Heysham Arms

The Hissem-Montague Family

Montague Arms

Home | Gernet Forebears | In England | Heesom in America | Heysham in America | Other English Colonies | Montague Family | Other Family's | Links


The Montagues in New England

Two of the sons of the Boveney Montague family emigrated to America. One, Peter, went to the Virginia colony at Jamestown. The other, Richard, went to the Massachusetts Bay colony. I worked out the genealogy below some time ago, and was fairly proud of the work I did on the Zenas Montague branch. I was excited to find the following reference confirming my work, but also disappointed that it obviated it as well.

"It is possible that an occassional correspondence was maintained between the English and Hadley Montagues. There was communications, at least in the ealy part of the last century, between Richard's children and their kin abroad; and the fact that there is yet preserved, as I am told, an ivory-headed cane, said to have been sent from England to Peter Montague, Richard's son, in 1700, with directions that it should pass from Peter to Peter, so long as Peters should be born, is evidence that the American emigrants were not forgotten in their native land."

. . .

"Note 9.--Page 19.

This cane is now owned by Peter Ross Montague, Mina, Chautaqua County, New York. He is son of Zenas, son of Peter, son of Moses, son of John, son of Richard the first in Hadley."

- from "Meething of the Montague Family of Hadley, Mass., Aug. 2, 1882"
My only dispute with this descent is that it omits one generation, (19) Peter Montague (1690), the son of John.

Of even greater interest is a note I recently found on the internet in a Montague genealogy forum. It said that Y-DNA tests of descendents of both Peter and Richard Montague had been done and that these showed a close enough affinity to prove that Peter and Richard were most likely brothers. Looking at the Family Tree DNA site, it looks like Richard's line is haplogroup R1b, which is expected from a family with English origins; R1B is the dominant type along the Atlantic shore from Spain through France and into England. More precisely, the Montagues are R1b1b2a1a1d (R-Z8), a major branching that occurrd in about 1200 BC among the Germanic tribes of central Europe. This may mean that the family came over during the 5th century Anglo-Saxon invasion.

On a similar note, I recently had my wife's mtDNA done. She is Anita Montague, of the Richard Montague line. The result was U5b2c2.

mtDNA

U5 appears to be the dominant European maternal lineage among Paleolithic and Mesolithic hunter-gatherer groups. During the last glacial maximum, around 12,000 years ago, this group retreated to refuges in southern Europe, along with the male R1b group.

U52bc2 is found in the British Isles, France, Germany and Scandanavia.


(17) Richard Montague (1614)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536) (16) Peter Montague (1573)

The G-G-G-G-G-G-G-G-Grandfather of my wife, Anita Montague Hissem. Richard was the third son of Peter Montague, of the Boveney Montagues, and was born in 1614 in Boveney, Burnham Parish, Buckingham, England.

I've recently received an enlightening email on the subject of Richard's birth from Richard W. Montague of Ebenhausen, Germany.

"Dear Mr. Hissem:

I have exciting news which I would like to share with you. A documented historic record for the actual date of birth (DOB) as well as place of birth (POB) for Richard Montague I, the pioneer English settler of Hadley, Massachusetts has been discovered.

Richard I’s date of birth (old style) is May 29, 1614 and his place of birth is Warfield, Berkshire, England.

These newly discovered data stem from baptism records (“Bishop’s Transcripts for Warfield Parish”) in the “Wiltshire Records Office, Throwbridge” which provide data for the children of Peter and Ellen Mountague. The reference to the “Wiltshire Records Office, Throwbridge” means, today, the Wiltshire and Swindon History Center, Cocklebury Road, Chippenham, Wiltsire SN153QN, in the United Kingdom.

Brame is not the original discoverer of this new data regarding Richard I and his siblings. The credit goes to Roger Blackman who first published this information in The Magazine of the Berkshire Family History Society, Spring 1986. Brame cites Blackman as his source for the information. Apparently, Myrtle Stevens Hyde, author of “The English Origin of Peter and Richard Montague” (New England Historical and Genealogical Register, April 1988) was also not aware of Blackman’s discovery.

Peter and Ellen Mountague were the mother and father of Richard I, the Hadley settler as well as of Peter I, the pioneer English settler in Virginia.

The data are:
Richard Mountague May 29, 1614
Margaret Mountauge March 8, 1617
Robert Mountague January 27, 1621/22

Until this discovery, it was generally held that Richard I had been born in Boveney in Buckinghamshire on the north side of the Thames River. Warfield is located in Berkshire a few miles south of the Thames River. Boveney and Warfield, on opposite sides of the Thames River, are relatively near Windsor Castle. In previous accounts of the American Montague Family it had been assumed that Richard I’s birthday was “around 1614” and that his POB had been Boveney.

Background

I recently learned from a fellow Montague Family historiographer (Robert V. Montague, iii of Florida) that Arden H. Brame, Jr. (now deceased) had authored in 1991 an article entitled The One and Only Peter Mountague (1603-1659) of Warfield, Berkshire, England and Nansemond, Isle of Wight and Lancaster Counties, Virginia. Brame’s article appeared in the Augustan Society’s Omnibus (Book 13) in October 1991. The Augustan Society is a collection of scholars who focus on fields of genealogy and of heraldry. Society was formed in 1957 and is headquartered today in Orlando, Florida.

Although Brame’s article deals primarily with Peter Mountague I of Virginia, the his account also mentions “new” data on the DOB and POB of Richard Montague I. I had not been aware of Brame’s article until Robert V. Montague called them to my attention.

Brame concludes that POB and DOB data on the 1634 Herald’s Visitation of Buckinghamshire should be augmented to show the following additional data, viz:
William Mountague March 6, 1596/97 at Dorney
Peter Mountague 1603 at Boveney or Warfield
Richard Mountague May 29, 1614 at Warfield
Margaret Mountague March 8, 1617 at Warfield
Elizabeth Mountague ca. 1619 at Warfield
Robert Mountague January 27, 1621/22 at Warfield
Ann Mountague ca. 1624 at Warfield

This 1634 Visitation had earlier been considered to be the oldest extant written record regarding Peter I and Richard I.

Brame’s discovery in the records of Berkshire is an interesting new discovery. The HGMFA, for example, states categorically:

“Richard Montague was the son of Peter and Eleanor Montague of Boveney, Parish Burnham, Buckinghamshire, England. His mother, Eleanor, was the daughter of William Allen of Burnham, in the same parish. Richard was born about 1614 in Boveney, where his ancestors for several generations had resided.” (HGMFA, page 43.)

Today, it is certain that the authors of the HGMFA (published in 1886) or of the Meeting (published in 1882) were not aware of the existence of records for Richard I’s date of birth in Berkshire. The HGMFA does not give a source for the claim that Boveney was the birthplace for Richard I, nor does book Meeting of the Montague Family. The justification for the claim that Boveney was Richard I’s birthplace must have been a Montague family oral tradition within the “Hadley” branch of the Montague Family."

I asked Richard if he had a theory for the birth being registered outside Boveney.
"Regarding your question whether there is any “historical data” which would explain why Richard I was born in Warfield, Berkshire on May 29, 1614 (old style), I am afraid that I have to draw a blank. To my knowledge, only Myrtle Stevens Hyde, to date, looked into such questions. I would suggest that you refer to her seminal article, “The English Origins of Peter and Richard Montague,” which appeared in the April 1988 issue of the New England Historical Genealogical Register.

To summarize, Mrs. Hyde states that Robert Montague (ca. 1505-1575/6), a yeoman farmer, was probably born and died in Burnham. He married Margaret Catton (Cotton or Calton), whose parents may have come from Warfield. The marriage of Robert and Margaret produced six children, one of whom, the third-born, child was William.

This William Montague (ca. 1536-1594/5) was probably born in Boveney. He married Margaret Grove in 1560. Both were apparently residents of Boveney. Their marriage produced seven children, the last born of whom was Peter Montague (ca. 1573-1638/9). No place of birth is known for Peter, but his elder siblings were born either in Dorney or in Burnham.

This Peter Montague probably grew up in Boveney, across the Thames River from Windsor Castle. He married Ellen/Helen Allen, probably in 1596, who was born in Burnham (Boveney during this period belonged to the Parish of Burnham). Their marriage produced seven, among whom was the third-born child Peter (the ancestor of the Virginia Montague line) as well as the seventh-born child Richard (the ancestor of the Massachusetts Montague line). Sometime prior to 1630, and perhaps much earlier, Peter Montague and his wife Ellen/Helen Allen moved with their children across the Thames River to Warfield on the south side of the river. The ancient location of Warfield village is about five miles southwest, across the river, from Boveney.

Montague Residences

The paragraphs above suggest that the Montague family lived at various locations near to Windsor Castle and at various times on both north and on the south banks of the Thames River during the period 1500-1650. Why the several generations of the family chose to live on the north side and then on the south side of the river is a subject of conjecture. Perhaps the several generations owned or worked parcels of land on both sides of the river. There could be other reasons as well, such as periodic flooding of the Thames which put large portions of the meadow-lands under water.

The Visitation of the county of Buckingham made in 1634, conducted by John Philipot, styles the family as “Montague, of Boveney” and provides a coat-of-arms: 3 lozenges conjoined in pale G, inter 3 roundles S. The “fixing” would suggest that Peter (“now in Virginia 1634), Richard, Robert, William, Elizabeth, and Ann considered Boveney their place of residence during Philipot’s survey of the residents of Buckinghamshire."

Richard was listed in the visitation of 1634, still living at Boveny, England. In the visitation Richard's name was annotated "3 sonne." I used to think this meant he had 3 sons, just as his next brother, Robert "4 sonne," must have had 4 sons. I now realize this meant Richard was the third son of his father, Peter. Note that his brother, Peter, was shown as already living in Virginia at this time. See the "History and Genealogy of the Montague Family in America" by George William Montague.

The figure at left is from a miniature of Richard Montague. It was owned by William H. Montague, of Boston. It was mentioned in the published report of the Montague family reunion in 1882 and a grainy photographic reproduction was included in that book. The Montague Family at Hadley stated that the miniature "was doubtless painted in England and the youth of its subject is consistent with the traditions relative to the date of Richard's emigration to America, as is the depicted Cromwellian style of dress." A recent commenter has written:

"Richard Montague in his 20's – The date when the miniature cameo portrait (on copper plate) was first made has not been established nor is has it been established that the cameo portrait was made in England before Richard I’s departure to New England. If it could be located today, the cameo would be the oldest surviving Montague Family artefact in the United States. It is last recorded in Boston in the early 1900s. — The reproduction of Richard I’s signature is a copy of the signature which appears on his last will and testament, reproduced in HGMFA (History and Genealogy of the Montague Family of America)."

Richard married Abigail Downing on 8 November 1637 in Norwich, Nofolk, England. She was the daughter of the Reverend Joseph Downing, rector of Layer Marney, Essex, England [or of St. Stephen's, Ispwich] and his wife, Jane Rose. Abigail was baptized on 5 October 1617 at the St. Lawrence church, Ipswich, Suffolk, England. Joseph Downing's eldest brother, Emanuel, a barrister, had founded the American Downing family in Salem, Massachusetts in 1638. Emanuel married the sister of John Winthrop, the governor of Massachusetts, and mentioned Abigail as "my cousin Mountagew" [sic] in a letter to John.

I wonder how Richard and Abigail met? Boveney and Norwich are not that close; and what was Abigail doing getting married in Norwich when she was born in Suffolk and her father preached in Essex? Alternatively, I've heard that the couple married in America. Perhaps Abigail lived with her uncle, Emanuel, in Salem before marrying. Or, the couple eloped, marrying in Norwich before taking ship, at Great Yarmouth, for America.

Richard arrived in New England in 1634 [1638?] in the ship SPEEDWELL. This was a common name for ships of the period. The MAYFLOWER Pilgrims originally had a second ship of that name, though it proved unseaworthy, and during the 1630's there was a SPEEDWELL that made a number of transatlantic crossings to both the Massachusetts and Virginia colonies hauling new settlers.

The couple had settled in Wells, York county, Maine by about 1641. Wells is on the southern most coast of Maine, just north of the border with New Hampshire. Richard and Abigail must have been some of the earliest settlers since most histories date the settlement to a grant in 1641 to the Reverend John Wheelwright and other settlers from Exeter, New Hampshire. Note that Maine was part of the Massachusetts Bay colony at the time.

As some point after 1642, when his daughter Mary was born in Wells, and perhaps as late as 1646, Richard moved to Boston, Suffolk county, Massachusetts, where his daughters, Sarah and Martha, were born. His occupation was listed as miller, a baker, and a farmer. His wife, Abigail, became a member of the First Church of Boston on 26 April 1646.


Boston

The vanguard of English settlers led by Reverend William Blaxton arrived in the Boston area in 1624, less than four years after the Pilgrims arrived in nearby Plymouth. The colony of Massachusetts Bay was established six years later in 1630 when the elder John Winthrop, official representative of the Massachusetts Bay Company, took up residence. From the beginning Boston was the center of Puritan culture and life in the New World.

In 1651 Richard moved to Wethersfield, Connecticut where he lived until 1659. On 25 May 1651 his wife, Abigail, officially transferred from the First Church, Boston to the church in Wethersfield. Richard worked as a miller and baker in Wethersfiled. A biography states that,

"They had money also for the purchase of much land, and the tools of a miller and baker, as well as a modest library of books." - from "The Founders: Portraits of Persons Born Abroad who Came to the Colonies in North America Before the Year 1701" by Charles Knowles Bolton, 1919
His children Peter, Abigail and John were born there.

Wethersfield

This town was founded in 1633-34 and is the most ancient in the colony of Connecticut. It is just south of Hartford on the Connecticut river. The land in this region is far more fertile than the flinty soil of the coastlands around Boston.

Around 1660 Richard joined in a compact with 59 men from Hartford and the surronding area to establish a village to the north. There appears to have been some kind of falling-out amongst the local parishoners and Richard's group had decided to create their own church. The group moved up the Connecticut river and founded the village of Hadley, in Massachusetts. This was in the midst of the rich farmland of the Connecticut River Valley.

The Connecticut River Valley

In 1634 the best land in the coastal communities of Massachusetts were already taken and petitions were received by the local government to authorize settlement in the Connecticut valley in western Massachusetts.

In 1636 settlement began in Hartford and Springfield, an area now known as Pioneer Valley, but this was the hunting ground of the Pequot Indians and the first Indian war of New England resulted. The Pequot, however, were quickly defeated and settlement grew. In 1675 King Philip's War, another Indian uprising named for Chief King Philip of the Wampoag, began. It was a wide-scale conflict and resulted in the destruction of many settlements and the contraction of the English population back to the coastal communities. The town of Hadley was an exception and continued to be occupied throughout the war and its termination in 1677 with King Philip's defeat and death. Indian attacks and full-scale wars continued sporadically and the area was not truly at peace until after the American Revolution.

After the prime coastal and valley locations had been settled migration began to move, not west, but north up the Connecticut river into Vermont. Attempts were made to settle the hill-sides and mountain tops, but the land was poor and after a few years most settlers chose to move on. Those that stayed became part of an impoverished under-class, the source of discontent that lead to Shay's Rebellion in the 1780's.

Note on the map to the left the towns coming up the Connecticut river, from the south: On the eastern shore, South Hadley, Hadley, Sunderland, Leverett and Montague. On the western shore is Hatfield, Whately and Deerfield. Further west is Westhampton. All of these villages and towns were settled by members of the Montague family [and the Wells family, as you'll read about on the Wells Family page]. Further to the east is a lake.


