movie, "Stalag 17," was based on a true incident. The Germans asked for officers to help them run Stalag 17, a Non-Commissioned Officers (NCO), i.e. Sergeants, Compound in Krembs. An officer from Stalag 3 volunteered with the idea of helping the NCO's organizing escapes. That plan failed because he discussed his ideas with an American NCO who turned out to be a German undercover agent.

Alan married Jane Wells Jarrell, on 28 July 1947. She was also born on 3 August 1923 in Huntington, Cabell county, West Virginia.

After the war Alan attended the Aeronautical University in Chicago earning an Aeronautical Engineering Degree. After this he was assigned to the 3535th Bombardment Training Wing, at Mather Air Force Base, California to continue his career. His career assignments:

Sept. 10, 1946 - Promoted to 1st Lieutenant
August 23, 1952 - Promoted to Captain
September 21, 1957 - - 11th TAC Recon. Sq. PACAF - Flt. ECM Officer - Yokota AFB, Japan
Aug. 1958 - - 11th TAC Recon. Sq. PACAF - Flt. Elect. Warfare Officer - Yokota AFB
Dec. 1958 - - Hq. 67th TAC Recon. Wing PACAF - Wg. EW Plans Officer - Yokota AFB
July 1959 - - Hq. 67th TAC Recon. Wing PACAF - Ch. Elect. Warfare Div. - Yokota AFB
June 20, 1960 - HqNORAD & CONAD - 4608th Sept. Sq. ADC - Ent AFB, Colorado Springs, CO
June 1960 - ECM Staff Off., SysBr, Environment Div, Dir/Ops,DCS/O. HqNORAD
November 4, 1960 - Promoted to Major
Jan. 1962 - Electronic Warfare Officer & Directorate of Operations - Opr. Elect.Warfare Div.
April 15, 1965 - Hq. USAFE - 7260thz Spt. Grp. - Chief Elect. Collections Div., Directorate of Collections, Deputy Chief of Staff, Intelligence USAFE Lindsey AS, Germany
May 17, 1965 - Lindsey AS, Wiesbaden, Germany (7260th Support Gp USAFE) - August 16, 1968 Officer assigned duty as Chief, Electronic Collection Division, Directorate of Collections, DCS/I
November 4, 1967 - Promoted to Lt. Colonel (permanent)
August 17, 1968 - Hq 7th AF - PACAF - Tan Son Nhut AFB, Viet Nam - Dep. Director and Directorate of Operational Intelligence - Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Hq. 7th AF (previously: Chief SAM/ELINT Br. / Chief, Defense Analysis Div.)
Sept. 1969 - Sept. 1972 - MAJCOM Chief Combat Capabilities Div. - HQ Tactical Air Cmd.- Langley AFB, VA
Sept. 1, 1972 - MAJCOM Assistant Director of OP Intelligence, Intel. Hq. TAC - Langley AFB, VA
July 1, 1973 - MAJCOM Assistant Director of OP Intelligence, OL INO Hq. TAC - Langley AFB, VA
August 31, 1974 – Retirement

He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel. Just a year later he died, on 22 August 1975 in Newport News, Virginia. I had previously found a stray reference on the internet to a Major Hissem visiting a Norad site, now I know who that was.

Jane next married Lieutenant Colonel Paul Edward Gerhart. Jane Jarrell Hissem Gerhart died on 8 November 2008 in Hampton, South Carolina. Her obituary:

November 12, 2008 Jane Jarrell Hissem Gerhart, 85, died Saturday afternoon, Nov. 8, 2008, of lung cancer. Born Aug. 3, 1923, in Huntington, W.Va., the daughter of Boyd and Ella (Taylor) Jarrell. As an Air Force wife and homemaker, Jane lived all over the world before moving to Newport News in 1969. She was an active volunteer for the American Red Cross in numerous Armed Forces hospitals for over 40 years, last serving at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton. Jane was preceded in death by her parents; her brother, Boyd Jarrell; first husband, Lt. Col. Alan H. Hissem; son, Alan Timothy Hissem, all of Huntington, W.Va.; and second husband, Lt. Col. Paul Gerhart of Newport News.

His children were,
(27) Alan Timothy Hissem (1948)
(27) Alan Howard Hissem Jr. (c1950)
(27) Leslie Ann Hissem (c1952)

(27) Alan Timothy Hissem (1948)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Clyde Willis Hissem (1897) (26) Lieutenant Colonel Alan Howard Hissem (1897)

He was born on 26 March 1948 in Huntington, West Virginia. He died on 20 August 1950.

(27) Alan Howard Hissem Jr. (c1956)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Clyde Willis Hissem (1897) (26) Lieutenant Colonel Alan Howard Hissem (1897)

A website mentions Alan as an alumni of the H.H. Arnold High School of Wiesbaden, Germany in 1963 - perhaps they meant Junior High. This was while his father was assigned to USAFE. I also have an Alan Hissem who attended Debigh High School in Newport News, Virginia from 1970 to 1974. So Alan was born while his father was stationed at the nearby Langley Air Force Base.

Alan married Penelope "Penny" Greene Johnson.

In 2006 a reunion newsletter said that, "Alan is working on building up his own business Moonlight by Design in the Hampton, VA area. He specializes in special effects outdoor lighting. If you need his services his information is: Moonlight by Design, moonlightbydesign@cox.net, 757-224-3862. Penny and Alan are planning to travel more in 2006, spend more time together and hopefully Penny will be able to retire within the next year. A trip to Vegas in March could be the start to a great year if they get the “elbow action” right!"

(27) Leslie Ann Hissem (c1952)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Clyde Willis Hissem (1897) (26) Lieutenant Colonel Alan Howard Hissem (1897)

She married Kevin Wayne Youngs. Living in Catonsville, Baltimore county, Maryland.

(26) Betty L. Hissem (1929)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Clyde Willis Hissem (1897)

She was born on 22 September 1928 in Morgantown, West Virginia. In 1930 census of Keyser township, Mineral county, West Virginia as Betty Hissem, 1 2/12. She married Jack L. Morris.

Betty died on 20 April 2010, at the age of 81. Her obituary:

BETTY L. HISSEM MORRIS, 81, of Huntington, died Tuesday, April 20, 2010, in Hubbard Hospice House, Charleston, W.Va. Funeral services will be conducted 12:30 p.m. Saturday, April 24, 2010, at Chapman's Mortuary, Huntington, by the Rev. W. Keith Creasy. Burial will be in Woodmere Memorial Park, Huntington. Betty was born Sept. 22, 1928, in Morgantown, W.Va., a daughter of the late Clyde W. and Helen Cunningham Hissem. She was a member of the former Beverly Hills Baptist Church. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jack L. Morris, and one brother, Alan Hissem. Survivors include two daughters, Karen Grove of Charleston and Sharon Berezo and husband John of Milton; three grandsons, David Scott Grove and wife Shawna, Shawn Michael Grove and wife Ann and Tom Napier; one granddaughter, Ashley Napier Jones and husband Caleb; one great-grandson, Stephen Thomas Jones; and one sister, Peggy Hissem Theis of Huntington. The family would like to express a special thank-you to the staff of Chateau Grove Assisted Living for mother's care during her stay.

(26) Margaret J. Hissem (1930)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Clyde Willis Hissem (1897)

Peggy. In the 1930 census of Keyser township, Mineral county, West Virginia as Margaret Hissem, 2/12. She married (1) John Theis and then (2) Walter Moore - or do I have this backwards? Of Huntingdon, West Virginia.

(25) Raymond Harold Hissem (1900)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860)

He was born on 21 July 1900 [1901?] 1 in Cairo, West Virginina. In the 1910 census of Grant township as Raymond Hissem, 8. Raymond Harold Hissem registered for the draft on 12 September 1918. He was 18 years old at the time, a pipe line worker for the Warner I[garbled] company. His nearest relative was Clara Hissem, of Cairo, West Virginia. He was described as of medium height and slender build, with brown eyes and Da[garbled] hair. He died on 19 October 1918.

(25) Walter Scott Hissem (1907)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860)

He was born on 27 January 1907. In the 1910 census of Grant township as Walter Hissem, 3. In the 1920 census of of Grant township as Walter S. Hissem, 13. In the 1930 census of Paw Paw, Marion county, West Virginia as Walter S. Hissem, a 22 year old laborer at odd jobs, still living with his parents.

Sometime after this he married Hannah Reva Matheny. She was born on 20 August 1902.

Walter S. Hissem, of West Virginia, enlisted in the Army as a Private on 15 September 1943 in Ohio at Fort Hayes Columbus. He had a grammar school education and was classified as a tractor or truck driver. He was married.

Walter's tombstone indicated that he was a "PFC 447 QM TRK, CO, QMC," that is, a Private First Class, of the 447th Quarter Master Amphibian Truck Company, Quarter Master Corps, U.S. Army. This unit took part in the invasion of Saipan during the Second World War as a component of the Army's XXIV Corps Artillery. While the assault on Saipan was a U.S. Marine operation, they were supported by a number of Army units, including the 447th. They used the Dukw vehicle, a 2 1/2 ton amphibious truck. As you might imagine, it was nicknamed the "Duck."

The Battle of Saipan

The American offensive against Japan was a two-pronged attacked across the Pacific. The Army, under the command of Douglas MacArthur, advanced across the southwest Pacific to the Philippines. The Navy and Marine Corps, under Admiral Nimitz, attacked across the central Pacific. They "island-hopped," taking important Japanese held possessions in costly amphibious assaults and bypassing less important posts, allowing them to "die on the vine," cut-off from their supply chains.

The Marianas islands, of which Saipan was the most important, were needed as bases for the B-29 "Superfortress" bomber. It would be their job to pound the Japanese mainland into submission.

The assault on Saipan began on 15 June 1944, at about the same time as the Normandy invasion. An armada of 535 ships had carried 127,570 U. S. military personnel, two-thirds of whom were Marines of the 2nd and 4th Divisions, to the island. Seven American battleships and 11 destroyers shelled Saipan, and the lesser island of Tinian, for 2 days before the landings, firing 15,000 16-inch and 5-inch shells at the islands along with 165,000 other shells of other caliber. On the second day of the bombardment this force was joined by 8 more battleships, 6 heavy cruisers and 5 light cruisers.

Amphibious assaults are direct, head-on attacks with little latitude for suprise and the casualties are necessarily high. The Japanese defenders had prepared by positioning colored flags in the lagoon to mark the range of the landing force to help aim their howitzers. During the assault they rained shells on the approaching landing-craft. By nightfall of the first day, the Second Marine Division had sustained 2,000 casualties. By 9 July, when organized resistance ceased, American casualties were double that suffered at Guadalcanal. Of the 71,034 U. S. troops landed on Saipan, 3,100 were killed, 13,100 wounded or missing in action. Out of the 31,629 Japanese on Saipan, approximately 29,500 died as a result of the fighting, and only 2,100 prisoners survived.

The Dukw's initial function was to land artillery. After the landing phase, the amphibian trucks were used continually throughout the campaign, chiefly for hauling ammunition from shipboard or supply dumps to artillery emplacements and as prime movers for 105-mm. howitzers. Their great advantage was to be both a landing craft and a truck, able to proceed inland to wherever supplies were needed. In the opinion of General Holland Smith's G-4 officer, Colonel Anderson, GSC, "the DUKW was the outstanding single type of equipment employed in this operation."

Learning to drive the Dukw required great skill. They learned to time the incoming waves, and floored the throttle to ride them in as if they were on a surfboard, depositing the Dukw's well up on the beach. This technique became valuable in the heavy coral-reef surf off the beaches at Saipan.

One of the most startling events of the battle, to American eyes, was the mass suicide of hundreds of civilians, convinced that defeat was too great a shame to survive. Events such as this, and similar ones in Okinawa, helped convince the military that an assault on the Japanese home islands would be a blood-bath and ushered in the decision to use the atomic bomb.

Walter died on 29 February 1972. Reva died on 23 April 1986. They were both buried in the Culpeper National Cemetery, Culpeper, Culpeper County, Virginia. Their children were,
(26) Amy Clara Hissem

" (26) Amy Clara Hissem
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Joseph A. Hissam (1860) (25) Walter Scott Hissem (1907)

(24) Thomas J. Hissam Jr. (1863)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829)

He was born in 1863. Note that his father's regiment was back in West Virginia from duty in the Shenandoah Valley in May 1863. That's not quite enough time for propriety so I'll have to assume that Thomas Sr. got a furlough in March. In the 1870 census of the Harrisonville West post office, Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Thos J. Hisam, 7.

In the 1880 census . . . Is the next man the same as the above or is he a stray?

Thomas S. Hissem, of Tyler county, married Mary A. Cunningham, 20, of Harrisonville, West Virginia, on 10 June 1886 in Ritchie county, West Virginia. Thomas and Mary divorced in 1890. This divorce was noted on the marriage licence of Thomas and Nancy Trader, below.

Thomas married Nancy E. Trader, 27, on 14 March 1891 in Wirt county, West Virginia.

In the 1900 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Thomas S. Hissem, a 36 year old day laborer. Living with him were his wife, Nancy E. [?], 34 [July 1865], and son, Thomas V., 13 [May 1887]. His brother, Calvin, 16, was also living with him. An older brother, Joseph, lived in Grant township as well.

In the 1910 census of Grant township as Thomas Hissem, a 47 year old field man for the Gas company. Living with him were his wife, Nancy, 43, and son, Thomas V., a 22 year old laborer in the oil fields.

Thomas died on 6 June 1911 in Ritchie county, West Virginia, at the age of 47.

The child of Thomas and Mary was,
(25) Thomas Vinton Hissem (1887)

(25) Thomas Vinton Hissem (1887)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Thomas J. Hissam Jr. (1863)

Or Venton. Thomas V. Hissem was born on 16 May 1887. In the 1900 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Thomas V. Hissem, 13 [May 1887]. In the 1910 census of Grant township as Thomas V. Hissem, a 22 year old laborer in the oil fields, living at home with his parents.

Tomas Vinton Hissem registered for the draft on 5 June 1917 in Ritchie, West virginia. He was 30 years old at the time, a pumper for the South Pew Oil company. He requested a deferment because he was the sole support of his mother and his wife. He was described as tall with a medium build, with brown eyes and dark hair.

He moved to Ohio at some point, probably after 1922, and his Social Security card was issued there. There was a Thomas Hissem living in ohio in 1920, but he had a child already 13 years old, which would appear to rule him out as "our" Thomas. Thomas V. Hissem died on 20 February 1970 in Cleveland, Ohio.