Hadley, Massachusetts

A dissenting Connecticut congregation under the leadership of the Reverend John Russell founded Hadley in 1659 as an agricultural community on the east bank of the Connecticut River. It was located on a fertile peninsular plain defined by a bend in the Connecticut River, purchased from the Indians. The first settlers laid out this area, formerly known as the Norwottuck Meadow, as the center of the new settlement before their arrival, with the Town Common, referred to as "the Broad Street," as the central feature. The common measured 20 rods wide and one mile long, with the Connecticut River defining both ends. Eight-acre home lots were ranged along both sides of the common, with farmlands behind.

In 1675-76, during King Philip's War, to guard against Indian attacks, a palisade that ran far enough behind the houses to include most of the barns and farm buildings enclosed the street and common.

Through the years, the common remained the focus of town life. The meetinghouse occupied a prominent site. Animals were pastured on the open land, militia drill were held periodically, and Hadley's Liberty Pole was erected there during the Revolutionary War. Taverns at the north and south ends and at the center of the common served the needs of passengers on the ferry, stagecoach, and riverboat routes.

As the number of settlers south of Mount Holyoke grew, the towns of Hatfield, Granby, South Hadley and Amherst formed from the sprawling town of Hadley.

Richard received a land grant in 1661 in the village of Hadley. Note on the property plat of 1663, above, that Richard Montague's lot is shown on the right hand side, near the top, directly across from the meeting house. Just below him is the lot of John Dickinson, the forebear of Emily Dickinson, the poet. Look further down and notice the lot of Thomas Wells. This was the older brother of John Wells, who is, I think, the forebear of the Wells side of my wife's family. Three lots above that of Richard Montague is a lot for Thomas Coleman, the step-father of Thomas and John Wells.

Richard Montague continued to work as a miller and baker, but also farmed. He was elected as a Selectman in 1671 and 1677, a freeman in 1680, and Clerk of Writs in 1681 - from "The Compendium of American Genealogy," Virkus.

Town Governance

The Selectman sat on the Selectboard which provided general supervision and control over the town, enacted ordinances, regulations and policies for the town and oversaw town property and personnel, and prepared and managed the budget. They were also a board of health.

A freeman appears to have been an adult male who took upon himself the responsibility to be a full legal member of the community. See the oath of a freeman, below.

The Clerk of Writs was the town clerk and was responsible for recording births, deaths and marriages.


The Oath of a Freeman, or of a Man to be made free.

"I, A B, etc., being, by the Almighty's most wise disposition, become a member of this body, consisting of the Governor, Deputy Governor, Assistants and a commonalty of the Mattachusets in New England, do freely and sincerely acknowledge that I am justly and lawfully subject to the government of the same, and do accordingly submit my person and estate to be protected, ordered, and governed by the laws and constitutions thereof, and do faithfully promise to be from time to time obedient and conformable thereunto, and to the authority of the said Governor and Assistants and their successors, and to all such laws, orders, sentences, and decrees as shall be lawfully made and published by them or their successors; and I will always endeavor (as in duty I am bound) to advance the peace and welfare of this body or commonwealth to my utmost skill and ability; and I will, to my best power and means, seek to divert and prevent whatsoever may tend to the ruin or damage thereof, or of any the said Governor, Deputy Governor, or Assistants, or any of them or their successors, and will give speedy notice to them, or some of them, of any sedition, violence, treachery, or other hurt or evil which I shall know, hear, or vehemently suspect to be plotted or intended against the said commonwealth, or the said government established; and I will not at any time suffer or give consent to any counsel or attempt that shall be done, given, or attempted for the impeachment of the said government, or making any change alteration of the same, contrary to the laws and ordinances thereof, but shall do my utmost endeavor to discover, oppose, and hinder all and every such counsel and attempt. So help me God."

In 1675 a large scale war broke out between the settlers and the local Indian tribes upon whom they were encroaching. Many towns in the Connecticutt river valley were attacked and a number of the settlers fled east. An expedition to recover crops from abandoned fields around Deerfield was on its way to a grist mill north of Hadley when it was ambushed and wiped out at what became known as the Battle of Bloody Brook. As a result of this debacle the village of Deerfield was abandoned, and later destroyed by the Indians. Springfield, just south of Hadley, was attacked in October and 45 of its 60 homes were burnt to the ground. Throughout the winter the Springfield survivors held out against a siege while Indians attacked and destroyed more settlements throughout the colony.
















The Angel of Hadley

In 1676, at the height of the War, the war leader of the Wampanoag used a ruse to lure away the bulk of the colonial troops to the north. Without the protection of professional soldiers, the natives then prepared to attack the lightly defended town of Hadley, Massachusetts. However the settlers discovered the plot and despaired for their lives knowing they lacked any military expertise. With all hope seemingly lost, a white-bearded man with a powerful bearing and wielding an old sword suddenly appeared. He raised and organized a town militia before leading them to victory against the superior numbers of Wampanoag. He then disappeared.

Or so they say. Most historians doubt an attack on the town occurred in 1675. This sounds more like the attack on Springfield in October 1675. The town's militia had been sent north, to reinforce Hadley, when the Indians attacked and destroyed most of the homes, as well as the grist mill.

In the spring, Longmeadow, near Springfield, was attacked. However, by this time the colonists were beginnning to get the upper hand, which included raising the siege of Springfield. The Connecticut River towns managed their crops by limiting the amount of land under cultivation and working in large armed groups for self protection. Springfield, Hatfield and Hadley were fortified and their militia's reinforced. They held their ground though attacked several times. Smaller towns were abandoned, to await better times. An attack on Hadley on 12 June 1676 was defeated with the help of 500 militia from Connecticut and Mohegan allies. The Mohegan were part of the Iroquis confederation, bitter enemies of the Algonquin tribes of New England. This assault on Hadley would prove to be the last coordinated native military action in the valley.

By August 1676 the war was all but over. The Indians were running low on supplies, especially powder and shot, while roving bands of colonial militia had discovered, and destroyed, their crops causing widespread hunger. At that point the leader of the Wampanoag, a leader of the war, was killed, and the Indians sued for peace.

While the war was a calamity for the region, it taught the settlers their strength and changed their attitude to the government in England, who had provided no help during the emergency. Was Richard, a Selectman of the village, a volunteer with the militia? He would have been 53 years old, so he was outside the normal age limits, but when Indians attacked Hadley in 1676 all able bodied men would have manned the stockade walls, whether to shoot or fill cartridges. Richard's son, Peter, was a soldier with the militia and while I don't have any records of service for his younger son, John, at the age of 20-21 he would have necessarily have joined.

Richard signed a will on 8 July 1681 in Hadley naming his wife, Abigail, and son, John, as executors. He died on 14 December 1681 in Hadley, Hampshire county, Massachusetts. Abigail died on 8 November 1694 in Hadley, at the age of 77. The inventory of her estate was taken on 21 November 1694 by Samuel Partridge and Samuel Smith.

There is a tombstone for Richard in the Hadley cemetery. It was erected by a descendent, George Montague, in 1881 to replace the original stone, weathered by time.


The Town of Montague

Montague is a picturesque town in western Massachusetts, near Amherst. It is in the south-easterly section of Franklin County, on the left bank of the Connecticut River. It was originally settled in the early eighteenth century (1715). Hadley is a near-by village. Sunderland is to the south.

While it might be assumed that the town was named after the prominent Montague family of Hadley, in fact it was named in honor of Captain William Montague, a member of the aristocratic Montague family of England. He was a Royal Navy Captain, known as “Mad Montague” for his aggressive tactics and sometimes aberrant behavior. This honor was most likely due to the fact that he commanded the 40-gun ship "Mermaid" at the taking of the French fortress of Louisburg in Nova Scotia during the Seven Years War.

Despite the above, it can be assumed that the presence of a distinguished pioneer family, if only known locally, had some impact on the naming of this town.

A family researcher, Richard Montague, writes,

"Dear Fellow “Hadley” Montague Cousins:

Today, December 14th, is a special day in our family history, since we mark on this day the death of our original ancestor in New England: Richard Mountague. Richard was born on May 29, 1614 in Warfield, Berkshire, England (as modern genealogical research shows) not as has traditionally assumed in Boveney, Buckinghamshire. The hamlets of Warfield and Boveney are close to each other, but on opposite sides of the Thames River, not too far distant from Windsor Castle.

Richard immigrated, probably for Puritan religious reasons, to the Massachusetts Bay Colony sometime prior to 1646, the year in which he and his wife Abigail Downing are first recorded in surviving written records. The date and place of their marriage is not known.

Their first child, Mary, was probably born in Wells, Maine around 1642. Two additional children, both daughters, Sarah and Martha, appear to have been born in Boston, respectfully in 1646 and 1647. Sarah, the second born child, died as an infant (4 days old).

Richard and Abigail lived in/near Boston before moving with their children in 1651 to the Wethersfield Settlement on the Connecticut River. At least three additional children were born in Wethersfield: Peter (1651), Abigail (1653) and John (1655 or 1656). Our “Hadley” Montague line traces its origin to Richard’s son John. John’s older brother, Peter, died sine prole.

Richard lived a long life, since at this death he was more than 67 years of age, an unusual age in the Massachusetts Bay Colony of the seventeenth century. His wife Abigail lived for almost 13 years after her husband’s death.

Both Richard and Abigail were buried on the Old Burial Grounds of Hadley’s Grand Meadow. No headstone for Richard or for his wife Abigail survives. A number of early Montague Family graves, however, are located in the extreme north-western edge of the cemetery, near the current site of the Memorial Tablet to Richard I, erected by George William Montague and Charles C. Montague, in August 1881, two hundred years after the death of the pioneer Montague settler.

Make a pilgrimage this coming year, if you can, to visit Hadley’s Old Burial Grounds and walk again Middle Street, the street on which Richard built his log house in the early 1660s. The original dwelling is no longer standing, but the location on Middle Street can be easily determined.

Stay in touch! Cousin Richard (Richard W. Montague, Rosenstrasse 4, D-82067 Ebenhausen/Bavaria, GERMANY)"

Richard's children were,
(18) Mary Montague (1642), Wells, York county, Maine, m. Joseph Warriner 22 November 1668, d. 22 July 1689, Enfield, Hartford county, Connecticut
(18) Sarah Montague (1646), b. 15 June 1646, Boston, Massachusetts
(18) Martha Montague (1647)
(18) Peter Montague (1651)
(18) Aaron Montague (1651)
(18) John Montague (c1655)
(18) Abigail Montague (c1656), m. Mark Warner 8 December 1671, d. 6 February 1705

(18) Peter Montague (1651)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614)

He was born on 8 July 1651 in Wethersfield, Hartford county, Connecticut [though it is possible that he was born in Boston, it was early in 1651 that his father had moved the family to Wethersfield]. Peter was in the famous Falls Fight on 19 May 1676, as was his brother-in-law, Martha's husband, who was killed.

Falls Fight

Peskeompskut was a traditional gathering place for Native peoples. Located at the falls on the Connecticut River in present-day Montague, Massachusetts, Peskeompskut was an ideal place to meet, to fish and to trade. Salmon and shad spawned at the falls, and the river provided quick and easy transportation.

During King Philip's War (1675-1676), several hundred Native people gathered there to replenish food supplies and to launch a series of raids against English towns in Hampshire County. On May 19, 1676, Captain William Turner of Northampton led 150 mounted settlers from Hatfield, Northampton and Hadley in a surprise attack on Peskeompskut. Falling on the sleeping camp at daybreak, the English attackers killed as many as two hundred people, most of them women and children. They also burned the camp and destroyed valuable food supplies.

The English withdrawal turned into disorganized flight when Native warriors from a nearby camp arrived and cut off their escape route. Severely wounded, Captain Turner died at the Green River in present-day Greenfield. English casualties mounted as warriors harassed the inexperienced soldiers all the way to Hatfield. Nevertheless, the attack by Turner and his men was a terrible blow to Native resistance and hastened the end of King Philip's War.

The area of Peskeompskut remains known as Turners Falls to commemorate the attack Turner led.

Peter was a Selectman of Hadley in the years 1682, 1687, 1689, 1694, 1701 , 1703, 1705, and 1708. He was a representative at Boston in the General Court for four terms.

Peter married Mary Partridge, the widow of John Smith, on 16 September 1679 at Hadley. She was baptized on 16 October 1647 in Hartford, Connecticut, the daughter of William Partrdige and Mary Smith. She died on 20 May 1680.

Peter then married Mary Crow, the widow of Noah Coleman [see the founders of Hadley], on 16 September 1680. She was born on 27 December 1656 in Hadley, the daughter of John Crow and Elizabeth Goodwin. She died on 12 October 1720 in Hadley.

Finally, Peter married Mary Smith, the widow of Preserved Smith, on 22 April 1721. She was born on 16 August 1681 in Hadley, the daughter of Chileab Smith and Hannah Hitchcock. This marrying of widows is suspicious. Was Peter perhaps too interested in their husband's fortunes?

Peter died on 27 March 1725 in Hadley, Hampshire county, Massachusetts, at the age of 73. He had no children, but left a good estate to his relatives. His tombstone in Hadley:

A family researcher, Richard Montague, sent me the following information about Peter Montague.

Peter Mountague gave a silver Communion Cup to the Church of Christ in Hadley, Massachusetts in 1723. This piece of Colonial period silver hollowware, the work of John Dixwell, an early Boston-based silversmith, in now on permanent loan to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

"The donor of the cup, Peter Mountague (1651-1725), led an interesting life in the Connecticut River valley of western Massachusetts. His parents, Richard Mountague and Abigail Downing, had both been born in England and had come to New England sometime before the mid 1640s as colonists. The dates and places of their arrival in the New World are not known.

Peter Mountague (the spelling of his surname which he used) was probably born in Wethersfield, Connecticut in July 1651. Together with his father and mother and his four siblings sisters, he travelled from Wethersfield in 1659/1660 further up the Connecticut River to help found the new religious settlement of Hadley, in Hampshire County, on the Connecticut River.

The General Court in Boston created Hampshire County in 1662 out of lands originally apportioned to Middlesex County, which had been one of the four original countries organized in 1643 by the Massachusetts Bay Colony. By moving upriver into Hampshire County, Richard Montague and his family became colonists of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Their previous in Wethersfield was part of the Province of Connecticut, which had been organized in 1636 as a “haven for Puritan gentlemen.”

The colonists chose the name Hadley for their settlement in honor of Hadley (Hadleigh), Suffolk County in England’s East Anglia region. Many of the pioneer settlers of Hadley had their origin in East Anglia, but not Richard Mountague, who was born in Berkshire County on the Thames River.

His father, Richard Montague, was born (according to the latest historical research) in Warfield, Berkshire, England in May 1614. Warfield, Richard’s actual birthplace, lies south across the Thames River in Berkshire, approximately opposite Boveney, Buckinghamshire, Richard’s traditional birthplace. Richard died at Hadley in December 1681 and was buried on the Grand Meadow. His wife Abigail died at Hadley in November 1694 was presumably buried next to her husband on the Grand Meadow. No gravestones on the Grand Meadow mark the precise location of their burials. Richard Mountague had four daughters, but only two sons: Peter Mountague (1651-1725) and John Mountague (1655/56-1732). Consequently, all currently living “Hadley” Montagues trace their lineage to John Mountague, since Peter died in 1725 sine prole.

Peter Mountague became one of the wealthiest and most prominent men in Hadley. He was elected, for example, by his fellow Hadley settlers to serve in Boston on four occasions on the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the ruling legislative body of the Colony. Curiously, however, Richard Mountague, in his last will and testament made shortly before his death, names his “beloved wife” Abigail and “loving son” John Mountague as his sole executors. Peter Mountague, his first born son, was not named an executor, although he is specifically mentioned in the will. Peter married three times, but had no children by any of wives. His first marriage was to Mary Partridge, whose family had been one of the original English settlers of Hadley. Mary was a widow, having been married previously to John Smith of Hadley. Mary died in May 1680. Following her death, Peter married for a second time in September 1680 Mary Coleman, who was the widow of Noah Coleman. Mary Coleman was the daughter to John Crow, also an early English settler of Hadley. The second Mary died in October 1720.