(26) Thomas V. Hissem Jr. (1922)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) Thomas J. Hissam Jr. (1863) (25) Thomas V. Hissem (1887)

A Thomas V. Hissem was born on 29 March 1922 in West Virginia. He got his Social Security card in West Virginia, so he didn't leave the state too early.

Thomas V. Hissem Jr., who was born in 1922 in West Virginia, enlisted in the Army as a Private on 4 November 1942 in Clarksburg, West Virginia. He had a grammar school education and was classified as an automobile serviceman. He was single.

He died on 13 May 1985 in Warren township, Trumbull county, Ohio at the age of 63. He was noted, however as a resident of Lorain county. He was married at the time of his death. He is most likely a son of Thomas V. Sr.

(24) Phillip S. Hissam (1866)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829)

He was born in 1866. In the 1870 census of the Harrisonville West post office, Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Phillip S. Hisam, 4.

In the 1880 census . . .

(24) Emma J. Hissam (1868)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829)

She was born on 8 November 1868 in Ritchie county, West Virginia. In the 1870 census of the Harrisonville West post office, Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Emma J. Hisam, 2.

In the 1880 census . . .

(24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829)

He was born on 23 October 1875 in Ritchie county, West Virginia. In the 1880 census . . .

He married Mary Almeda Safronia Hewitt on 21 August 1897 in Ritchie county, West Virginia. She was the daughter of John William Hewitt and Salina Drusilla Cornell, born on 30 March 1878 in Goose Creek, Ritchie county, West Virginia.

In the 1900 census . . .

In the 1910 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Wesley J. Hissem, a 24 year old working for the B&O railroad. Living with him were his wife, Frona, 33, and children, Maybel, 11, Grace, 9, Mary, 7, Catherine, 5, Bertha, 3, and Charles, 1 2/12.

John Wesley Hissem of Donohue, Ritchie county, West Virginia registered for the draft on 12 September 1918, at the age of 43. He was a mason's helper, working for the B&O railroad company. His wife was Mary F. Hissem. He was of medium height with a slender build, and had gray eyes and brown hair.

In the 1920 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as John W. Hissem, a 44 year old stone mason working with the railroad. Living with him were his wife, Mary, 42, and children, Mary, 17, Catherine, 15, Bertha, 13, Charles, 10, Hazel, 6, Claude, 4, and John, 10/12.

Sometime in the 1920's John was involved with some improprieties involving theft of railroad supplies and equipment, but he was never charged. He does appear to have been discharged. Also at this time he and Frona filed for divorce, but was never finalized.

In the 1930 census of Union township, Marshall county, West Virginia as John W. Hissem, a 54 year old laborer at odd jobs, living with his son-in-law, Walter W. Quigley, and wife, Mary L.

In the 1930 census of Parkersburg City, Wood county, West Virginia as Frona Hissem. Living with her were her children Hazel and John W. Why were John and Frona living separately?

In the 1930 census of Parkersburg City, Wood county, West Virginia was John's youngest son, Carl, only 9 years old, living in another household [I can't currently get into the census to see].

I don't know where the rest of the children were at this time.

John, having just arrived for a visit with his daughter Katherine, died of a cerebral hemmorhage on 22 August 1944 in Detroit, Wayne county, Michigan. Frona died on 2 December 1971 in Parkersburg, Wood county, West Virginia. Their chidren were,
(25) Maybel Hissem (1899)
(25) Grace Hissem (1900)
(25) Mary L. Hissem (1902)
(25) Katherine Lagustine Hissem (1904)
(25) Bertha Hissem (1906)
(25) Charles Hissem (1909)
(25) Hazel Mildred Hissem (1913)
(25) Claude C. Hissem (1915)
(25) John Wesley Hissem (1919)
(25) Carl Dennis Hissem (1921)

(25) Maybel Hissem (1899)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)

Or Wilma Mabel. She was born on 15 March 1899 in Ritchie county, West Virginia. In the 1910 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Maybel Hissem, 11. She married Frank C. DeMoss. Was he any relation to the husband of Martin Luther Hissem's daughter, Mary? Mabel died on 24 August 1991 Her obituary:

"Ritchie Gazette" 29 August 1991 pg 6

Mabel DeMoss

Mabel DeMOSS, 92, of St. Marys, WV, died Saturday, Aug. 24, 1991, at Care Haven of Pleasants. She was born at Cairo, Ritchie County, WV, a daughter of the late John Wesley and Frona Hewitt Hissem. Surviving are two sons, Earl DeMoss and Frank DeMoss, both of St. Marys; three brothers, Claude Hissem and John Hissem, both of Ellenboro, WV, and Carl Hissem of Appomatox, VA; two sisters, Hazel Battiste of Tucson, Az, and Katherine Hissem of Michigan; eight grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren and six great-great-grandchildren. Preceding her in death were her husband, Frank C. DeMoss, Sr., a daughter, Alice Pethel, a brother, a sister and three grandchildren. Services were held at Ruttencutter Funeral Home, St. Marys, with the Rev. R. Dan Simmons officiating. Burial was in the Cairo Masonic Cemetery.

(25) Grace Hissem (1900)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)

She was born on 17 August 1900. In the 1910 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Grace Hissem, 9. She married Howard Moore in 1919.

(25) Mary L. Hissem (1902)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)

She was born on 19 May 1902 in Ritchie county, West Virginia. In the 1910 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Mary Hissem, 7.

In the 1920 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Mary, 17, living with her parents, John W. Hissem, 44, and Mary, 42.

She married Walter William Quigley on 13 August 1920 in Rithie county. Her father, John W. Hissem, was living with her in 1930. She died on 26 July 1953 in Wheeling, Ohio county, West Virginia.

(25) Katherine Lagustine Hissem (1904)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)

Or Catherine. She was born on 27 July 1904 in Petroleum, Ritchie county, West Virginia. In the 1910 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Catherine Hissem, 5.

In the 1920 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Catherine, 15, living with her parents, John W. Hissem, 44, and Mary, 42.

Katherine married Eugene Warren Moore on 25 April 1925 in Wheeling, Ohio county, West Virginia. He was the son of Jonathan "Lake" Moore Jr. and Katherine Elizabeth Walls. They were divorced soon after their only child, Jean, was born in 1927, in Cairo, West Virginia.

In the 1930 census of South Branch township, Crawford county, Michigan as Katherine L. Moore, a housekeeper in the home of Mansel Cone. Living with her was her daughter, Jean K. Moore.

She next married Raymond L. Millington, who adopted Katherine's daughter. Katherine and Raymond lived in Inkster, Michigan.

Katherine moved into a nursing home in Detroit, Michigan several years after her second husband's death. She died 3 January 1995 in Berkley, Oakland county, Michigan.

(25) Bertha Hissem (1906)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)

She was born on 26 September 1906. In the 1910 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Bertha Hisssem, 3.

In the 1920 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Bertha, 13, living with her parents, John W. Hissem, 44, and Mary, 42. She married a Benjamin.

She died in May 1986 in Davisville, Wood county, West Virginia.

(25) Charles Hissem (1909)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)

Charles E. Hissem was born on 8 March 1909.

In the 1910 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Charles Hissem, 1 2/12.

In the 1920 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Charles, 10, living with his parents, John W. Hissem, 44, and Mary, 42.

In the 1930 census . . .

Charles E. Hissem, who was born in 1909 in West Virginia, enlisted in the Army Air Corps as a Private on 9 November 1945 in California at March Field Riverside. He enlisted for the Hawaiian Department. He had a grammar school education and was classified as a miner [coal?]. He was single. He had apparently been in the National Guard before joining.

According to another family researcher:

"John was best man at Charles' wedding. Charles was a real nut who was always playing practical jokes.

John seems to think Charles was killed in Germany...he was small in stature but had a "big mouth." John said they refused to open the casket for the funeral. Obit said he had died at a "friend's" home.

Charles had been originally in the cavalry, but when it became armor, he transferred. He spent a large amount of his time in the Army in Panama."

He married Estelleen Plum.

Charles E. Hissem died on 11 August 1949 in Germany. I believe he was a Staff Sergeant in the 85th Air Base Group [or Depot Wing] at the time. This was at Erding Air Force Base in southeastern Germany. Their mission was to provide depot-level maintenance to Air Force and NATO fighters.

He was buried in Nine Mile cemetery, Pleasants county, West Virginia.

(25) Hazel Mildred Hissem (1913)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)

She ws born on 19 June 1913. In the 1920 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Hazel, 6, living with her parents, John W. Hissem, 44, and Mary, 42.

Hazel married (1) Benny Danforth in about September 1932 in Guysville, Ohio; (2) Howard MacClellan Frazee in September 1940 in Bowling Green, Ohio; (3) Benjamin Baily Battiste on 27 July 1962 in Phoenix, Maricopa county, Arizona. She was living in Tucson, Arizona in 1991 at the time of her sister, Mabel's, death.

Per Rick Hissem:

Hazel provided me with much of the family info. She has had an interesting life at times. She was married to a gangster (Benny Danforth), later owned/operated "The Hillcrest Inn" in Wolverine, MI. Her lodge allowed her to make many aquaintances, including several governors, and TV personalities. She had kept a guest book there, and someone stole it.

Hazel only finished 6th grade. After they moved to Parkersburg, she settled in a school she liked, and then they "redistricted". She didn't like the new school so she quit, and helped raise John and Carl. She began working as a waitress, then cook, and left home to be on her own at 14.

She provided me with a lot of info on growing up in Silver Run. They lived very close to the No. 20 tunnel, and there was an army camp at the top of the hill during WWI. Her mother did laundry for the soldiers, and wound up having lice infestation from their clothing. They lived in the old McTag house-built by the original Scottish settlers in that part of the country (ca. 1820s). Most of the younger children were born in the house, and it burned down shortly after the family moved to Parkersburg."
She died on 8 October 2010 in Tucson, Pima county, Arizona. Her obituary:
"Hazel M. Frazee Battiste of Tucson, passed away October 8, 2010 at the age of 97. She is survived by numerous nieces and nephews, as well as many friends. Hazel was born in West Virginia on June 19, 1913 to John and Frona Hissem. While still a very young 14 year old, she left home and began her work life as a waitress and later became a bartender. After many years of learning the hospitality business, she purchased and operated the Hillcrest Inn Hotel in Wolverine, Michigan. She was assisted by her husband, Mac who preceded her in death in 1961. Hazel was a member of the First Brethren Church, Tucson, Arizona. She was a life member of the Old Pueblo Lapidary Club of Tucson and a charter member of the Sonora Desert Museum. She was also a Life Member and Past Worthy Matron of the Order of Eastern Star, Primrose Chapter 183, Indian River, Michigan. Hazel was a plain spoken but a colorful woman remembered by most everyone she met. She knew what she wanted, went after it, and got it. As a testament to her strong and independent nature, she remained in her home until earlier this year when her health began to fail her."
She had no children.

(25) Claude Calvin Hissem (1915)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)

He was born on 11 May 1915 on Silver Run, near Cairo, West Virginia. In the 1920 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Claude, 4, living with his parents, John W. Hissem, 44, and Mary [Frona Hewitt Hissem], 42.

In the 1930 census . . .

Claude married Olive Eleanor Hall in January 1938.

He served in the Navy for 6 years and then was a civilian contract employee of the U. S. Air Force for 25 years. "Claude always is trying to help those down on their luck. Donated home to church. Worked as test engineer at Wright Field, was exempt from wartime service due to importance of work. Worked on jet propulsion, including SR-71 engines. Retired at 25 years Civil Service." - per Rick Hissem.

1983: A "Mr. and Mrs. Claude Hissem have returned from a visit with their son, Bud Hissem and family of El Monte, California." - from the Pennsboro News of Pennsboro, West Virginia, dated 15 September 1983. Note that (25) Frank Edgar Hissem (1892) worked at a company located in El Monte. The relationship here is not close however.

Claude was living in Ellenboro, West Virginia in 1991 at the time of his sister, Mabel's, death. Claude's obituary:

"Claude C. Hissem
May 11, 1915 - January 25, 2009

Claude C. Hissem, 93, of Ellenboro, WV, departed this life on Sunday, Jan. 25, 2009, at Marietta, OH.

Mr. Hissem was born on May 11, 1915, on Silver Run near Cairo, WV, a son of the late John Wesley and Mary Frona Hewitt Hissem. He was a 6 year veteran of the U. S. Navy and had held employment as civilian contract employee of the U. S. Air Force for 25 years. He was a member of the First Apostolic Church of Harrisville, WV.

He is survived by a daughter, Jean Hufford, Ellenboro, WV; son, Harry “Bud” Hissem, Paris, IL; foster children, Sarah B. Weekley, Parkersburg, WV, Anna L. Gregg, Pike, WV, and Lawrence McDonald, New Philadelphia, OH; sister, Hazel Battiste, Tucson, AZ; eleven grandchildren; and several great grandchildren.

In addition to his parents, Mr. Hissem was preceded in death by his wife, Olive Eleanor Hall Hissem; brothers, Carl, Charles, and John Hissem; and sisters, Mabel DeMoss, Mary Quigley, Grace Moore, Katherine “Kitty” Millington, and Bertha Benjamin.

Funeral Services will be 11 AM, Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2009, from the First Apostolic Church, Harrisville, WV, with the Rev. Alan Adams and Rev. Kenneth Perine officiating. Friends may call from 5 to 8 PM on Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2009, at the Raiguel Funeral Home, Harrisville, WV, and from 10 to 11 AM on Wednesday at the church."
Claude had been residing in Parkersburg, West Virginia at the time of his death.

(26) Harry "Bud" Hissem (c1946)

Of El Monte, California and later of Paris, Illinois.

(26) Jean Hufford Hissem (c1946)

Of Ellenboro, West Virginia.

(25) John Wesley Hissem Jr. (1919)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)

John was born on 3 March 1919 in Cairo, West Virginia. In the 1920 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as John, 10/12, living with his parents, John W. Hissem, 44, and Mary, 42.

In the 1930 census of . . .

The Pearl Harbor Muster Reports list John W. Hissem as assigned to the USS PENNSYLVANIA BB-38 from as early as 30 September 1940. He would have been about 21 years old, which means he had probably been in the service for several years previous. He served with his brother, Carl D., below.

USS PENNSYLVANIA

Sister ship of the USS ARIZONA, she was launched on 16 March 1915 and commissioned on 12 June 1916.

In 1931 the PENNSYLVANIA joined the Pacific Fleet, being based at San Pedro, California. She spent her time at-sea engaged in battle practice and Fleet manuevers off California and in the Hawaiian waters. She received an overhaul in the Puget Sound, Washington, Naval Shipyard at the end of 1940 and, on 7 January 1941, sailed for Pearl Harbor. This was part of President Roosevelt's plan to intimidate the Japanese by forward basing the fleet in Hawaii.