Following the death of his second wife, Peter married his sister-in-law, Mary Smith, the daughter of Chileab Smith, who had previously been married to Preserved Smith. Mary Smith’s sister, Hannah Smith, married Peter Mountague’s younger brother, John Mountague. All three of Peter’s wives stemmed from fellow English settler families in Hadley. About two years before his death in March 1725, Peter donated an impressive silver hollowware communion cup to the Hadley Church (now the First Congregational Church). The cup is the work of John Dixwell (1680-1725), an early English silver smith working in Colonial Boston. It is probably that Peter Mountague dealt directly with Dixwell as a result of Peter’s frequent visits to Boston to serve on the General Court. It is likely that Peter furnished the silver required, in the form of English silver coins, for Dixwell to fashion the cup. The melting down of specie was the customary Colonial practice to provide metal for the manufacture of silver items, as there were no silver mines in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Since 1939, the cup has been on permanent loan to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. The first three or four generations of “Hadley” Montagues spelled their surname M o u n t a g u e on wills and gravestones. Josiah Montague (1727-1810), the great- grandson of Richard, appears to be the first to use the spelling M o n t a g u e instead of M o u n t a g u e. Succeeding generations of Hadley-origin Montagues have continued this spelling of our name.

If you are in Boston and have the time, do try to see the Peter Mountague communion cup! Genealogically Yours,"

Your Montague Cousin Richard

(18) Aaron Montague (1651)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614)

Aaron appears to be Peter's twin brother, also born on 8 July 1651 in Wethersfield.

(18) John Montague (c1655)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614)

Anita's G-G-G-G-G-G-G-Grandfather and Richard's youngest son. He was named, along with his mother Abigail, as his father's executor. He was born in about 1655 in Wethersfield, Hartford county, Connecticut and moved to Hadley, Massachusetts with his parents in 1659.

John married Hannah Smith on 23 March 1681 in Hadley. She was born on 7 July 1662 in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts, the daughter of Chileab Smith and Hannah Hitchcock. She was the sister of Mary Smith, the third wife of John's elder brother, Peter, above.

John had been married for only a short time when his father died. The couple then lived on the family homestead with his widowed mother. John was a selectman of Hadley and remained on the family farm until his death. Hannah died in about 1694 in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts. There is no tombstone extant in the Hadley cemetery, though it is probable that John was buried here. In 1936 there was a flood of the Connecticut river that left many tombstones broken and scattered. Some of the grave markers were washed away and retrieved miles down river.

John's children were,
(19) John Montague (1681)
(19) Richard Montague (1684)
(19) Hannah Montague b. 8 Aug 1687, d. Nov 1688
(19) Hannah Montague b. 21 Mar 1689, d. 19 Apr 1689
(19) Peter Montague (1690)
(19) William Montague (1692)
(19) Deacon Samuel Montague (1695)
(19) Hannah Montague (1697)
(19) Lieutenant Luke Montague (1699)
(19) Nathaniel Montague (1704)

(19) John Montague (1681)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655)

He was born on 31 December 1681 in Hadley on the original homestead of his grandfather, Richard Montague. The original lot of eight acres was divided and upon the southern half of it John built a new house in about 1705. That house was still standing in 1886. By some, he was considered to be the greatest man and farmer in his day in Hadley.

On 29 February 1704, in what became known as the Meadow Fight, John joined other Hadley men in driving away an Indian assault on the village of Deerfield. It is not certain if he was also involved in the attempt to recover the captives taken in the destructive and memorable assault on the French and their Indian allies. Deerfield is about 12 miles north of Hadley.

The Deerfield Raid

On a cold February night in 1704, two hundred and forty French and Indian troops attacked the town of Deerfield, Massachusetts, the northwesternmost settlement of the New England colonies. The raiding party swept through the village, killing 56 of its residents, burning their homes, and taking over 100 captives.

The English settlers of the town had taken extra precautions, surrounding the village with a stockade, posting a guard at the gate, and garrisoning twenty soldiers among the townspeople. But the night of the raid, snow muffled the approach of the attackers and the drifts made it easier for them to scale the stockade and enter the town.

The British put up a fight, but they were overwhelmed. More than half of Deerfield’s two hundred and sixty residents were killed or captured. The French and Indian force headed for Canada with one hundred and nine captives in tow.

The 1704 skirmish came at a time when the fate of North America was still in doubt. The conflict in the New World was an extension of hostilities in Europe, where France and Britain were waging war against each other for control of the Spanish throne [The War of the Spanish Succession].

A British force pursued the raiders. During the first two days of the forced march, the Indians killed more than a dozen prisoners they deemed too weak to withstand the journey north. Captives considered valuable, such as healthy children, were carried on the shoulders of their abductors or pulled on dog sleds along with the wounded.

Those who survived the attack made a great effort to redeem the English abducted to Canada, but some captives remained there, adopted into Indian families.

John married twice. First to Mindwell [great name!] Lyman on 17 January 1712 in Northampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts. Northampton is a large village, to the west of Hadley. She was born on 30 August 1688 in Northampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts, probably the daughter of John Lyman. She died on 4 April 1713.

Next John married Abigail Smith on 29 September 1714. She was born on 26 October 1691, the daughter of John Smith and Mary Root. John died on 28 September 1722 in Hadley, at the age of 40. He was buried at Old Hadley Cemetery. His tombstone,

John's children with Mindwell were,
(20) Abigail Montague (1713), b. 20 March 1713, m. Nathan Moody 16 March 1734/5
(20) Mindwell Montague (1714), b. September 1714, d. 2 December 1715

John's children with Abigail were,
(20) John Montague (1716), b. 5 January 1716, m. 1st Rhoda Seldon, 2nd Thankful Sheldon 24 September 1747, d. 18 April 1783
(20) Jemima Montague (1719), b. 28 Janaury 1719, she married John Church 24 April 1741, d. 28 August 1812
(20) Mary Montague (1721), b. 8 November 1721, she married Jonathan Ingram 24 October 1743, d. 2 February 1808

(19) Richard Montague (1684)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655)

He was born on 16 March 1684 [or 1683] in Hadley, Hampshire County, Massachusetts. He was the son of John Montague and Hannah Smith. Richard Montague moved to Wethersfield, Hartford County, Connecticut. He purchased land there from Stephen Micks in April 1715 at and paid £17 current silver money for it.

He married Abigail Benton Camp on 28 July 1715 in Wethersfield. Abigail was born on 9 December 1691 in Hartford Connecticut, the widow of Joseph Camp and the daughter of Samuel Benton and Sarah Chatterton, of New Haven. Richard Montague purchased land from Jonathan Blyn for £80 on 15 January 1717 at Wethersfield, Connecticut.

Richard died on 24 December 1751 in Wethersfield, Connecticut at the age of 67 years. He was buried at Wethersfield Cemetery, Wethersfield, Hartford County, Connecticut. His tombstone reads:

"Here lies interred the body of Mr. Richard Mountague, who died Decbr the 24th 1751, in the 62d year of his age."
He is buried beside his wife, Abigail.

The inventory of his estate was taken on 3 January 1752 at Wethersfield, Connecticut. Abigail died on 9 May 1753.

The children of Richard Montague and Abigail Benton were,
(20) Abigail Montague, b. 11 Jul 1716, m. Nathaniel Riley, d. 6 Dec 1789
(20) Anne Montague, b. 16 May 1718, m. Timothy Sage 18 January 1753, d. 24 Jun 1797
(20) Richard Montague, b. 2 Aug 1721, d. 21 Dec 1721
(20) John Montague, b. 17 Oct 1722, m. Anna Belden 27 September 1750
(20) Martha Montague, b. 17 Mar 1726
(20) Mary Montague, b. 19 Apr 1728
(20) Richard Montague, b. 17 Mar 1730, m. Olive Nott 16 April 1752, d. 28 Aug 1815
(20) Hannah Montague, b. 16 Aug 1732, d. 26 Apr 1805
(20) Sarah Montague, b. 10 May 1736
(20) Lucy Montague, b. 25 Apr 1738

(19) Peter Montague (1690)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655)

Anita's G-G-G-G-G-G-Grandfather. He was born in May 1690 in Hadley, Hampshire county, Massachusetts. He married Mary Hubbard on 15 December 1715. She was born on 11 January 1694 in Hatfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, the daughter of Daniel Hubbard and Esther Rice. Mary's grandfather, John Hubbard, had moved from Wethersfield, Connecticut to Hadley in 1660, living just 4 lots below Richard Montague.

Peter and Mary moved to South Hadley in May 1719. At this time a number families from Hadley settled in South Hadley. The day previous to their departure the people assembled in the church, and it was a day of prayer and fasting, as "some of their number were going over the mountain to live." Peter's younger brothers, Luke and William, also moved to South Hadley.

Peter took up a large tract of land, and much of it has always remained in the possession of the Montagues, his descendants, passing from Peter to Moses, and from him to Elijah and to his children. The homestead of Elijah, which passed to his son, Obed, was built by Moses for his son, Seth, in 1791, and Seth lived there for awhile before he emigrated to Vermont. Peter's lot in South Hadley included the farm shown as owned by C.N. [Calvin Newton] Montague, in the top right hand corner in the map to the right, as well as the lot of Elijah Montague that was afterwards occupied by his son, Obed. Of the Montagues it was said, "they were a tall race, and were said to build the doorposts of their houses higher than common, "that a Montague might walk in with his hat on.""

Peter died in about 1749 in South Hadley. His estate was settled in that year, though an inventory was not presented until February 1756. Below is Peter's tombstone in the South Hadley cemetery.

His children were,
(20) Mary Montague, b. 4 March 1717, m. 1st Daniel Alexander, 2nd John Brown, 3rd J. Clark
(20) Anna Montague, b. 31 October 1718, m. Nathaniel Cole of Hatfield and Belchertown
(20) Elizabeth Montague, b. 13 November 1720, m. 1st Samuel Montague, son of Samuel Montague and Elizabeth White, on 12 Jul 1742 in Bennington, Benton, Vermont. (Samuel Montague was born on 30 Jun 1720 in Sunderland, Franklin, Massachusetts and died on 17 Jan 1777 in Bennington, Benton, Vermont.), 2nd Reverend James Smith
(20) Peter Montague (1723)
(20) Captain Moses Montague (1724)
(20) Josiah Montague (1727)
(20) Rachel Montague, m. 29 Nov 1753 Stephen Warner of Granby
(20) Experience Montague, b. circa 1728, m. 1st Jonathan Pierce in 1751, 2nd Philip Ingram of Amherst on 10 March 1756
(20) Adonijah Montague (1732)

(20) Peter Montague (1723)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690)

He was born on 2 January 1723 in South Hadley. He died in 1745 at the siege of Louisbourg in Canada where he served under the command of 'old' Seth Pomeroy of Northampton. He apparently had no children. Peter Jr. has a tombstone in the South Hadley cemetery, though I don't know if his body is actually there, or in Canada.


Louisbourg

This was a heavily fortified seaport and capital of the French colony of Ile Royale some six hundred miles northeast of Boston. Ile Royale was comprised of present-day Cape Breton and Prince Edward Island.

An uneasy peace had existed between England and France since 1713, when the Treaty of Utrecht brought the War of Spanish Succession, called Queen Anne's War by the British colonists, to a close. That peace ended in March 1744 when France declared war on Great Britain. The War of Austrian Succession, or King George's War, soon engulfed the belligerents' North American colonies, the French at Louisbourg gaining an initial advantage when they received news of the state of war in early May, three weeks in advance of their English counterparts in Boston.

The colonists of New England, after initial setbacks, decided to take the war to the French and assault the fortress of Louisbourg. Ben Franklin warned his brother, then living in Massachusetts, that "fortified towns are hard nuts to crack; and your teeth are not been accustomed to it. Taking strong places is a particular trade, which you have taken up without serving an apprenticeship to it. . . . But some seem to think forts are as easy taken as snuff."

The colonists raised a land force of four thousand and vessels sufficient to carry the force to Louisbourg. William Pepperrell, a well-known merchant, member of the Massachusetts Council, and militia officer from Kittery, Maine, became the expedition's commander.

Meanwhile, the defenses at Louisbourg had been allowed to deteriorate and the morale of the garrison was low; they had even mutineed in the previous December.

The fortress was besieged and placed under heavy bombardment from the neighboring heights. Unsupported by their own government in France, which only found out about the fort's dire straits at the end of the summer, they capitulated in June 1745.

Paris was stunned that its strongest North American post could be taken by an untrained army of provincials. Boston, however, received the news with joyous celebrations. And London, for its part, was overjoyed at word of Louisbourg's capture. Honors, tributes and testimonials were heaped upon the victors. Pepperrell became a baronet and was given the right to raise regiments, an honor that provided remuneration as well as status.

Seth Pomeroy

Pomeroy was a Major in the Fourth Massachusetts Regiment commanded by Colonel Samuel Willard. At Louisbourg he was to put his occupation of that as a gunsmith to very good use. Seth Pomeroy is as about a genuine American hero as one might find. Not only did he see service at Louisbourg, but was also with Johnson at the Battle of Lake George, New York in 1755. As an old man, just as determined as ever, he was with the revolutionaries at Bunker Hill in 1775.


(20) Captain Moses Montague (1724)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690)

Anita's G-G-G-G-G-Grandfather. He was born on 17 November 1724 in South Hadley, Massachusetts. He married Sarah Graves of Sunderland, Massachusetts on 22 September 1748. She was born on 9 February 1726, the daughter of Jonathan Graves and Mary Janes. Much of the information on the family comes from the "History of Hadley, Massachusetts 1863."

Given the title of Captain, Moses commanded a company of Minutemen at the Lexington Alarm of 19 April 1775 in Colonel Ruggles Woodbridge's regiment. "Moses Montague (1724-92) commanded a company in Col. Ruggles Woodbridge's regiment at the Lexington Alarm. He served under Col. Israel Chapin to reinforce the Continental Army and later commanded the 2nd company, Porter's Hampshire County regiment. He was born and died in South Hadley, Mass." - from the "Lineage Book of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution" He entered service on 20 April 1775, serving for 15 2/3 days.

"[O]n February 11, 1777, a meeting of selectemen was held at the house of Captain Moses Montague, "to prevent monopoly and high prices." - from "In Old South Hadley" by Sophie E. Eastman.

Moses apparently served alongside his cousin, Captain Caleb Montague, in the summer of 1777. This would have been during General Burgoyne's campaign that ended in his defeat at Saratoga. There are indications that Moses and Caleb fought at the Battle of Bennington in August 1777, described below.

Colonel Woodbridge’s regiment was at the Battle of Saratoga in 1777. John, Uriel, and William Montague were all privates in his regiment at the battle, John and William in Captain Samuel Cook’s company, and Uriel in Captain Moses Harvey’s company raised to reinforce the “Northern” army. Peter Montague was in Colonel Ezra May’s regiment, in Captain Oliver Lyman’s company. Moses was not listed as a participant in this battle at the official web site, though "Captain Moses Montague's Company" is repeatedly referenced.

The Battle of Saratoga

Historians consider the Battle of Saratoga to be the major turning point of the American Revolution. This battle proved to the world that the fledgling American army was an effective fighting force capable of defeating the highly trained British forces in a major confrontation. As a result of this successful battle, the European powers, particularly the French, took interest in the cause of the Americans and began to support them.

In the British Campaign of 1777, Major General Burgoyne planned a concentric advance of three columns to meet in Albany, New York. He led the main column, which moved southward along the Hudson River. A second column under General Barry St. Leger served as a diversionary attack, moving eastward from Canada along the Mohawk River. General Howe was expected to direct the third element of the attack. According to the plan, General Henry Clinton, under the direction of Howe, would move northward along the Hudson River and link up with Burgoyne in Albany. Through this campaign, the British hoped to isolate and destroy the Continental forces of New England.