At the time of the Japanese attack on 7 December 1941, the PENNSYLVANIA was in drydock at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard. While damaged in the attack, the battleship was able to sail to San Francisco for repairs, arriving there on 29 December. On 30 March 1942, the repairs completed, she headed back into the Pacific, conducting extensive training operations along the coast of California and off Hawaii.

It was not until 1943 that USS PENNSYLVANIA engaged in hostile operations, taking part in the battle to retake the Aleutian Islands of Attu and Kiska. Later that year she took part in the assault of Makin Atoll in the Gilbert Islands. She was thereafter engaged across the Pacific.

"In January 1945, Pennsylvania took part in the Lingayen Gulf invasion. She returned to San Francisco in March for another overhaul. Freshly returned to the combat zone in August, she was seriously damaged by a Japanese aerial torpedo off Okinawa on 12 August 1945, the last major Navy ship to be hit during the Second World War."

The battleship ended her days as a target. "The USS PENNSYLVANIA was used in "Operation Crossroads" as a target ship for Atomic Bomb testing. Following the first Atomic explosion at Bikini Island on July 1, 1946 and then a second explosion on July 25, 1946, the USS Pennsylvania did not sink. Almost two years later, February 10, 1948, the USS Pennsylvania was towed to the Island of Kwajalein in the South Pacific and a small crew went aboard and opened the "Sea Valves" and removed the Evaporator cover plates and sent the "Grand Old Gal" to the bottom of the sea." - Ken Munro

I have a "J. Hissem" who was in the 4th Division onboard the USS PENNSYLVANIA (BB-38), a Pacific Fleet ship, in 1945. He's in the first row, number 8 from the left, of the photograph below - he doesn't look happy. Carl wasn't in this photo, I imagine, because he had transferred to another ship, the destroyer PURVIS.


Fourth Division

John left the service holding the rank of Chief Petty Officer, the highest enlisted rank at that time.

John married Winola Ruth "Winnie" Stickel. John then married Frances Katherine Buskirk on 30 April 1947; he was 28, she 26. She was born on 15 April 1921 in Wood county, West Virginia, the daughter of William and Hattie Buskirk.

Frances died in February 1984. John was living in Ellenboro, West Virginia in 1991 at the time of his sister, Mabel's, death. He died on 14 August 2008 in Marietta, Washington county, Ohio. John's obituary:

"John Wesley Hissem, 89, of Ellenboro, W.Va., departed this life on Thursday, Aug. 14, 2008, at Marietta.

Mr. Hissem was born on March 3, 1919, at Silver Run near Cairo, W.Va., a son of the late John W. Sr. and Mary Frona Hewitt Hissem. He was retired from the U.S. Navy as a Chief Petty Officer and was the last surviving Ritchie County native of the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor which initiated war with Japan. He was a member of the Pennsboro Apostolic Church.

He is survived by daughters, Cindy (Forrest) Rice of Reidsville, N.C., and Vickie Hissem of Parkersburg; stepchildren, Rodney (Donna) Perine with whom John made his home, of Ellenboro and John "Scotty" Perine of Vienna; brother, Claude C. Hissem of Ellenboro; sister, Hazel M. Battiste of Tucson, Ariz.; grandchild, Crystal Rice; stepgrandchildren, Missy Williams, Shawn and Brett Jones, David, Matthew and Vanessa Perine; and seven stepgreat-grandchildren.

In addition to his parents, Mr. Hissem was preceded in death by brothers, Charles and Carl Hissem; and sisters, Mabel DeMoss, Mary Quigley, Grace Moore, Katherine Millington and Bertha Benjamin."
John's children were,
(26) Cindy Hissem Forest
(26) Vickie Hissem

(25) Carl Dennis Hissem (1921)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829) (24) John Wesley Hissam (1875)

Carl was born on 24 May 1921 - from the Social Security Death Index. He was issued his SS card in California, so I expect that was as part of joining the Navy.

In the 1930 census of Parkersburg City, Wood county, West Virginia as Carl Hissem, age 10, living with . . . ?

The Pearl Harbor Muster Reports lists Carl Dennis Hissem as assigned to the USS PENNSYLVANIA BB-38 from as early as 30 September 1940. "Carl D Hissem. United States Navy USS Pennsylvania Seaman 2nd Class." - from Pearl Harbor Survivors Project website. He served with his brother, John W., above.

While his brother, John, stayed aboard PENNSYLVANIA when she returned to California for repairs, Carl stayed in Hawaii. In muster reports of May/June 1942 he was assigned to the Naval Shipyard and the 14th Naval District. I don't know in which ships he served between 1942 and 1945.

Carl married Bernice Marie Cantwell on 04 October 1943 in Parkersburg, Wood county, West Virginia.

Carl Hissem of Appomatox, Virginia was listed as a member of the crew of the USS HUGH PURVIS, DD 709 on a ship reunion webste. PURVIS was a SUMNER-Class destroyer launched in March 1945, at the tail-end of the war.

USS HUGH PURVIS

The PURVIS, named for a Medal of Honor winner of the 19th century, was launched in Kearny, New Jersey in December 1944, and commissioned in March 1945. Following shake-down training in the Caribbean, she transitted the Panama Canal to take part in training exercises in Hawaiian waters. She did not see combat in World War II, returned to Casco Bay, Maine in April 1946.

Carl married Jeannette Elise Mowen on 18 May 1946 in Annapolis, Maryland. She died on 8 October 1985 in Lynchburg, Virginia.

He married Doris Glora Decker in February 1987 in Appomatox, Virginia. Carl Hissem was living in Appomatox, Virginia in 1991 at the time of his sister, Mabel's, death.

Carl died on 22 April 1992 in Appomatox, Virginia.

(24) Calvin W. Hissam (1883)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Thomas J. Hissam (1829)

He was born on 9 July 1883. In the 1900 census of Grant township, Ritchie county, West Virginia as Calvin W. [H in Ancestry.com] Hissem, a 16 year old [July 1883] student. He was living with his brother, Thomas S. [sic] Hissem [December 1863]. Note that his father had died in 1885.

From the records of the State of West Virginia, Ritchie Co. Court Clerk's Office May 22, 1902:

"On motion of Calvin W. Hissem in writing, D.M. Sharpnack is appointed guardian of Calvin W. Hissem, age 17 years [should be 18], minor and heir at law of Willowmina Hissam [his mother], deceased".
Sharpnack paid $100 bond. D.M. Sharpnack, resident of Petroleum, became legal guardian of Calvin W. Hissam in September 1903. Interestingly, Calvin's older brother, Thomas, with whom he had been living in 1900 was still in Grant township in 1910. Why didn't he continue to act as guardian? Calvin could read and write so I assume he wasn't "simple."

Daniel M. Sharpnack was a prominent citizen of Petroleum. He came to the village in 1869 and had been post-master, telegraph operator, real estate agent, & express agent, and was a mechanic of more than ordinary skill. In the 1900 and 1910 census of Petroleum, Grant township there was a Daniel M. Sharpnack, 54/64, resepectively, an agent for the B&O railraod, and his wife, Ella M., but there was no sign of Calvin in either document. Daniel had three children of his own, but they had left his house by 1900. I suspect Calvin lived with Daniel for only a few years.

Calvin died on 14 July 1914 in Everson, Marion county, West Virginia, at the age of 31. He did not marry.

(23) Joab Hissem (1829)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

A farmer, he was born about 1829 in Tyler county, West Virginia. He married Deborah Ellen Slocum on 24 February 1859 in Ritchie county, West Virginia. She had been born about 1828 in Harrison county, Virginia. She had first married Thomas J. Nutter circa 1848 and had several children with him. Nutter was born in 1822 and died in December 1852. Thomas Nutter was shot and killed by a deputy Sheriff by the name of Lowther. It is said he was shot in the back after he had been bound or handcuffed. They all agree to the fact he was shot and killed by the deputy. No reason given.

In the 1860 census of Ritchie county, West Virginia he was listed as Joab Hissam, a 26 year old farmer. He had personal property worth $188. Living with him were his wife, Debie [Debre?] E., 30, and step-children, Columbia A. Nutter, 10, Clarinda M. Nutter, 8, and Debie E. Nutter, 7.

Joab died on 21 May 1869 in Ritchie county at the age of 40. In the 1870 census of Grant township, Ritchie county was D. [Debra] E. and Andrew C. Hissam, aged 8. Debra's daughters Clarinda and Debra were also living with her. D.E., 51, and Andrew Hissem, 18, are also in the 1880 census for Ritchie county. Andrew was listed as a stepson of H. Pratt, Debra's third husband.

Deborah died in 1905.

(24) Andrew "Bud" Hissem (1862)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Joab Hissem (1829)

Bud was born in 1862. In the 1870 census of Grant township, Ritchie county as Andrew C. Hissam, aged 8. Andrew Hissem, 18, was also in the 1880 census for Grant township, Ritchie county, living at home with his mother, D.E., and his step-father, H. Pratt. Andrew never married.

(23) Levi Hissam (1833)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

He was born in June 1833 in Tyler county, West Virginia. In the 1850 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Levi Hissam, 17, living at home with his parents, Thomas and Rachel.

He married Ruthaminda Way, of Ohio. I have a Ruth Way who was living in Perry township, Monroe county, Ohio at the time of the 1850 census. This was just across the Ohio river from Tyler county, West Virginia. She was born in about 1838, in Ohio, the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Way, of Virginia.

In the 1860 census of Sisterville, Tyler county, West Virginia, as Levi Hisam, a 27 year old farmer. He was a neighbor of his mother, Rachel, and of Abner Hissam [1812/1818], his elder half-brother. He appears to have had no real property and personal property of only about $143. Ruthaminda was 21 at the time and his son, Thomas D. Hisam, was one year old.

In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Ellsworth township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Levi Hisam, a 37 year old farmer, born in Virginia, with real property worth $1000 and personal property worth $150. Living with him are his wife, Minda, 31, Thomas, 12, Jane, 9, Sarah 6, and Ozias, 1.

Ruthaminda probably died soon after 1870 since there were no more children registered for the couple. In the 1880 census of Union district, Tyler county as Levi Hisam, a farmer aged 46, a widower. Listed with him were his children, Sarah E., 16, and Ozias W., 10. His parents are shown as born in West Virginia. His son Thomas was on the next farm, working for a neighbor as a field hand.

At some point Levi moved to Ohio, perhaps in company with his sons, Thomas and Ozias, who apparently went there in the late 1880's. In the 1900 census of Wayne township, Jefferson county, Ohio as Levi Hissam, a 68 year old [June 1833]. He was living with his son, Osias, 31, and his family.

By 1910 Levi Hisam was living in the household of his son, O. W. Hisam, in Jefferson county, Ohio. He was 78 years old. He probably died soon after, but I have not found his tombstone.

His children were,
(24) Thomas D. Hissam (1858)
(24) Jane Hissam (1861)
(24) Sarah E. Hissam (1864)
(24) Ozias W. Hissam (1869)

(24) Thomas D. Hissam (1858)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Levi Hissam (1833)

He was born in July 1858. In the 1860 census of Sisterville, Tyler county, West Virginia, as Thomas D. Hisam, 1. In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Ellsworth township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Thomas Hisam, 12. In the 1880 census of Tyler county as Thomas Hisam, a 21 year old farm hand working on the farm of David M. Dancer. This farm was 'next door' to the farm of Levi Hisam, his father.

At some point he moved to Ohio, perhaps in company with his father, Levi, and brother, Ozias, who were in Wayne township. He apparently married a Gibson who died between 1888 and 1900. In the 1900 census of Steubenville precinct, Jefferson county, Ohio as Thomas Hissam, a 41 year old day laborer. He was a widower. Living with him were his daughter, Nellie, 12 [January 1888], and nephew, Darwin Gibson, 7.

In the 1910 census of Steubenville precinct, Jefferson county, Ohio as Thomas Hisam, a 52 year old millwright in a paper mill. Living with him was his second wife, Aggie, 46, of Maine. It was also her second marriage. She had a surviving child from her first marriage, but they were not living with Thomas at that time. Thomas and Aggie had been married for 9 years. Also living with him was his daughter, Mellie [sic], 22. She had been married for 6 years, but was now divorced. She had no children. Oddly there were also two young boarders, Richard Little, 7, and Frances Rochelle, 2, both of Ohio. They were clearly not directly related to anyone else in the house.

In the 1920 census of Wayne township, Jefferson county Ohio as Thomas Hisam, a 61 year old teamster working at a sawmill. His brother, Ozias, below, was also living in Wayne township. Living with him was his wife, Aggie, 57. He disappears after this.

His children were,
(25) Nellie Hissam (1888)

(25) Nellie Hissam (1888)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Levi Hissam (1833) (24) Thomas D. Hissam (1858)

She was born in January 1888. In the 1900 census of Steubenville precinct, Jefferson county, Ohio as Nellie Hissam, 12 [January 1888]. In the 1910 census of Steubenville precinct, Jefferson county, Ohio as Mellie [sic] Hisam, 22. She had been married for 6 years, but was now divorced. She had no children.

(24) Jane Hissam (1861)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Levi Hissam (1833)

She was born in 1861. In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Ellsworth township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Jane Hisam, 9.

(24) Sarah E. Hissam (1864)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Levi Hissam (1833)

She was born in 1864. In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Ellsworth township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Sarah 6 Hisam. In the 1880 census of Union district, Tyler county as Levi Sarah E. Hisam, 16. Sarah E. Hissem [sic] married George Williamson on 4 March 1861 in Tyler county, West Virginia. I don't know if this is our Sarah, but note that her younger brother, Ozias, married a Margaret Williamson.

(24) Ozias W. Hissam (1869)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Levi Hissam (1833)

He was born in September 1869. In the 1870 census of the Middlebourne post office, Ellsworth township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Ozias Hisam, 1. In the 1880 census of Union district, Tyler county as Ozias W. Hisam, 10.

Ozias

The name means "Yahweh [God] is my strength." Is is the name of six Israelites mentioned in the Bible, including the father of Saul.

Ozias Hissem [sic] married Margaret E. Williamson, of Ohio, on 23 May 1889 in Tyler county, West Virginia. Ozias was 20 and Maggie just 15 [!]. At some point Ozias moved to Ohio, perhaps in company with his father, Levi, and brother, Thomas, who went there in the late 1880's.