Initially, the British plan appeared to be working, with British victories at Ticonderoga and Hubbardton. Burgoyne's army continually pushed back the Americans southward along the Hudson River with only minor casualties. The Battle of Bennington marked the first significant American victory, when General John Stark led the American militia to victory against a British resupply expedition.

In an attempt to slow the British advance, the American General Philip Schuyler detached 1000 men under the command of Major General Benedict Arnold. This force moved west to thwart St. Leger's eastward advance along the Mohawk River. Arnold returned with his detachment after repelling St. Leger in time serve in the Battle of Saratoga.

At the Battle of Freeman's Farm, the new commander of the Northern Department of the American army, General Horatio Gates, lost an indecisive battle. During this First Battle of Saratoga, fought 19 September 1777, the American forces lost ground to the British forces under General Burgoyne. Disagreements in tactics and personalities led to a heated argument between Generals Gates and Arnold. General Gates relieved Arnold of command as a result. The Battle of Bemis Heights was the second battle of Saratoga, taking place October 7th when Burgoyne desperately attacked rebel defenses with his tired, demoralized army. At Bemis Heights, Gate's defensive tactics insured a tactical victory for the Patriots. However, Arnold saw an opportunity to seize the offensive while Burgoyne was vulnerable and led a counterattack. This bold move so badly wounded the British forces that Burgoyne surrendered days later at Saratoga.


Montague's at Saratoga

Uriel Montague may be Major Richard Montague’s son, born in 1756. I haven’t yet identified the others, but they’re probably members of the extended family.

John Montague. Additional military information: Capt. Moses Montague's co., Col. Israel Chapen's regt.; from 18 Oct to 21 Nov 1779; at Claverack; regiment raised to reinforce Continental Army for 3 months; also, list of men raised to reinforce the Continental Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of 5 Jun 1780, received by Maj. Peter Harwood, of 6th Mass. regt., at Springfield, 3 Jul 1780; age, 19 yrs.; stature, 5 ft. 8 in.; complexion, light; engaged for town of Granby; marched to camp 3 Jul 1780, under command of Lieut. Daniel Frye, of the artificers; passed muster in a return dated Camp Totoway, 25 Oct 1780; discharged 3 Jan 1781.

Uriel Montague. Additional military information: Private, Capt. Reuben Dickenson's co. of Minute-men, Col. R. Woodbridge's regt., marched on alarm of 19 Apr 1775 for 11 days; also, Capt. Reuben Dickinson's co., Col. Woodbridge's regt.; at Charlestown, 27 Jul 1775; from 1 May 1775 for 3 mos. 8 days; also, Sergeant Major, Capt. Elihu Lyman's co., Col. Elisha Porter's (Hampshire Co.) regt.; from 25 Jul to 2 Sep 1779; at New London, Conn.

William Montague. Additional military information: Private, Capt. Eli Parker's co., Col. Leonard's regt.; from 8 May to 16 Jul 1777; company marched from Hampshire Co. 8 May 1777, to reinforce Continental Army at Ticonderoga for 2 months; also, list of men belonging to Capt. Seth Pierce's co., Col. Seth Murray's (Hampshire Co.) regt.; rank, Private; age, 20 yrs.; stature, 5 ft. 7 in.; complexion, light; residence, Sunderland; from 17 Jul 1780; company detached from 6th Hampshire Co. regt. to serve for 3 months from the time of their arrival at Claverack, mustered by Lieut. Col. Samuel Williams and Maj. Whitmore, at Warwick, 4 Aug 1780; also, Private, Capt. Seth Pierce's co., Col. Seth Murray's regt.; from 15 Jul to 10 Oct 1780; regiment raised in Hampshire Co. to reinforce Continental Army for 3 months; roll dated Leverett.

Peter Montague.

Moses was commissioned on 28 May 1778 as Captain of the 2nd Company of Colonel Elisha Porter's 4th Hampshire county regiment of Massachusetts militia. I don't know why he was called up. There was a small battle at Fall River on 25 May 1778 in which the local militia repulsed a British amphibious raide. That may have spurred this call-up.

Captain Montague was commanding his company from Hampshire in the summer and autumn of 1779 on service at New London, Connecticut. His company was in Colonel Israel Chapen's regiment. In July 1779 the British had raided New Haven, and burnt the towns of Fairfield and Norwalk. Moses' force was probably moved south in response. More famously, on 6 September 1781 a British force under the command of the traitor Benedict Arnold raided New London, burning and looting the port.

He also served in the Second Hampshire County Regiment commanded by Colonel Israel Chapin from 13 October to 21 November 1779. In this regiment he saw service of 1 month and 16 days, at Claverack, including 6 days (120 miles) travel home. The regiment was raised to reinforce the Continental Army for 3 months. Note, I've also seen this referred to as "a northern expedition of the Second Hampshire Regiment to reinforce the Continental Army," but where and for what reason?

"Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army" lists "Montague, Moses (Mass). Captain Massachusetts Militia, 1779-1780 (Died 1792.)." Moses died on 18 December 1792 in South Hadley. His tombstone reads,

"In Memory of
Capt. Moses
Montague
who died Dec. 18th
1792
aged 62 years

Sarah Graves Montague died on 17 October 1810 in South Hadley. Moses' children were,
(21) Penelope Montague, b. 16 July 1749, d. 19 March 1821
(21) Peter Montague (1751)
(21) Sarah Montague, b. 4 March 1754, d. 27 January 1796
(21) Moses Montague (1756)
(21) Irene Montague, b. 29 August 1758, d. 16 April 1842
(21) Selah Montague (1761)
(21) Seth Montague (1763)
(21) Mary Montague, b. 14 September 1765, m. Jonathan Sykes 22 January 1789, d. 8 November 1803
(21) Lucinda Montague, b. 25 April 1768, d. 23 August 1850
(21) Elijah Montague (1771)

(21) Peter Montague (1751)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724)

Anita's G-G-G-G-Grandfather and the eldest son of Moses Montague and Sarah Graves, he was born on 18 November 1751 in South Hadley, Hampshire county, Massachusetts.

Peter married Mary Smith on 24 February 1778 in Hadley. She was born on 21 July 1754 in Hadley, the daughter of Deacon David Smith and Hannah Willard. After his marriage he moved his family to Westhampton, a village some miles to the west, on the other side of the Connecticut river.

"In 1777 and 1778 the new settlers were Peter Montague, Noah and Timothy Edwards, . . ." - from "Memorial of the Reunion of the Natives of Westhampton, Mass., September 5, 1866"
Hadley, South Hadley, Sunderland, Montague and Westhampton are all small towns in western Massachusetts, probably within a day’s ride of each other.

Didn't he serve during the Revolution?

The first Federal census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts in 1790 records a Peter Montague with two sons below the age of 16 and 5 women living in his home. One of those sons was David, aged 4, on which all the authorities agree. I believe the other son was Zenas, aged 12, Anita's forebear. I don't think Zenas has been well recorded because he left home early, moving on to Vermont, and died early in New York.

The Town of Westhampton

Life in Westhampton was based on agriculture and one had to provide for food and clothing. Most of the early residents kept sheep, as a source of not only meat, but wool to use for clothing. The land was thickly forested and needed to be cleared for agriculture.

Life at this time was very simple. Often families would have bread and milk for a single meal and sometimes a dessert known as "Hasty Pudding." This was a pudding of apple, molasses, warm cider and toasted bread. The main meal was served at noon. A common meal of the day might be a "New England Boiled Dinner." This consisted of boiled corned beef or pork, potatoes, carrots, cabbage and whatever else they may have had handy in the root cellar. Cider was kept in the cellars and often was served.

All settlers farmed in order to provide for their needs. They owned horses, pigs, chicken and sheep. Among the various crops raised to feed these animals were: corn, rye, wheat, hay and oats. Milk, meat, potatoes, maple syrup, apples, cider and corn were staples of the day.

Maple syrup making was the first industry ever recorded in Westhampton. The area was rich in deciduous forest and used as a source for lumber. Prior to its incorporation as a town, men would travel from Northampton to saw lumber. This area became known as "the woodlot of Northampton." Later, chestnut trees proliferated and were highly sought after but were wiped out in 1918 by a blight. The following is from a list of some of the earlier industries in Westhampton:

Charcoal Making - manufactured by Peter Montague.

In the 1800 census of Westhampton is Peter Montague. In his household are 1 boy under 10, name unknown, and one 10 to 15 years old, David, and one man 45 and over. Peter was 49 at the time. Women in the house included 1 girl 10 to 15, 1 16 to 25 and woman 45 and over. Zenas, 22, had already left home and was living in Vermont.

"Mary Montague wife of Peter Montague died Sept 3d 1815" - Westhampton Births, Marriages and Deaths. "He married (second) in 1817 Lucina Preston." - from "Western Massachusetts: A History" 1926.

In the 1820 census of Westhampton is Peter Montague. In Peter Jr.'s household were 1 boy 10 to 16, name unknwon, and a man 45 and over. Women included 1 girl 16 to 26 and a woman 45 and over. His son, David, lived next door.

On 24 September 1822 Peter Montague died in Westhampton. There was a tombstone in the Westhampton grave yard with an inscription,

"In Memory of
Mr. Peter Montague,
who died Sept. 24 1822, aged 71 yrs."










































Montagues continue to live in Westhampton. A Peter Montague is the Fire Chief of Westhampton today and an environmental activist.

Peter's children were,
(22) Zenas Montague (1778)
(22) Cynthia Montague b. 16 MAR 1781 Westhampton, Mass., d. MAY 1791
(22) Patty Montague (1783)
(22) Mary Montague, b. 22 OCT 1785 Westhampton, Mass, died 22 April 1853 in Brookline, New Yorrk. Martha Lightner wrote,

Mary Montague above born Oct 22 1785 Westhampton, Mass married Luke Phelps and one of their children is Zenas Montague Phelps born in 1811. He does not belong to Theodosia Montague who married a John Phelps as per your website."

Zenas Montague Phelps was born in Westhampton, Massachusetts on 19 July 1811, just a year after the death of his uncle, Zenas Montague, and probably named in his memory. Biographical information includes: "W.C. [probably Wagner college of NYC] '39; U.T.S. [Union Theological Seminary in NYC], '39-'41; Tea [?], Sing Sing, N.Y. -- Tea, Riverdale, N.Y., -- Died, '72." - from the "General Catalogue of Union Theological Seminary in the City of New-York. 1836-1876."


(22) David Montague (1788)
(22) Doctor Calvin Montague, b. 17 December 1791 Westhampton, Mass., d. 9 FEB 1873 Westhampton, Mass
(22) Cynthia Montague, b. 12 May 1796

(22) Zenas Montague (1778)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751)

Anita's G-G-G-Grandfather. His line of the family has, today, ended in all female heirs. According to a record of births and christenings, 1775-1795, for Westhampton, Massachusetts, taken by the LDS church, a Zenas Montague was born in 1778 to Peter and Mary Montague.

"Zenas Montague son to Mr. Peter Montague and Mary his wife was born December 12th A1778" - Westhampton Births, Marriages and Deaths
Zenas Montague, the son of Peter Montague and Mary, was born on 12 December 1778 in Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts - from "History and Genealogy of the Montague Family of America." That's nine and a half months after Peter Montague married Mary Smith on 24 February 1778.

I've recently found another source that agrees with this theory:

"Descendant of Capt. Moses Montague, as follows [in backwards order]:
1. Owen H. Montague (b. 1838) m. 1871 Cornelius J. Tracy (1843-1919).
2. Peter R. Montague (1800-96) m. 1835 Olive F. Hall (1815-91).
3. Zenas Montague (1778-1810) m. Abigail Owen (1781-1840).
4. Peter Montague (1751-1822) m. 1778 Mary Smith (1754-1815).
6. Moses Montague m. 1748 Sarah Graves (1726-1810)."
- from the "Lineage Book" complied by Mae Jones for the Daughters of the American Revolution

Zenas

From the New Testament of the Bible, a teacher of the Jewish law and afterwards a Christian [Titus 3:13]. From the Greek, meaning Jupiter. Pronounced dzay-nas'.

A possible explanation of his unusual given name, and another check on the authenticity of this citing, is the existence of a Zenas Graves in the Sarah Graves family. Sarah would be Zenas' grandmother. Toby Williams writes,

"Was reading your very interesting website, and I found the references to Zenas Graves very interesting.

For what it is worth, as far as I can tell, Zenas Graves appears to have left the Sunderland/Montague area around 1780 or so, apparently going up towards Troy, NY, and probably over into Rutland County, Vermont for a while, before going up Lake Champlain, and over to Jay, NY, where he appears to have been by 1798. It appears that Zenas' family left Jay sometime around 1811 - he is on the 1810 Essex County census, mistranscribed as Times Graves. It appears that they went west through New York state, ultimately going down the Ohio River to Cincinnatti, and then over to Deraborn County, Indiana, where he is reportedly buried in what is now called Pella Cemetery.

Zenas' son, William Graves, married Mirium Howe in Wells, Vermont in 1806.

Interestingly, Zenas's first wife was named Hannah - last name unknown, although I strongly suspect it was Harvey. His second wife is almost certainly Abigail Ward, daughter of Asahel Ward and Esther Franklin. Zenas probably married Abigail Ward in Addison County, Vermont, near Chimney Point, 10 miles north or Orwell.

The extended Graves family were fairly numerous in 18th century Massachusetts, and there were a large number of them in the Sunderland/Montague area.

Thus, your Zenas Montague that died in Rutland may have been the first son of Zenas Montague, although this would have meant that he would have had to have married immediately after the 1800 census.

Anyway, very interesting research you have done."

The Graves family

See also Thomas Graves for a more complete descent of this family in America. Thomas Graves was born in 1585 in England, possibly in Kent. Two of Thomas’ sons are of interest. Their descents are as follows:

(1) John Graves (1622)
(2) Daniel Graves (1664)
(3) John Graves (1707)

John came to Sunderland, Massachusetts from Westfield, where he married Mary Bush on 16 December 1729. He probably returned to Westfield in two or three years. The town granted him a home lot 20 rods wide on the East side above Samuel Scott in 1730, but he did not remain long enough to fulfill the conditions of the grant. They had two sons named Zenas, the first dying young:

(4) Zenas Graves (1738)
(4) Zenas Graves (1752)

The descent of Thomas Graves second son was as follows:

(1) Isaac Graves (1620)
(2) John Graves (1664)
(3) Benjamin Graves (1689)

Benjamin married Mary Warner, daughter of Jacob Warner and Elizabeth Goodman, on 7 April 1720. Their daughter was:

(4) Sarah Graves

Sarah was the wife of Moses Montague, Zenas Montague’s grandfather. Zenas Graves, above, would have been her nephew, twice removed (?). Because the name is so rare, I propose that Sarah’s son, Peter, named his son in honor of this kinsman. Depending on how close the family’s were, Zenas Graves and Peter Montague, born within a year of each other, could have been close friends.

Sometime before 1800 Zenas moved north from Massachusetts into Vermont. In the 1800 census of Rutland township, Rutland county, Vermont there was Zenas Montague, a single man between 16 and 25 years old, living alone. He would have been 22 at the time. Rutland is on the western slope of the Green Mountains, a little less than half way up the state. Unfortunately, I've recently found the following in the records of the Congregational Church of Ruthland, Vermont,

Zenas Montague April 1801 Died
So perhaps the Zenas in the 1800 census was not our man. However, we soon thereafter find our Zenas in Orwell, Vermont, which is in Rutland county, only about 15 miles north of the town of Rutland. Perhaps we can assume, as the message above does, that Zenas Montague married soon after the 1800 census and had a son, Zenas Jr., who is the person who died in April 1801. We would also have to assume that the mother died at about the same time.