In the 1900 census of Wayne township, Jefferson county, Ohio as Osias [sic] Hissam, a 31 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Maggie E., 26 [May 1874], and daughter, Susanna B., 1 [March 1899]. Also living with him was his father, Levi, 67, and his mother-in-law, Susanna Williamson, 65.

In the 1910 census of Jefferson county as O. W. Hisam, a 41 year old farmer. Living with him was his wife, Maggie, 36, his daughter, Susanna, 11, his father, Levi, 78, and his mother-in-law, Susanna Williamson, 75.

In the 1920 census of Wayne township, Jefferson county, Ohio as Ozias Hisam, a 50 year old teamster with his own team. Living with him was his wife, Margaret, 45, and daughter, Susanna, 20.

In the 1930 census of Wayne township as Ozias Hissam, a 61 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Maggie E., 55, and daughter Susanna E., 21.

I believe Ozias had eight children, all of whom, except Susanna, died young,
(25) Birtie Hissam (c1867) of West Virginia
(25) Katie Hissam (c1889) of West Virginia
(25) Henry Hissam (c1892) of West Virginia
(25) Calvin Hissam (c1898) of Ohio
(25) Susanna E. Hissam (1899) of Ohio
(25) Albert Hissam (c1900) of West Virginia
(25) Alston Hissam (c1904) of Ohio
(25) Winsola Hissam (c1906) of West Virginia

(25) Susanna E. Hissam (1899)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Levi Hissam (1833) (24) Ozias W. Hissam (1869)

She was born on 31 March 1899. In the 1900 census of Wayne township, Jefferson county, Ohio as Susanna E. Hissam, 1 [March 1899]. In the 1910 census of Jefferson county as Susanna Hisam, 11. In the 1920 census of Wayne township, Jefferson county, Ohio as Susanna Hisam, 20. In the 1930 census of Wayne township as Susanna B. Hissam, 21. She died on 15 June 1973. Her last residence was Richmond, Jefferson county, Ohio. Apparently she never married.

(23) Isabella Hissam (1835)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

She was born in 1835 in West Virginia. In the 1850 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Isabella Hissam, 15. In the census of 1860 for Tyler county as Isabel Hissam, 26, living at home with her widowed mother. She married Isaac Weekly [a lot of Weekly's married into this branch of the family] in 11 June 1865 in Tyler county.

(23) Eveline Hissam (1837)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

She was born in 1837 in West Virginia. In the 1850 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Eveline Hissam, 13. In the census of 1860 for Tyler county as Eveline Hissam, 24, living at home with her widowed mother. In the 1870 census of Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Eveline Hissam, 28. That's six years too young.

(23) Samuel Hissam (1838)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

He was born on 5 May 1838 in Tyler county. In the 1850 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Samuel Hissam, 11. In the census of 1860 for Tyler county as Samuel Hissam, 22.

Samuel Hissom [sic] married Hannah Haught on 25 August 1867 in Tyler county.

Civil War Service Records indicate that Samuel Hisam enlisted on 1 August 1862 as a Private in Company "E" of the 10th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry of the Union Army. Also noted in the same Service Records to be known as Samuel Hissam. He served from 1861 to 1865. An early record shows that “Pvt. Samuel Hissam, Tyler County, 23. Mustered at Camp Hartsuff Oct. 4, 1862. Detailed to division hospital.” Note this was 5 months after his cousins, Thomas J. and Jesse Hissam, had enlisted in the same unit. See 10th West Virginia for the story of the Regiment.

Per Thomas J. Hisam - pension records: Samule was “Taken with partial blindness so that he could not march after night and had to be led by a comrade. PO address = Wick, Tyler Co. & Friendly, Tyler Co. Following discharge - resided near Littles Mills, Tyler Co."

Samule's disability began in August 1864 in the Shenandoah Valley – “it commenced with [garbled] deafness and blindness. Caused by hea [garbled]. Gets all in-laws to vouch for his disability. As of May 1889 - received a pension of $4/mo.” See his cousin’s similar pension application, above. He was discharged on 1 July 1865.

The 1870 census of Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia has a Samuel Hissem, 26, living with his mother, Rachel Hissem, 72. However, his age was too young by about 6 years. Living with them were Jesse, 32, a grandson of Rachel born in Ohio, and Samuel's sister, Eveline, 28, as well as Samuel's family, his wife, Hannah, 23, and son, Okey, 2.

In the 1880 census of Union district, Tyler county, West Virginia as Samuel Hisam, a 42 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Hanah, 32, and children, Okey J. [Jesse?], 12, who was helping on the farm, Sarah J., 9, Rachel E., 7, John L., 4, and Nora M., 2/12. Nora was born in April 1880. Samuel was born in West Virginia, but both of his parents were born in Pennsylavnia.

Samuel Hisam filed for a pension as an invalid of the Civil War on 19 January 1880. His widow received the pension after his death.

In the 1900 census of Union district as Samuel Hisam, a 62 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Hannah W., 57 [October 1848], and children, Rachel E., 27 [August 1872], John L., a 24 year old teacher [April 1876], and Nora M., 20 [April 1880].

The Oak Grove cemetary, of Tyler county, West Virginia has the following tombstones, some of whom seem to fit here:

Hisam
Hisam
Hisam, Samuel, born May 5, 1838, died Aug 8, 1905, notes 67y 3m 3d
Hisam, Hannah, born Oct 4, 1848, died June 9, 1928
Hisam, Rachel E., born Aug 3, 1872, died Feb 22, 1945
Hisam, John L., born 1876, died 1931
Hisam, Oscar S., born Jan 29, 1894, died Apr 25, 1894, notes s/o O.J. & S.
Hisam, Vina, born Aug 25, 1892, Nov 12, 1892, notes d/o O.J. & S.
Samuel died on 8 August 1905 in Friendly, West Virginia at the age of 67. Hannah died many years later, on 9 June 1928. His children were,
(24) Okey J. Hissam (1868)
(24) Sarah Joann (Jane) Hissam (1870)
(24) Rachel E. Hissam (1872)
(24) John Ledley Hissam (1876)
(24) Nora M. Hissam (1880)

(24) Okey J. Hissam (1868)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838)

He was born on 1 June 1868. His middle name may be Jesse. Also called Clay. In the 1870 census of Union township, Tyler county, West Virginia as Okey Hissem, 2. In the 1880 census of Union district, Tyler county, West Virginia as Okey J. Hisam, 12. He was helping on the farm.

Okey Hissem [sic] married Susanna Hoskins on 23 February 1890 in Tyler county, West Virginia. It has been claimed that her mother was a full blooded Cherokee.

In the Oak Grove cemetary, Tyler county are the graves of two of his children that died young,
Hisam, Vina, born Aug 25, 1892, died Nov 12, 1892, notes d/o O.J. & S.
Hisam, Oscar S., born Jan 29, 1894, died Apr 25, 1894, notes s/o O.J. & S.

In the 1900 census of Union township as Okey J. Hisam [Key J. Hisam in Ancestry.com], a 31 year old farmer. He was living next-door to his father, Samuel. Living with him were his wife, Susannah, 30 [April 1870], and children, Cora N., 9 [April 1891], Jennie, 7 [August 1892], and Bessie E., 2 [January 1898].

In the 1910 census of Union township as Oakey J. Hisam, a 41 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Susana J., 39, and children, Cora N., 19, oddly shown as being a farm laborer, Jennie, 18, Bessie E., 12, and Goldie A., 8. The 1900 census had shown Susanna as born in West Virginia; the 1910 shows her and per parents as born in Ohio.