Zenas married Abigail Owen in about 1802. She was born in Windham, Connecticutt on 16 January 1782 per "Descendants of John Owen of Windsor, Connecticut" or 12 October 1781 per the "History and Genealogy of the Montague Family of America." She was the daughter of Frederick Owen and Margaret Hibbard. - from "Descendants of John Owen of Windsor, Connecticut (1622-1699) : a genealogy," or per the "History of Chautauqua County, New York":

Owen, Montague; Abigail Owen b 12 Oct 1781; d 12 Oct 1840; m Zenas Montague b 12 Dec 1778; d 22 Sep 1810 NY.
- from Northern Owens 1500-1800, an Owens family website
She married Zenas in Orwell, Vermont.

Their first child, a daughter, Cynthia, was born on 22 September 1803 in Orwell.

Zenas settled for a time in Orwell, where his son David Owen Montague was born in July 1805. Orwell is about 15 miles northwest of Rutland. Zenas was 27 years old at the time. By 1809 he had moved further north, settling in Bridport, Vermont, where his second son, Peter Ross Montague was born. Both of these towns are near Lake Champlain, which is to the west.

In the 1810 census of Bridport, Addison county, Vermont as Zenas Montague. In the household there were two sons, 0-10 years old, Peter Ross, 4, and David Owen, 5, and one, presumably Zenas Montague, aged 26-45, he was 32 at the time. There were also two daughters, 0-10 years old, and another woman, presumably Abigail Owens Montague, aged 26-45, she would have been 29.

Zenas couldn't seem to live for long in any one place. The year after Peter's birth, sometime in 1810, he was in Syracuse, Onondaga county, New York, where he died, at the age of 32, on 22 September 1810.

"Zenas Montague named above died Sept 22 1810" - Westhampton Births, Marriages and Deaths
There is no indication what the cause of his death may have been. I haven't found his tombstone; he was probably buried in an unmarked grave. Zenas' son, David, wrote the following,
"David O. Montague of Davenport, Io., said, "My father's name was Zenas Montague of Vermont. He died in September 1810. The following winter my grandfather came up, and brought me and my elder sister to West Hampton, and that was my home until he died. At the age of twenty-one I went West, and have been there since, with the exception of my return to West Hampton nineteen years ago this fall. While there, at the home of uncle David Montague living in the centre of the town, cousin Henry Montague accompanied me to my old home,--the house and home of my grandfather Peter (which I understnad is now nearly all torn down); and I have been requested to repeat some verses which I composed on my ramble out there in September, 1863 . . " - from "Pamphlets on Biography" volume 19

By 1812 his widow, Abigail, with son Peter, had moved to Middleburry, in Genesee county, New York. There she married for a second time, to Ezra Bisby [Bisbee, Bisbey], though at what date is uncertain [probably about 1812]. I do not see either Ezra or the Montagues in the 1820 census.

Peter R. Montague, Zenas' second son, is on record as coming to Mina, in Chautauqua county, New York at the age of 15, with his stepfather, Ezra Bisby, in April 1824. Cinthia and David Owen had been brought back to Westhampton at the time of their father's death by their grandfather, Peter.

Mina, New York

A small town in the extreme west of New York state, in Chautauqua county, near Lake Erie.

In the 1830 census of Mina, Chautauqua county, New York as Ezra Bisby, the step-father. In the household were one man, 20 to 30 years old, Peter Ross Montague, and another 60 to 70 years old, Ezra I suppose. David Owen had by this time moved to Mina, but was married and living on his own. Of the women, there was one 10 to 15, one 15 to 20, and a third who was 40 to 50, this was probably Abigail who would have been 49.

In the 1840 census of Mina as Ezra Bisby, a man 60 to 70. Living with him was a woman 50 to 60 years old, Abigail. I suspect that Ezra was about 10 years older than Abigail. In the 1830 census he was at the younger end of the spectrum and in 1840 at the upper end.

Abigail died on 12 October 1840 in Mina, Chautauqua county, New York. Zenas' children were,
(23) Cinthia Montague (1803)
(23) David Owen Montague (1805)
(23) Emily Montague (1807)
(23) Peter Ross Montague (1809)
plus two daughters, names unknown.



(23) Cinthia Montague (1803)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778)

Or Cynthia. She was born on 22 September 1803 in Orwell, Vermont. After her father's death in 1810 she and her brother, David Owen, returned to Westhampton, Massachusetts, brought there by her grandfather, Peter Montague. She was later adopted by her uncle, (22) David Montague (1788), of Westhampton, Zenas' younger brother.

She married Roland [Rowland] Strong, a farmer at Westhampton, on 30 November 1826. Rowland was born on 28 June 1801 in Westhampton, the eldest son of Amasa Strong and Rhoda Bartlett.

"Rowland Strong, b. June 28, 1801, m. Nov. 30, 1826, Cynthia Montague b. Sept. 22, 1803 in Orwell, Vt. (dau. of Zenas Montague, and adopted dau. of David Montague of Westhampton, Mass.): a farmer at Westhampton, and after 1830, at Huntsburgh, O., where he d. Aug. 10, 1805, 1865: she d. Nov. 11, 1861.
[7th Generation] Children:
Zenas Montague Strong b. July 19, 1828, at Westhampton . . ." - from "The History of the Descendants of Elder John Strong"

Cynthia and Rowland moved to Hutsburgh, Ohio, where he died on 10 August 1865 and she on 11 November 1861.

They had two sons, Zenas Montague Strong, born on 19 July 1828 in Westhampton, and Edwin Lyman Strong. - from "Descendants of John Owen of Windsor, Connecticut" and "newenglandgenealogy.pcplayground.com."

Cynthia's eldest son, Zenas Montague Strong, went on to marry Martha Jane Austin on 14 January 1855.

(23) David Owen Montague (1805)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778)

Anita's G-G-Grandfather, the eldest son of Zenas Montague. All the descending lines of David's family end in females, the Montague name dying out. He was born in Orwell, Vermont on 31 July 1805. I suspect his middle name was in honor of his mother's family, the Owens. I have another source that shows a David Owen Montague who was born on 31 July 1805, but this time listed as in Westhampton, Massachusetts. This is probably an error, a supposition based on his father’s birth there and David's return to this town after his father's death.

Orwell, Vermont

A small village in northwestern Vermont, a little less than halfway up the state’s western border.

Soon after David's birth the family moved further north, to Bridport, Vermont where his brother, Peter Ross, was born in 1809. The family moved immediately thereafter, settling in Syracuse, New York, where David's father, Zenas, died in 1810. David was only 5 years old at the time.

David's mother married Ezra Bisby and she and his younger brother, Peter, moved, in 1824, to Mina, Chatauqua county, in western New York.

David and his older sister, Cinthia, moved back to Westhampton, Massachusetts.

"David O. Montague of Davenport, Io. said, "My father's name was Zenas Montague of Vermont. He died in September, 1810. The following winter my grandfather [Peter] came up, and brought me and my elder sister to West Hampton, and that was my home until he died. At the age of twenty-one [1826] I went West [to Mina, New York], and have been there since, with the exception of my return to West Hampton nineteen years ago this fall. While there, at the home of uncle David Montague living in the centre of the town, cousin Henry Montague accompanied me to my old home,--the house and home of my grandfather Peter (which I understand is now nearly all torn down); and I have been requested to repeat some verses which I composed on my ramble out there in September, 1863."

"Mr. Montague repeated some interesting lines of considerable length, which lack of space and copy prevents our inserting. [I bet]" - from "Meeting of the Montague Family at Hadley, Mass., Aug. 2, 1882" by Richard Montague, page 65
"A printed copy of "Poetical Reflections of a Ramble from Westhampton Centre to the Old House and Home of Boyhood Days," by David Owen Montague (born Orwell, Vt., July 31, 1805), and dated Davenport, Io., Sept. 15, 1882, was received too late for insertion in previous pages. For a copy, address as above." - from "Meeting of the Montague Family at Hadley, Mass., Aug. 2, 1882" by Richard Montague, page 105
At some point after his grandfather's death, in 1822, David moved west, rejoining his mother in western New York.

David married Lucy Lee Hill on 3 June 1829 [1827 per "Descendants of John Owen of Windsor, Connecticut"] in Mina, Chautauqua county, New York. She was born in Middlebury, New York on 23 July 1809. She was first cousin of Zera Colburn, the great arithmetical prodigy [never heard of her] - from "History and Genealogy of the Montague Family of America." A relative of hers wrote to me recently.

"Hello Mr. Hissem,

Just had to write and tell you how much I’ve enjoyed your research! Your work in putting together all that family information is superb. I had to write and say so - Congratulations on a job well done!

Particularly enjoyed your write-up on David Owen Montague. His wife Lucy Lee Hill was the sister of my 3rd great-grandmother. I live in Jackson County, Iowa, just nine miles from LaMotte, where the family settled. The Hills are very difficult to trace! Beside Lucy Lee and my 3rd great-grandmother Melinda Hill Belknap, there were also two more sisters Charlotte and Eunice. Their mother Polly Lee Hill is buried in the East Hill Cemetery in LaMotte, but the name of Polly’s husband has escaped us. Current research suggests there may have been a brother or cousin named Truman/Sherman Hill, but that is as yet only conjecture.

Regarding Zenas Montague and his wife Ida Theressa Noble – I believe Ida to have been the daughter of Ande and Abiah Herrick Noble of Chautauqua County, NY. Ande Noble is credited with being one of the first settlers of French Creek in Chautauqua County. He and his wife Abiah ended up in Jackson County, IA, where they are buried in the East Hill Cemetery in LaMotte with two grandchildren. I think they ended up in LaMotte because the Chautauqua County families of Noble, Montague, Hill, and Belknap were related—it’s a long story.

The Nobles did live in Kalamazoo, Michigan for a time, after they left New York. I also have often wondered why Zenas and Ida Montague went all the way back to Michigan to marry. I have yet to discover the connection.

Once again, I’ve enjoyed your research. Best Wishes, Jill T. Davis"

In the 1830 census of Mina as David O. Montague. In the household were one boy 5 to 10 years old, [?], a man 20 to 30, David, a girl under five, [?], and 2 women 20 to 30 years old, probably Lucy and a sister-in-law.

In the 1835 Federal Census of Mina, New York there as David C. [O?] Montague. There were two males in the family and three females. None of the males were subject to militia duty. One male was qualified to vote, meaning that one of them must have been underage. This may be a son we haven't found yet. If so, he died before 1840. There was one married female under 45, Lucy, no unmarried females 16-45, and two unmarried females under the age of 16, Alvira, Harriet. They had twelve acres of improved land that was occupied by the family.

In the 1840 census of Mina, Chataqua county, New York as David O. Montague. In his household were one man 40 to 50 years old, David would have been 45 at the time. Women in the household included 1 girl under 5, Polly, 2 that were 5 to 10, Alvira and Harriet, and a woman 30 to 40 years old, David's wife, Lucy. Zenas was not born until 1841.

David Owen Montague was an early anti-slavery advocate.

"David Owen Montague (1805-1883) was a delegate from the Baptist church of Sherman (Chautauqua County) NY at the 1842 annual meeting of the Harmony Baptist Association, where the following resolution was unanimously adopted: “Resolved, that we look upon Slavery as it exists at the South as a great moral evil, and do most affectionately beseech our brethren, to put away this sin for their own good and the good of the oppressed.”
. . .
Montague also served as the church clerk for the Sherman church and also for the Baptist church of Mina (Chautauqua County) NY. He was a son of Zenas Montague (1778-1810) and Abigail Owen Montague (1781-1840). He was married to Lucy Lee Hill (1809-1893), and their children of record included Alvira Mabel Montague (1831-1904), Harriet Newell Montague (1833-1911), Polly Abigail Montague (1836-1919), Zenas Winthrop Montague (1841-1922), Adoniram Judson Montague (1845-1921), and Leroy Couch Montague (b.1853).

The family was living in Mina at the time of the 1830 and 1840 censuses. However, by 1845 they were residing in LaMotte (Jackson County) IA. The Missionary Magazine of the American Baptist Missionary Union, Vol. 31 (Boston 1851) noted that Montague donated $3.00 to the Baptist Church of LaMotte IA in 1851. In 1843, Montague sold his farm to Henry Babbitt, who may be seen on the 1854 county map in the town of Mina." - from a website titled "1800's Antislavery Activists"

David's son Zenas Winthrop was born in Mina in 1841. Zenas later recalled,

"In the fall of 1838 my father, David Owen Montague, and Joseph Palmer drove from old Chautuaqua county, New York, to Jackson county, Iowa, and walked back in December, the last day walking over fifty miles,and broke the track through the snow over a prairie for twelve miles. Judge Palmer moved out to Jackson county, Iowa, in the spring of '39, but father said it took him four years to sell his little pile of rock, called in that country a farm, and in the spring of 1843, he moved out, driving the three horses, and located at what he afterwards called Lamotte, and bought out a homesteader who had up a pile of logs and twelve acres of the best sod ground in fourteen states and settled down for a home amongst the wolves, and frequent visits from Merill's gang of robbers.

Our log cabin was very fortunate, having been located first in the territory of Michigan, then Wisconsin, then Iowa, and in '46 was welcomed to the State of Iowa, and yet had not been moved during that time. In '46 John E. Goodenow and my father got the stage line and mail route established from Dubuque, through Lamotte, Andrew and Maquoketa to Davenport, being the second mail route in the state, the line on the old military road from Dubuque to Iowa city being the first. If father were living now there is no place he would rather spend the 4th of July than with the old settlers of Maquoketa."

David's second son, A. Judson, was born in Iowa in 1845.

"In regard to Lamotte, I mention D. O. Montague, George Belknap, Merrick and John Chamberlain, as being among the first settlers. D. O. Montague was first postmaster." - from "Annals of Jackson County, Iowa"

In the 1850 census of Prairie Spring township, Jackson county, Iowa as David O. Montague, a 45 year old farmer, born in Vermont, with a personal worth of $1,500. Living with him were his wife, Lucy, 41, also born in Vermont, and children, Alvira, 18, Harriet, 17, Polly, 14, and Zenas, 10, all born in New York. Another son, Judson, was 5 and born in Iowa. Leroy Couch would not be born until 1853.

David O. Montague, postmaster at Lamotte, Jackson county, Iowa - from "The United States Post-Office Guide" by Eli Bowen, 1851. On a similar list of 1856.

In May 1852 David O. Montague, of the Iowa Asso[ciation], was on record as donating $4 to the missionaries - from "The Missionary Magazine." His support of this cause perhaps explains his second son's interesting name. Adoniram Judson was prominently mentioned in the magazine as was his widow. A Bisopu Judson, a son or native?, continued to work with the missionaries in Assam, part of Burma.

In the 1860 census of Richland township, Jackson county, Iowa as D.O. Montague, a 54 year old farmer. He was born in Vermont. Living with him were his wife, Lucy, 50, also born in Vermont, and children, Polly, 24, and Zenas, 19, both born in New York, and Judson, 15, and Leroy, 7, born in Iowa.

In the 1870 census of Lyons City, Clinton county, Iowa as David O. Montague, a 65 year old Colporteus [?], of Vermont. Living with him were his wife, Lucy, 61, also of Vermont, and children, Polly A., 32, of New York, and Leroy C., a 17 year old farm laborer, of Iowa. Clinton county is just south of Jackson county. Lyons City is a small town, now called simply Lyons. on the Mississippi river. Below is a panoramic view of the town.

In the 1880 census of Davenport, Scott county, Iowa David Montgue and his wife were living with his second son, Judson. Davenport is in Scott county, on the Mississippi river, just south of Clinton county. His occupation was listed as Real Estate & Fire Insurance. His parents were listed as coming from Vermont.