Both Okey and his wife, Susanna, apparently died between 1910 and 1920. In the 1920 census of Union township we have their daughter, Goldie A. Hissam, 17, as a step-daughter of Luther M. Hoskins and his wife, Susanna, 49. Remember that Okey's wife had been a Hoskins. I assume the other daughters had married by this time.

His children were,
(25) Cora N. Hissam (1891)
(25) Jennie Hissam (1892)
(25) Vina Hissam (1892)
(25) Oscar S. Hissam (1894)
(25) Bessie E. Hissam (1898)
(25) Goldie A. Hissam (1903)

(25) Cora N. Hissam (1891)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838) (24) Okey J. Hissam (1868)

In the 1900 census of Union township as Cora N. Hisam, 9 [April 1891]. In the 1910 census of Union township as Cora N. Hisam, 19, oddly shown as being a farm laborer.

(25) Jennie Hissam (1892)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838) (24) Okey J. Hissam (1868)

In the 1900 census of Union township as Jennie Hisam, 7 [August 1892]. In the 1910 census of Union township as Jennie Hisam.

(25) Vina Hissam (1892)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838) (24) Okey J. Hissam (1868)

The twin of Jennie, above. In the Oak Grove cemetary, Tyler county is her grave, "Hisam, Vina, born Aug 25, 1892, died Nov 12, 1892, notes d/o O.J. & S."

(25) Oscar S. Hissam (1894)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838) (24) Okey J. Hissam (1868)

In the Oak Grove cemetary, Tyler county is his grave, "Hisam, Oscar S., born Jan 29, 1894, died Apr 25, 1894, notes s/o O.J. & S."

(25) Bessie E. Hissam (1898)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838) (24) Okey J. Hissam (1868)

In the 1900 census of Union township as Bessie E. Hisam, 2 [January 1898]. In the 1910 census of Union township as Bessie E. Hisam, 12 .

(25) Goldie A. Hissam (1903)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838) (24) Okey J. Hissam (1868)

In the 1910 census of Union township as Goldie A. Hisam, 8. In the 1920 census of Union township as Goldie A. Hissam, 17, a step-daughter of Luther M. Hoskins and his wife, Susanna, 49. Remember that Okey's wife had been a Hoskins. I assume the other daughters had married by this time.

(24) Sarah Joann (Jane) Hissam (1870)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838)

She was born on 10 November 1870. In the 1880 census of Union district, Tyler county, West Virginia as Sarah J. Hisam, 9. She married a Buckhannon.

(24) Rachel E. Hissam (1872)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838)

She was born on 3 August 1872. In the 1880 census of Union district, Tyler county, West Virginia as Rachel E. Hisam, 7. In the 1900 census of Union district as Rachel E. Hisam, 27 [August 1872]. She died on 22 February 1945 and was buried in the Oak Grove cemetary. Apparently she never married.

(24) John Ledley Hissam (1876)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838)

He was born on 6 April 1876. There is another John "Led" Hissam, the son of William Hissam of the David Heysham branch of the family. In the 1880 census of Union district, Tyler county, West Virginia as John L. Hisam, 4. In the 1900 census of Union district as John L. Hisam, a 24 year old teacher [April 1876].

A John L. Hissom [sic] married Lootie J. Craig on 16 April 1892 in Tyler county. She apparently died because John Ladley [sic] Hisam married Illa Dee Patterson on 1 January 1908. He was 29 and she 17. Illa was the daughter of Amos Milton Patterson and Nancy Cerena Wilson. Illa's first husband was Steve Buchanan. She had sisters, Ina, Isa and Ida.

In the 1910 census of Union township as John L. Hisam, a 32 year old Public School teacher. Living with him were his wife, I. Dee, 22, and his son, T. Gale, 2. I don't see John in the 1920 census.

John L. Hisam, of Bens Run, registered for the draft on 12 September 1918 in Tyler county, West Virginia, at the age of 42. He was a teacher in Bens Runs, employed by the Board of Education of Tyler county. His wife was Ila D. Hisam, of Bens Run. He was described as Tall and slender, with blue eyes and light hair.

In the 1920 census of Butler township, Hancock county, West Virginia as John L. Hisam, a 43 year old school teacher. Living with him was his wife, Ila D., 32, and son, Lawrence G., 12.

In the 1930 census of Union township as John L. Hissam, a 53 year old teacher. Living with him were his wife, Ila D., 40, and son, Gale L., 23 with no occupation.

The Oak Grove cemetary, of Tyler county, West Virginia has the following tombstones, "Hisam, John L., born 1876, died 1931," and Ila Hisam Buchanan, born 1887, died 1963." She apparently remarried. His children were,
(25) Gayle Lawrence Hisam (1907)

(25) Gayle Lawrence Hisam (1907)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838) (24) John Ledley Hissam (1876)

In the 1910 census of Union township as T. Gale Hisam, 2. In the 1920 census of Butler township, Hancock county, West Virginia as Lawrence G. Hisam, 12, the son of John L. Hisam.

In the 1930 census of Union township as Gale L. Hissam, 23 with no occupation.

In 1979 Gayle L. Hisam was living in Friendly, West Virginia.

In the Friendly, West Virginia cemetary is the tombstone of, "Gayle Hisam, 1907-1983, US Navy WWII." He may have had a son, or sons. In the same cemetary is Larry Joe Hisam, 1951-1989. I also have a Gayle Hisam living in Friendly, West Virginia from 1994 to 2002.

(24) Nora M. Hissam (1880)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778) (23) Samuel Hissam (1838)

She was born on 21 April 1880. In the 1880 census of Union district, Tyler county, West Virginia as Nora M. Hisam, 2/12. In the 1900 census of Union district as Nora M. Hisam, 20 [April 1880].

(23) Frances Hissam (1846)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Thomas Hissam (1778)

She was was born in 1846 in West Virginia. In the 1860 census of Tyler county, shown as Frances V. Huffman. I expect she was actually a granddaughter of one of Thomas' daughters.

(22) Catherine Hisem (1796)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750)

She was born on 14 June 1796 - from the International Genealogical Index. The IGI claims she was born in Virginia, but both Thomas and David were still in Pennsylvania at that time. Which was her father?
- Thomas Hissom, per the 1810 census, had a daughter born sometime between 1794 and 1800.
- David Hissom/Heysham, per the 1800 census, had a daughter born between 1790 and 1800. She was missing from the 1810 cenus, either having died or married.
So, I'd say she's most likely the daughter of Thomas.

Catherine married William McVey in 1819.

"McVay, William (Gr); Hisem, Catherine (Gr); 18 Nov. 1819; (353); 111" - from "Washington County, Ohio Marriages, 1789-1840" by Bernice Graham and Elizabeth S. Cottle
Moses Williamson was the Justice of the Peace. Washington county is on the Ohio River, just below Monroe county, Ohio and across the river from Tyler county, West Virginia. (Gr) refers to Grandview township in which the riverport village of New Matamoras resides, directly across from the town of Friendly, West Virginia.

By 1820 William and Catherine had moved to Doniphan county, Kansas where their son Benjamin Franklin McVay [McVey] was born. Catherine died on 1 October 1865 in Buchanon county, Missouri and was buried in the Old Sparta Cemetery.

Steve Hissem
San Diego, California