At a family reunion in 1882 a registry was made of the descendents of Richard Montague of Hadley, Massachusetts. The Iowa family members included:

David O. Montague Davenport, Iowa
. . .
A. Judson Montague Davenport, Iowa
. . .
Jessie Montague Davenport, Iowa
Roy R. Montague (1871) Davenport, Iowa
Carrie M. Montague (1874) Davenport, Iowa
Guy Judson Montague Lyons, Iowa
Zenas W. Montague La Motte, Iowa
Leroy C. Montague Lyons, Iowa
Elvira M. Montague Salisbury La Grand, Iowa
Abbie Montague Stebbins Lyons, Iowa
- from "Meething of the Montague Family of Hadley, Mass., Aug. 2, 1882"
A note in the reference above read, "Note 44.-Page 66. A printed copy of "Poetical Reflections of a Ramble from Westhampton Centre to the Old House and Home of Boyhood Days," by David Owen Montague (born Orwell, Vt., July 31, 1805), and dated Davenport, Io., Sept. 15, 1883, was received too late for insertion in previoous pages."

David died in Davenport on 14 September 1883 after a painful illness. He was buried in the Oakdale cemetary of Davenport, near where his son, Judson, was later buried.

David's chidren were,
(24) Alvira [Elvira] Mabel Montague 1831)
(24) Harriet Newell Montague (1833)
(24) Polly Abigail Montague (1836)
(24) Zenas Winthrop Montague (1841)
(24) Adoniram Judson Montague (1845)
(24) Leroy Couch Montague (1853)

(24) Alvira [Elvira] Mabel Montague (1831)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805)

She was born on 17 April 1831 in Mina, New York. In the 1850 census of Prairie Spring township, Jackson county, Iowa as Alvira Montague, 18, born in New York.

She married James M[onroe?] Salisbury, a wagon maker, the son of Calvin C. Salisbury and Sarah Stroud. He was born on 4 October 1832. He served as a Private in the 9th Iowa infantry during the Civil War. After the war they settled in Le Grand, Marshall county, Iowa where they lived for many years. Alvira died on 17 January 1904. James soon followed her, and died on 28 November 1904. Both were buried in the Pleasant Hill cemetary in Le Grand, Marshall county, Iowa.

(24) Harriet Newell Montague (1833)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805)

She was born on 28 July 1833 in Mina, New York. In the 1850 census of Prairie Spring township, Jackson county, Iowa as Harriet Montague, 17, born in New York.

She married Caleb Burlison McDowell, a blacksmith, on 18 March 1852 in LaMotte, Jackson county, Iowa. He was born on 3 July 1831 in Freetown, Cortland county, New York, the son of George Washington McDowell and Irene Dodge. Harriet and Caleb were living in Lyons, Clinton county, Iowa at the time of the 1880 census. Caleb died on 30 September 1900 in Los Angeles, California. Harriet followed him on 30 November 1911.

(24) Polly Abigail Montague (1836)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805)

She was born on 2 March 2 1836 in Mina, New York. Her middle name appears to be in honor of her grandmother, Abigail Owen. In the 1850 census of Prairie Spring township, Jackson county, Iowa as Polly Montague, 14, born in New York. In the 1860 census of Richland township, Jackson county, Iowa as Polly Montague, 24, born in New York. In the 1870 census of Lyons City, Clinton county, Iowa as Polly A. Montague, 32, of New York. She was still living at home.

She married S. H. Stebbins and continued to live in Iowa. - from "Descendants of John Owen of Windsor, Connecticut."

(24) Zenas Winthrop Montague (1841)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805)

He was born on 25 April 1841 in Mina, Chautauqua county, New York, the eldest of David's three sons. Note that he was named after his grandfather. In the 1850 census of Prairie Spring township, Jackson county, Iowa as Zenas Montague, 10, born in New York. In the 1860 census of Richland township, Jackson county, Iowa as Zenas Montague, 19, born in New York.

He doesn't appear to have served in the Civil War, but note that Iowa had many volunteers for service and only once resorted to a draft.

Residence: Prairie Springs, Jackson county, Iowa. Name: Montague, Zenas. Age: 22. White or Colored: White. Profession: Teacher. Married or Unmarried: Single. Place of Birth: New York. - Civil War Draft Registrations Records, 1863-1865
The following explains the issue with Zenas' service.
"At the time of the late war he [Zenas Winthrop Montague] aided in organizing a company, and was offered the first lieutenancy, and afterward assistant quartermaster, but his health would not admit of the duties of either. Educated at Monroe, Ill. Engaged in mercantile business at Lyons, Iowa ; was also Mayor of La Motte, Iowa." - from "History and Genealogy of the Montague Family of America" by George Wm. Montague

Zenas W. Montague, of Lamotte, Iowa, 23, married Ida T. [Theressa Louisa] Noble, of Lamotte, Iowa, 18 [1845], on 17 May 1863 in Detroit, Wayne county, Michigan. One of the witnesses was N. H. Noble, of Lamotte. The latter was probably her brother, Nathaniel Herrick Noble. The Reverend Supply Chase officiated at the wedding. I don't know why the marriage took place in Detroit.

I see Ida Noble, 16, of Ohio, in the 1860 census of Prairie Springs, Jackson county, Iowa. Her parents were Andrew W. Noble, 70, of Connecticut, and Abiah [Herrick], 60, of Vermont. There are some siblings in their late twenties listed as well, including Nathaniel H. Noble, 25, of New York. Note that the Noble family, according to Jill T. Davis, above, were "one of the first settlers of French Creek in Chautauqua county," New York, near where the Montagues had lived. They moved to Ohio in 1843, then to Michigan, where they resided between 1846 and 1858, when they moved to Jackson county, Iowa - from the obituary of one of Ida's sisters. Andrew W. Noble, who died on 6 February 1869, Abiah Herrick Noble, who died on 10 April 1867, and N. Herrick Noble, who died on 5 December 1868, were buried in the East Hill cemetery in Lamotte. By the way, Abiah's father was Nathaniel Herrick, thus her son's name.

In the 1870 census of Prairie Springs, Jackson county as Zenas Montague [Gonas Mentagne in Ancestry.com], a 29 year old Life Insurance agent, of New York. Living with him were his wife, Ida, 25, and daughter, Ida, 4/12.

In 1879 Zenas was mayor of Lamotte.

"Z. MONTAGUE WAS THE FIRST LA MOTTE MAYOR

Narrow Gauge Road, Churches, Fires, Make Town's History

LaMotte, a town of 325 citizens, is located 20 miles north of Maquoketa on the gravel road which was known as the old Davenport-Dubuque post road. The land was purchased from the government in 1847 at $1.25 an acre by Owen Montague, who before his death, willed the park site located in the center of the town for recreational purposes and the grounds for a public school building.

About the same time that the land was purchased, David Montague and John E. Goodenow established a mail route from Davenport, through Maquoketa, Andrew, LaMotte, to Dubuque, one of the earliest mail routes in the state. Mr. Montague named the town after Alexander LaMotte, who was born in Paris in 1818 and died in 1871. Mr. LaMotte was buried in a cemetery ten miles southwest of Maquoketa, and his only living son, LaFayette, now resides in Brighton, Iowa.

Z. Montague was named first Postmaster.

With the coming of this road LaMotte became a community and business center. However, the town site was not surveyed until 1873, incorporation following six years later, in March, 1879. Z. Montague was the first mayor.

Also in 1879 came an event which made LaMotte a business center-the narrow gauge railroad, a branch of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul system, was built through the town to Zwingle and then later on to Cascade. This gave the town connection with the main line running through Bellevue, and also with the Mississippi river traffic. The narrow gauge operated until 1933 when it was replaced by a gas rail locomotive. Two years later the track and equipment were sold and since that time the town has depended upon trucking service." - from the "Jackson Sentinel Centennial Issue"

In the 1880 census of La Motte, Jackson county, Iowa as Z.W. Montague, a 39 year old stock dealer. His father was listed as being from Massachusetts [sic]. Living with him were his wife, Ida T. Montague, 35, and children, Lela, 10, Cora, 7, and Helen, 4. For Ida it mentions her occupation as the usual, keeping house, but also mentions, under the heading of "Is the person sick . . . If so, what is the sickness or disability?," it mentions confinement. Was she expecting another child or just very sick?

Last Name(s) First Name(s) Occupation or Business
Montague Z W live stock
- from the "La Motte, Jackson Co., Iowa, 1882 Business Directory."

It is not entirely clear what the followig snippet means, but apparently Z.W. bred American Trotting horses.

"Bred by ZW Montague, Lamotte, Iowa; passed through the hands of Judge Hayes, Clinton, Iowa, 8, A. Browne >t Co. , Kalamazoo, Mich. ; owned by M. . ." - from "Wallace's American Trotting Register"

In the 1885 state census of Richland, Jackson county, Iowa as Zenas Winthrop Montague, a 43 year old "Mayor [?] and Dealer in Stock [Insurance?]." Living with him were his wife, Ida L. T. Montague, 40, and daughters, Lela Abiah, 14, Cora Sally, 12, and Helen Marie, 9.

"This record discloses the following facts: ZW Montague, a justice of the peace of Jones county, upon an information filed charging defendant with the commission of a crime in Dubuque county, Iowa, and within 500 yards of the boundary of Jone county, Iowa, did, on July 31, 1893, issued a warrant for the defendent's arrest, . . ." - from "Reports of Cases at Law and in Equity Determined by the Supreme Court of the State of Iowa", 1897

Zenas held a number of official positions.

"Official Roster, Madison Township
. . .
1897 . . . Justices: S.L. Gilbert, G.W. Evans, Z.W. Montague:
. . .
Official Roster, Center Junction
. . .
1886 Assessor Z.W. Montague
1887 Assessor Z.W. Montague
1888 Recorder Z.W. Montague
. . .
1891-1893, 1896-1897 Mayor Z.W. Montague" - from the "History of Jones County, Iowa" by S.J. Clarke Publishing Company, pg 418
Center Junction is in the northern part of Madison township and began its existence in October 1871.

A reference, "History of Jackson County, Iowa," claims that "The postoffice [of Lamotte] was conducted first by Z.W. Montague;" however that ignores the service of Zenas' father in 1851 to 1856. Z.W. Montague was assessor [of Lamotte] in 1886 and 1887; recorder in 1888; the mayor in 1891, 1892, 1893, 1896 and 1897. - from "History of Jones County, Iowa: Past and Present" by Robert McCalin Corbit.

The following may illustrate what Zenas was doing as a stock dealer, in this case a dealer in hogs. The quoted paragraph is from an article about the rise of the livestock commission merchant, by K.C. Olson. These merchants were agents who arranged the sale of livestock for a commission fee. The article is mainly concerned with the Kansas City stockyards.

"A hog trader named Z. W. Montague in a letter to Drovers Journal (August 12, 1884) poignantly illustrated the graft inherent in the dockage system. Montague’s commission agent sold his hogs early one morning but the hogs were not weighed and docked until late afternoon. During that day, the price of hogs declined 25¢/hundred-weight. Observing this price trend, the packer buyer warned the commission agent that Montague would have to take a big weight dock before payment was rendered. To make his actions less obvious to others in the stockyard, the packer buyer rushed the load of hogs out of the pen six or eight abreast and identified aloud each hog he viewed as imperfect. Montague was astonished at the number of dockages applied by the packer buyer. In his opinion, there was only one dockable hog in the lot but the packer buyer managed to reduce the price of that lot of hogs exactly 25¢/hundredweight from the high morning price to the low afternoon price."

Zenas moved his family to Center Junction, in Jones county, which is due west of La Motte. From the "Plat Book of Jones County, Iowa," Patron's Directory, 1893:

Madison
Name: Montague, Z. W.
Business: Real Estate, Insurance, Notary Public, and Justice of the Peace. Breeder Imported "Black Langshans," Felch and Autocrat Strains of "Light Brahmas" and S. C. W. Leghorns [these are types of chickens]
Post Office: Centre Junction
Section: 4

Jones County, Iowa

The county is in east central Iowa, due west of Jackson and Clinton counties. The county seat is Anamosa. The following, rather florid, description of the counties topography is taken from A. T. Andreas' "Illustrated Historical Atlas of Iowa."

"The surface of the country in this county is rolling, not in waves, but thrown into heaps and low conical hills, the valleys winding in every direction, with considerable timber along the water courses, and here and there groves of oak, maple, walnut, ash, and cottonwood on the prairies. The soil is fertile and produces wheat, corn, oats and potatoes abundantly, the climate salubrious, and the whole county well watered by the Maquoketa and Wapsipinicon Rivers, which run in a southeasterly direction, and are fed by numerous tributaries. Flourishing orchards of apples, cherries, wild plums and small fruit are rapidly growing in all parts of the county. The chief employment is grain and cattle raising and the dairy business. There are several cheese factories in the northern part, and some fine horses and blooded stock are exported from this county."

In the 1895 state census of Center Junction, Jones county, Iowa as Zenas Montague [sometimes mistranscribed as Jonas], 53, born in New York. Living with him were his wife, Ida, 50, and daughters Lela, 24, Cora, 22, and Helen, 19. It appears that Ida's confinement did not result in another child.

After 1895 Zenas made another move west, settling in Vinton, Iowa. In the 1900 census of Vinton City, Benton county, Iowa as Z. W. Montague, a 59 year old farmer, born in New York state, then residing on Hamilton street. Oddly, today all the streets in Vinton are designated by numerals. Both of his parents were from Vermont. Living with him were his wife, Ida, 56, and daughters Lela, 30, Cora, a 27 year old school teacher, and Helen, a 24 year old stenographer. The census indicated that Ida had 5 children, 3 of which were still living.

Benton County, Iowa

Benton county is two counties due west of Jones county. Vinton is the county seat and located on the south bank of the Cedar river.

In 1904 Zenas Winthrop provided a history of his family's movements.

"Letter from an Old Pioneer.

Cedar Falls, June 21, 1904.
Mr. W. C. Gregory, Maquoketa, Iowa.

Dear Sir and Brother . . . As I came to Jackson county, Iowa, sixty-one years ago this last month (June, 1843), and have made Iowa my home ever since, perhaps I am entitled to membership [in the Pioneer Society] . . . ; but since getting crippled up in a runaway in February, 1901, have not been so far away from home and two years ago moved here, and we are keeping roomers from the state normal.

In the fall of 1838 my father, David Owen Montague, and Joseph Palmer drove from old Chautuaqua county, New York, to Jackson county, Iowa, and walked back in December, the last day walking over fifty miles,and broke the track through the snow over a prairie for twelve miles. Judge Palmer moved out to Jackson county, Iowa, in the spring of '39, but father said it took him four years to sell his little pile of rock, called in that country a farm, and in the spring of 1843, he moved out, driving the three horses, and located at what he afterwards called Lamotte, and bought out a homesteader who had up a pile of logs and twelve acres of the best sod ground in fourteen states and settled down for a home amongst the wolves, and frequent visits from Merill's gang of robbers.

Our log cabin was very fortunate, having been located first in the territory of Michigan, then Wisconsin, then Iowa, and in '46 was welcomed to the State of Iowa, and yet had not been moved during that time. In '46 John E. Goodenow and my father got the stage line and mail route established from Dubuque, through Lamotte, Andrew and Maquoketa to Davenport, being the second mail route in the state, the line on the old military road from Dubuque to Iowa city being the first. If father were living now there is no place he would rather spend the 4th of July than with the old settlers of Maquoketa. It is time for the mail man. Best regards to all.

Respectfully, your friend,
ZW MONTAGUE." - from the "History of Jackson County, Iowa"

In 1908 Zenas took a trip.

"Zenas Montague and Mr. and Mrs. Homer Curtiss left today for a trip to northeastern New Mexico, in the vicinity of Springer and Los Vegas [sic], to look over the country with a view to locating there if the country suits them. They expect to be gone about ten days." - from the Cedar Falls Gazette of 16 June 1908
Apparently the country suited him.

Zenas moved to the New Mexico territory. In the 1910 census of Las Vegas, San Miguel county, New Mexico territory as Zenas W. Montague, a 68 year old real estate agent, born in New York. Had his father, David, and younger brother, Judson, finally gotten him into the real estate market? Living with him were his wife, Ida T., 65, and daughters, Cora, 36, and Helen, 34. The census correctly shows his father as born in Vermont. What the heck was Zenas doing in New Mexico? The early prosperity of Las Vegas had peaked and by 1910 the town was on the route to becoming a quaint tourist attraction. If Zenas had meant to cash in on real estate he would have been too late. An alternative explanation may be that he was one of the first snow-birds, retirees who head for the sun-belt.

For an exhaustive and entertaining look at Zenas' time in Las Vegas, see Zenas and Ida Noble Montague in Las Vegas, New Mexico, by Suzanne Liles.

Las Vegas, New Mexico

Las Vegas is located about fifty miles east of Santa Fe, high in the Sangre de Cristo mountains at an elevation of 6,470 feet. The Gallinas river runs through the center of town. Traditionally it was a community based on agriculture, farming and ranching. It is still a small town of only 15,000 inhabitants, over eighty percent of whom are Hispanic.

The original settlement, Nuestra Señora de los Dolores de Las Vegas (Our Lady of Sorrows of the Meadows), dates from 1835 and was the last Spanish colony established in North America. The Anglo, east side, of the town dates from 1879 and the arrival of the Santa Fe railroad. While the railroad brought communication and commerce with the east, and a burst in population to over 2000, it also brought in the most notorious of the west's colorful rabble, including Doc Holliday, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, Wyatt Early, and a number of charmingly named scoundrels, including Hoodoo Brown, Rattlesnake Sam, Cock-Eyed Frank, Web-Fingered Billy, Hook Nose Jim, Stuttering Tom, Durango Kid, and Handsome Harry the Dancehall Rustler. Miguel Otero, the territorial governor, said they were "as tough a bunch of bad men as ever gathered outside a penal institution." For a time Las Vegas became utterly lawless, but the town's citizens soon took things in hand and, vigilante-style, the desperados were cleaned out in the early 1880's, many moving on to the notorious town of Tombstone, in Arizona.

Las Vegas was the largest city in the state in 1900 and it was finally safe to walk the streets, but, as other, better situated, cities grew, the town soon ceased to be an important terminus. The city's prosperity ended with the Great Depression and it settled back into a quiet existence. Its lack of current growth is probably responsible for the fact that it has 918 sites on the National Register of Historic Places.

"Mr. ZW Montague deserves the credit for persuading the Chamber of Commerce in Las Vegas, New Mexico, to act in favor of the Baptists on this occasion. They not only presented the property, which was valued at $350,000 free of debt to the Baptists, but they also offered a . . ." - from the "Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia"

Ida died before 1920. In the 1920 census of Las Vegas, New Mexico as Zenas W. Montague, a 78 year old widower, of New York. Living with him were his daughters, Cora, 40, and Helen, 38.

Zenas gave up on New Mexico, moving to Southern California. In the 1922 city directory of Pasadena, California as Zenas W. Montague, living with his daughters, Cora V., teacher, and Helen, a book keeper, at 2280 Olive avenue. In 1923 Zenas and his daughters were living at 310 East Green in Pasadena. Helen was working for the FM Taylor Optical company.

Zenas W. Montague, aged 82, died on 28 May 1923 in California.

Zenas' children were,
(25) Lela Montague (1870)
(25) Cora V. Montague (1872)
(25) Helen Montague (1876)

(25) Lela Abiah Montague (1870)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805) (24) Zenas Winthrop Montague (1841)

She was born in Jackson county, Iowa in April 1870. In the 1870 census of Prairie Springs, Jackson county as Ida [sic] Montague, 4/12. In the 1880 census of La Motte, Jackson county, Iowa as Lela Montague, 10. In the 1885 census as Lela Abiah Montauge, 14. In the 1895 state census of Center Junction, Jones county, Iowa as Lela Montague, 24. In the 1900 census of Vinton City, Benton county, Iowa as Lela Montague, 30. She was still living at home with her parents, with no occupation shown.

She did not move to New Mexico with her father, but I haven't yet found her in later censuses. I suspect she stayed behind in Iowa and married, though I haven't found any likely Lela's in Iowa.

(25) Cora V. Sally Montague (1872)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805) (24) Zenas Winthrop Montague (1841)

She was born in Clinton county, Iowa on 7 August 1872. In the 1880 census of La Motte, Jackson county, Iowa as Cora Montague, 7. In the 1885 census as Cora Sally Montauge, 12. In the 1895 state census of Center Junction, Jones county, Iowa as Cora Montague, 22. In the 1900 census of Vinton City, Benton county, Iowa as Cora Montague, a 27 year old school teacher.

She was also in the 1910 census of Las Vegas, San Miguel county, New Mexico territory as Cora Montague, a 36 year old teacher in the public school, living with her father. Note that there is another Cora Montague in the 1910 census, living in De Witt, Clinton county, Iowa. She was a 39 year old teacher in the public schools, of Iowa, rooming in the house of John B. Webb. This latter Cora is not our gal.

In the 1920 census of Las Vegas, New Mexico as Cora Montague, a 40 year old bookeeper, of Iowa, living at home with her father, Zenas, and sister, Helen.

In the 1930 census of Compton, Los Angeles county, Calfornia as Cora Montague, a 51 year old sales lady in a dry goods store, of Iowa. She was a roomer in the house of Tim O'Leary. Note that her sister, Helen, also lived in Compton. Cora died in Los Angeles on 3 October 1964. This death record shows, correctly, that her mother's maiden name was Noble.

(25) Helen Marie Montague (1876)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805) (24) Zenas Winthrop Montague (1841)

She was born in Clinton county, Iowa in June 1876. In the 1880 census of La Motte, Jackson county, Iowa as Helen Montague, 4. In the 1885 census as Helen Marie Montauge, 9. In the 1895 state census of Center Junction, Jones county, Iowa as Helen Montague, 19. In the 1900 census of Vinton City, Benton county, Iowa as Helen Montague, a 24 year old stenographer. She was still living at home.

In in the 1910 census of Las Vegas, San Miguel county, New Mexico territory as Helen Montague, a 34 year old book-keeper in a grocery store, living with her father.

In the 1920 census of Las Vegas, New Mexico as Helen Montague, a 38 year old bookeeper, of Iowa, living at home with her father, Zenas, and sister, Cora.

In the 1930 census of Compton, Los Angeles county, California as Helen Montague, a 54 year old book-keeper in a retail drygoods store, of Iowa. She was rooming in the house of Edgar Geisler. Note that her sister, Cora, also lived in Compton.

(24) Adoniram Judson Montague (1845)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805)

Called Judson, A. Judson, and Judson A. Judson was born on 19 May 1845 in La Motte, Jackson county, Iowa. In the 1850 census of Prairie Spring township, Jackson county, Iowa as Judson Montague, 5, born in Iowa. In the 1860 census of Richland township, Jackson county, Iowa as Judson Montague, 15, born in Iowa. David O. Montague shows up on several lists as a donor to the American Baptist Foreign Missionary Society, which may explain his son's name.

Adoniram Judson (1788-1850)

The eldest son of Reverend Adoniram and Abigail Judson, he was a famous Baptist missionary to Burma. He had not seen vast numbers saved directly through his ministry, but he was remembered for his role in the establishment of US missions, his outstanding translation of the Bible into Burmese and his foundational work among the Burmese people.

There was a rash of children named Adoniram or Adoniram Judson around 1850. In World War II a Liberty ship was named for this man.


Adoniram

The name means “my lord is most high; lord of might and elevation.” From the New Testament of the Bible [Kings 12:18]. Adoniram was the son of Abda and was in charge of tribute, that is taxes or forced labor. Stoned to death by the people of Israel. It is not clear to me why the original the missionary, above, was named after this unpopular biblical character.

Judson married Marie Louise [Laura, Lou] Richardson on 25 December 1867 in Scott county, Iowa. She was born on 27 June 1847 in Certreville, Michigan, the daughter of Silas D. M.G. Lamb officiated at the wedding and his clerk was the witness.

In the 1870 census of the 5th ward, Davenport, Scott county, Iowa as Judson Montague, a 25 year old prorietor of the D[avenport] College. This was the Bryant & Stratton Commercial College, at Davenport, Iowa, of which he was the principal. Living with him were his wife, Louisa, 23, of Michigan, and his child, Jessie, 10/12.

In 1875 A.J. Montague was listed as a "Patron" of the "Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa," 1875, by A.T. Andreas. In it he was described as the "Proprietor of the Davenport Business College." The same title was given to a D.R. Lillibridge, probably his partner. During this time A.J. lived on the corner of 16th and Farnam street. Judson was an important enough citizen that an engraving of his home was included in the State Atlas of 1875.










The Davenport Business College and Telegraph Institute

A early commercial school. Today it is headquartered in Grand Rapids with several campuses.

In the 1880 census of Davenport, Iowa as A. Judson Montague, living on East High stree. His parents, David O. and Lucy R. Montague, were living with him. Also living with him were his wife, Lau. R., 32, and his children, Jessie, 11, Roy R., 9, and Carrie, 5. Judson worked in real estate & fire insurance, like his father.

In 1882 he had a real estate office at the corner of Perry and 3rd street, in Davenport, Iowa according to the Iowa State Gazeteer and Business Directory of that year. In that same year A.J. was also noted to be a Deacon of the Second Regular Baptist Church of Christ in Davenport. In 1882 three of his children, Roy, Marie and Lura, died, possibly as a result of an epidemic of smallpox that raged during that year. In 1883 Judson's father, David Owen MOntague, passed away.

In the "Iowa Gazetteer and Business Directory of 1884-1885" A. Judson Montague and Roscoe A. Salibury ran the real estate firm of Montague & Salisbury, on the corner of Perrty and 3rd.

Sometime after 1885, when his youngest son, Orlo, was born in Iowa, Judson moved to Chicago, perhaps to try his hand in a more dynamic real estate market. In the 1890 Chicago Voter Registration as A. J. Montague, of 4556 Champlain Avenue, registered on 14 October 1890. He was born in Iowa. He was also in the 1892 Chicago Voter Registration as A. J. Montague, though the rest is garbled.

In the 1900 census of the 31st ward, Chicago, Cook county, Illinois as A. Judson Montagu [A. Eardean Montagu in Ancestry.com], a 54 year old real estate agent. This document is out-of-focus and very hard to interpret. Living with him were his wife, Lari A., 53, and children, Jessie, a 30 year old cashier in a Comfort H[ouse], Albert R., 16, Alicia, 16, and Orlo C., 15.

In the 1910 census of the 32nd ward, Chicago as A. Judson Montague, a 64 year old real estate agent. Living with him were his wife, Lori [sic] R., 62, Jessie A., a 40 year old cashier in a Comfort Home, Albert R., 25, no occupation, Alicia H., 25, a Kindergarten teacher, and Olo, 24, who was also in real estate.

He was listed, under the name A.J. Montague, in the "History of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition," pages 161 and 393-394. This book included a "full account of the great exposition, embracing the participation of the states and nations of the world, and other events of the St. Louis world's fair of 1904." I haven't seen this source, so this isn't necessarily our man, but the timing and location is right.

In 1917 the firm of A.J. Montague & Son was in business in Chicago.

I think Judson lived in Chicago until his death in 1921, but I haven't been able to find him, or any of the members of his family except Orlo, in the 1920 census. He was then returned for burial in the Oakdale cemetary in Davenport, next to his father, David Owen Montague. Laura died in 1927. She was also buried in Oakdale, in Davenport, but under the name "Lou [sic, probably "Lau"] Richardson Montague, wife."

Judson's children were,
(25) Jessie Arlette Montague (1869)
(25) Roy Richardson Montague (1871)
(25) Carrie May Montague (1874)
(25) Lura Montague (1882)
(25) Albert R. Montague (1884 - twin)
(25) Alice H. Montague (1884 - twin)
(25) Orlo Owen Montague (1885)

(25) Jessie Arlette Montague (1869)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805) (24) Adoniram Judson Montague (1845)

Or Jennie. She was born on 4 November 1869 in Davenport, Iowa. In the 1870 census of the 5th ward, Davenport, Scott county, Iowa as Jessie Montague, 10/12. In the 1880 census of Davenport, Iowa as Jessie Montague, 11.

By 1890 her father had moved the family to Chicago, Illinois. She was mentioned in the Daily Times newspaper of Davenport, Iowa on 7 July 1890 as "visiting friends in this city," which means, I suppose, that she no longer lived in Davenport.

In the 1900 census of the 31st ward, Chicago, Cook county, Illinois as Jessie Montague, a 30 year old cashier in a Comfort H[ouse]. I'm certain this did not have the same connotations that as it does today, that is, a brothel. This was probably the name of a hotel.

In the 1910 census for the 32nd ward, Chicago, Cook county, Illinois as Jessie A. Montague, 40, a cashier in a Comfort Home. In the 1920 census . . .

In the 1930 census of Chicago, 60 years old, with no occupation [retired?], living with her sister, Alice. She died in 1947 and was buried in the Oakdale cemetary, in Davenport, next to her parents. Apparently she never married.

(25) Roy Richardson Montague (1871)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805) (24) Adoniram Judson Montague (1845)

He was born in Davenport, Iowa on 18 [17] August 1871. In the 1880 census of Davenport, Iowa as Roy R. Montague, 9, 5. He died in 1882, at the age of 11. Note that his middle name was his mother's maiden name. He was buried in the Oakdale cemetary, in Davenport, next to his parents. Of significance is that Roy and his sisters, Marie and Lura, below, all died in 1882. This may have been a result of an epidemic. Smallpox was a problem in Davenport in 1882.

(25) Carrie May Montague (1874)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805) (24) Adoniram Judson Montague (1845)

Known as May. She was born on 30 September 1874 in Davenport, Iowa. In the 1880 census of Davenport, Iowa as Carrie Montague, 5. She died in 1882. She was buried in the Oakdale cemetary, in Davenport, next to her parents.

(25) Lura Montague (1882)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805) (24) Adoniram Judson Montague (1845)

Also known as Lena. She was born on 10 April 1882 and died the same year. She was buried in the Oakdale cemetary, in Davenport, next to her parents.

(25) Albert R. Montague (1884 - twin)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805) (24) Adoniram Judson Montague (1845)

He was born in Iowa on 30 April 1884 His middle name may be Richardson in honor of his mother's maiden name, just as it was for his elder brother, Roy. In the 1900 census of the 31st ward, Chicago, Cook county, Illinois as Albert R. Montague, 16. In the 1910 census of the 32nd ward, Chicago as Albert R. Montague, 25, with no occupation.

In the 1920 census . . .

In the 1930 census of district 2270, Oak Park, Cook county, Illinois as Albert R. Montague, a 45 year old civil engineer. Living with him were his wife, Jeanie M., 40, of Illinois, and daughters Jean M., 8, and Mary A., 5.

(26) Jean M. Montague (1922)

(26) Mary A. Montague (1925)

(25) Alice H. Montague (1884 - twin)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805) (24) Adoniram Judson Montague (1845)

She was born in Iowa on 30 April 1884. In the 1900 census of the 31st ward, Chicago, Cook county, Illinois as Alicia Montague, 16. In the 1910 census of the 32nd ward, Chicago as Alicia H. Montague, a 25 year old Kindergarten teacher.

In the 1920 census . . .

Living with her sister, Jessie, in the 1930 census of Chicago, a 45 year old Kindergarten teacher in the public schools. She does not appear to have married.

(25) Orlo Owen Montague (1885)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) David Owen Montague (1805) (24) Adoniram Judson Montague (1845)

Or Arlo. He was born on 16 September 1885 in Davenport, Iowa. Note that his middle name was the same as his grandfather's. In the 1900 census of the 31st ward, Chicago, Cook county, Illinois as Orlo C. Montague, 15. In the 1910 census of the 32nd ward, Chicago as Olo Montague, 24, who was also in real estate. He married Bess Shaul.

Orlo registered for the draft in Chicago in 1917. He was at that time a real estate agent, specializing in industrial real estate, working for A.J. Montague & Son. He was given an exemption for dependency [of his wife?] and industrial [his occupation?]. He was described as tall, of medium build, with brown eyes and dark brown hair.

In the 1920 census as Orlo Montague [Orla in Ancestry.com], a 34 year old real estate man. Living with him were his wife, Bessie, 33, and sister-in-law Helen Shaul, 34, a private secretary.

In the 1930 census of Chicago as Orlo O. Montague, a 44 year old salesman of industrial real estate. Living with him were his wife, Bess S., 42, of Illinois, and daughters, Mabel L., 11 [where was she in 1920?], and Phyllis O., 5, and his sister-in-law, Helen R. Shaul, 40. He was fairly well to do with $35,000 in real estate and he owned his own home.

(26) Mabel L. Montague (1919)

(26) Phyllis O. Montague (1925)


The Montagues of California

For David Owen's youngest son and the line of the family continuing to my wife, Anita Montague, see (24) Leroy Couch Montague (1853), or press the right-arrow key, below.

(23) Emily Montague (1807)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778)

She was born in Vermont in 1807 [or on 24 August 1807 in Syracuse, New York?]. She apparently remained with her mother after her father's death. She married Moses Thompson of Middlebury, New York. She died in California on 14 February 1882.

(23) Peter Ross Montague (1809)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778)

The younger brother of David Owen Montague. He was born on 3 July 1809 in Bridport, Vermont [or Syracuse, New York?]. "History of Chautauqua County, New York" indicates this was Bradford, Vermont, but underscores that his parents were Zenas Montague and Abigail Owen. Bridport is about 10 miles north of Orwell. I like to think that Peter's name helps substantiate, in some small way, the link with his presumed grandfather, (21) Peter Montague, however I wonder where his middle name, Ross, came from? Much of the information that follows comes from the Chautauqua county, New York Bios Forum, "History of Chautauqua Co NY," 1875, by Andrew Young.

Peter moved with his family to Syracuse, New York, where his father, Zenas, died in 1810. He left Syracuse at the age of 3 years with his mother, moving to Middleburry, Genesee county, New York. He later moved to the town of Mina, in western New York, in 1824 with his step-father, Ezra Bisby [Bisbee], who settled on “the farm where Mr. Montague now resides.”

He was one of the earliest settlers to Mina. He came to this town in April 1824 and "cleared a farm from the dense forest to one of thrift and comfort. He knew all the privations and hardships of pioneer life, and met them with untiring energy, as only one of those of early days endured. With greatest industry he made himself and his family a comfortable home."

In the 1830 census of Mina, Chautauqua county, New York he was probably the young man, aged 20 to 30, who was living in the house of his step-father, Ezra Bisby. In the household was a woman, who was probably his mother, Abigail, who would have been 49.

He married Olive F. Hall on 1 January 1835 at French Creek, Chautauqua county, New York. They were married for 56 years and lived in Mina their entire lives. Between 1841 and 1845 Peter's brother, David Owen, left the area and moved his family to Iowa.

In the 1850 census of Mina, Chautauqua county, New York as Peter Montague, a 43 year old farmer, of Vermont. Living with him were his wife, Olive F., 35, of New York, and children, Owen H., 12, Ellen A., 9, Elvira L., 6, Clarisa C., 2, and his step-father, Ezra Bisby, 80. Peter's mother, Abigail, had died in 1840.

In the 1860 census of the French Creek post office, Mina as Peter R. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 50 year old farmer, of Vermont. Living with him were his wife, Olive, 43, of New York, and children, Owen, a 22 year old farmer, Ellen, 19, Elvira, 15, Clarrissa, 11, and Harriet, 5. Both Peter R. and Olive Montague were also included in the Chautauqua County, New York list of Will Testators.

In the 1870 census of Mina as Peter R. Montague, a 61 year old farmer, of Vermont. He had real estate worth $10,800 and personal property worth $4,800. Living with him were his wife, Olive, 55, and children, Owen, 32, and Hattie [Harriet], 15.

In the 1880 census of Mina as Peter Montague [Montauge in Ancestry.com], a 70 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Olive, 64, and daughter, Hattie, 25.

It was noted of his that he had "been a resident of the town 70 years, has never, since he was entitlted to vote, missed but one fall election, is a strong Republican, has held the office of commissioner of highways 16 years, has served 21 years as overseer of the poor. Is a Baptist in his religious preference. He has always been a farmer on the place settled by his step-father." - from "History of Chautuaqua County, New York."

He passed peacefully away at his home in Mina on 18 October 1896 at the advanced age of 87 years 3 months, his wife preceding him by 5 years when she died on 19 September 1891. He was confined to his bed only 2 days.

The Mina Corners Cemetary has tombstones for both an Oliver R. Montague (1815-1891) of Chautauqua and Peter R. Montague (1809-1896) of Mina. Both were also Will Testators for Chautauqua county. Oliver is probably another transcription error for Olive, Peter’s wife.

Peter's children were,
(24) Owen H. Montague (1838)
(24) Ellen A. Montague (1841)
(24) Elvira L. Montague (1844)
(24) Clarisa [Clara] C. Montague (1848)
(24) Harriet [Hattie] S. Montague (1854)

(24) Owen H. Montague (1839)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) Peter Ross Montague (1809)

He was born on 10 March 1838 in New York. His first name was given in honor of his grandmother's family, the Owens. Was his middle name Hall, in honor of his mother's? In the 1850 census of Mina, Chautauqua county, New York as Owen H. Montague, 12. In the 1860 census of the French Creek post office, Mina as Owen Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 22 year old farmer. In the 1870 census of Mina as Owen Montague, 32.

He moved to Wattsburg, Erie county, Pennsylvania where he married Cornelia I. Tracy on 9 March 1871. She was born on 27 October 1842 in Wattsburg, Pennsylvania.

In the 1880 census of Venango township, Erie county, Pennsylvania as O. H. Montague [Montaque in Ancestry.com], a 41 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Cornelia, 37, and daughter, Mary, 7.

In the 1900 census of Venango township as Owen Montague, a 61 year old [March 1839] farmer, of New York. Living with him were his wife, Cornelia, 57 [October 1842], and son, Tracy, 16 [April 1994], both born in Pennsylvania.

In the 1910 census of Venango township as Owen Montague, aged 71 dairy farmer. Living with him was his wife, Cornelia, 60. Cornelia had 2 childen, both of whom were still living.

In the 1920 census of Wattsburg township, Erie county as Owen H. Montague, aged 81. He was living with his daughter, Mary, and her husband William H. Cornell. Presumably Cornelia had died.

Owen's children were,
(25) Mary Elizabeth Montague (1873)
(25) George (Tracy) P. Montague (1884)

(25) Mary Elizabeth Montague (1873)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) Peter Ross Montague (1809) (24) Owen H. Montague (1839)

She was born on 11 February 1873 in Wattsburg, Erie county, Pennsylvania. In the 1880 census of Venango township, Erie county, Pennsylvania as Mary Montague [Montaque in Ancestry.com], 7.

She married William H. Cornell on 17 June 1897. In the 1920 census of Wattsburg township, Erie county her father, Owen H. Montague, was living with her and her husband, William H. Cornell.

(25) George (Tracy) P. Montague (1884)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) Peter Ross Montague (1809) (24) Owen H. Montague (1839)

Known as Tracy Peter, Tracy for his mother. He was born on 30 April 1884 in Wattsburg, Erie county, Pennsylvania. He seems to have been referred to as Tracy as well, seemingly in honor of his mother's maiden name [?]. In the 1900 census of Venango township, Erie county, Pennsylvania as Tracy Montabue, 16 [April 1994], born in Pennsylvania.

There was, in 1910, a case presented before the U.S. Supreme Court, involving the Moore Printing Typewriter Company, Russell W. and George P. Montague, appellants, vs. the National Savings and Trust Company. This was not our George, but George Prescott Montague, 1849-1936, a distinguished lawyer and distant relative, a descendent of Richard Montague of Hadley, Massachusetts.

In the 1910 census of the 2nd ward, Union borough, Erie county, Pennsylvania as Tracy Montague, a 26 year old butcher in a meat market. He was a boarder in the house of Fred Bunce.

He married Grace G. Still. She was born on 17 May 1893.

In the 1920 census of Union borough as Tracy P. Montague, a 35 year old cattle dealer. Living with him were his wife, Grace G., 26, and children, Genevieve M., 5, Rosemary, 3 9/12, and Harriet G., 1, all of Pennsylvania.

In the 1930 census of Union borough as Tracy P. Montague, a 45 year old merchant in the oil business. Living with him were his wife, Grace G., 35, Genevieve M., 15, Rose M., 13, and Harriet G., 11. Also living with him was his mother-in-law, Abbie Still, 73. The following is from an heir, Frederick R. Pusch .

"I guess I could tell you a lot about the Montague's. Owen Hall Montague was a milk and egg salesman so to speak in Wattsburgh, Pa. He had two children, Mary Elizabeth and Tracy Peter. ( I never knew my grandfathers first name was George and neither did my mother. He was always known as Tracy. He was sent to a boys school at a young age and was terminated for gambling in his teen years. He later started a butcher shop in Union City, Pa. where he met and married Grace Still, one of nine children. He sold the butcher shop and started the Keystone gasoline company which ended up in some sort of legal battle. He then built the Consumers Oil Company, sold that and started Montague Livestock Auction the oldest livestock Auction in Pa. He died in 1953 and my mother and father ran the business until my father died in 1974. My mother ran the business for a couple of years after my fathers death and then closed it down. It caught on fire and burned to the ground shortly after. My grandfather had three daughters. My mother, Genevieve Montague was born first and then Rosemary Montague followed by Harriette Montague. Rosemary and Harriette are both dead but my mother is still living at ninety-one in her own home. My mother had two children Christine Montague and myself Frederick Richard. Rosemary had three children. Karen Montague, Peter Montague, and Charles Beecher Hatch. Hariette had two boys Gregory Baker and Steven Montague. All of us live near each other with the exception of Charles who lives in Catersville, Ga. We are more like bothers and sisters than first cousins and are together constantly. The cane has always been a bone of contention in our family. Since my mother is still living I have the cane that I mentioned but Peter Montague claims that the cane will be his when my mother dies since his name is Peter Montague. Since I ever can remember the Montague's were very important in all of our lives and I could go on and on and maybe even write a book!! My cousin Steve has the genealogy book on the Montague's which is hard to follow I think. I love to go to the Wattsburgh cemetery and look at the tombstones but can't figure out who is who. Back to the girls! My mother Genevieve married Frederick Richard Pusch from Beaver, Pa. Rosemary married Charles Hatch originally from Pasadena, California, and Hariette Married Cassius Sears from Corry, Pa. The first cousins range in age between 64 and 53. I am 57 and my sister is 60. Karen Montague Hatch the oldest cousin had three children Jason, Melinda and Andrew Blakeslee. Peter Montague Hatch had three children Peter Montague Hatch , Keri Hatch and Mary Hatch all of which live in Bemis Point New York about forty miles from here. Charles has two adopted children, Margo and James Hatch. Christine Montague Pusch has three children, Amanda Montague Daggett, John Tracy Daggett, and Abigail Daggett. I have two children Lauren Montague Pusch and Jacob Dietrich Pusch. Gregory Baker Sears has one child Colin Montague Sears and Steven had two children Mark Sears and Danielle Montague Sears."

(26) Genevieve M. Montague (1915)

(26) Rose M. Montague (1917)

(26) Harriet G. Montague (1919)

(24) Ellen A. Montague (1841)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) Peter Ross Montague (1809)

She was born on 23 March 23 1841 at Mina, New York. In the 1850 census of Mina, Chautauqua county, New York as Ellen A. Montague, 9. In the 1860 census of the French Creek post office, Mina as Ellen Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 19.

She married Theodore M. Ryan of Foxburg, Pennsylvania on 22 January 1867 at Mina.

(24) Elvira L. Montague (1844)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) Peter Ross Montague (1809)

Called Vinah. Also as Alvira. She was born on 23 December 1844 in Mina. In the 1850 census of Mina, Chautauqua county, New York as Elvira L. Montague, 6. In the 1860 census of the French Creek post office, Mina as Elvira Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 15.

She married Hubbard T. White on 14 January 1867 in Mina. They later lived in Jamestown.

(24) Clarisa [Clara] C. Montague (1848)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) Peter Ross Montague (1809)

She was born on 5 November 1848. In the 1850 census of Mina, Chautauqua county, New York as Clarisa C. Montague, 2. In the 1860 census of the French Creek post office, Mina as Clarrissa Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 11.

She married Dana P. Horton on 5 September 1867 in Mina. She died on 28 September 1875. She was buried in the Mina Cemetery.

(24) Harriet S. Montague (1854)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) Zenas Montague (1778) (23) Peter Ross Montague (1809)

She was born on 26 June 1854. In the 1860 census of the French Creek post office, Mina as Harriet Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 5. In the 1870 census of Mina as Hattie Montague, 15. In the 1880 census of Mina as Hattie Montague [Montauge in Ancestry.com], 25.

Hattie never married.

(22) Patty Montague (1783)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751)

She was born on 23 March 1783 in Westhampton, Massachusetts. On 23 February 1804 she married Paul Wright. After Paul's death in 1838 she married the Reverend Jeptha Pool.

(22) David Montague (1788)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751)

He was born on 16 January 1788 in Westhampton, Massachusetts, the younger of Peter's two sons. He married Louisa Janes in 1816 [or 20 January 1810] in Westhampton. She was born on 15 March 1792 in Easthampton, the daughter of Enos Janes and Hannah Wright.

In the 1820 census of Westhampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts as David Montague, a farmer. In his household were 2 boys under 10 years old, Melzer and Enos, and a man, 26 to 45, David. David would have been 32 to 34 years old at this time. Women in the house included 2 girls under 10, Mary Ann and Sylva, and one woman, 26 to 45, Louisa. He was living next-door to his father, Peter Montague.

Cynthia Montague is portrayed as "dau. of Zenas Montague, and adopted dau. of David Montague of Westhampton, Mass." - from "The History of the Descendants of Elder John Strong" by Benjamin Woodbridge Dwight. Note that Zenas was David's elder brother and that Cynthia married Rowland Strong, having a son named Zenas Montague Strong.

In the 1830 census of Westhampton as David Montague. His household included 1 son under 5, Alfred, 1 who was 5 to 10, David Jr., 2 that were 10-15, Melzer and Enos, 1 man 20 to 30, unknown, and one man 40 to 50 years old, David. David was 44 at the time. Women in the house inclued 1 girl under 5, Lovisa, 1 girl who was 10 to 15, Sylvia, 1 who was 15 to 20, Mary Ann, and a women 30 to 40 years old, which was probably Louisa.


I don't see David in the 1840 census, though there was a David Montague in North Hampton, Hampshire county.

In the 1850 census of Westhampton as David Montague, a 62 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Louisa, 58, and children, David, 25, Alfred, 21, Henry W., 19, Louisa H., 16, and Lucinda, 13.

In the 1860 census of Westhampton as David Montague, a 72 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Louisa, 68, and children, Louisa, 26, Henry, 29, Lucinda, 23, and Sylvia, age unclear, perhaps 9. Also living with him was a Charles Marsh, 20. I don't know who this was, but note that David had a daughter named Sylvia Marsh Montague, so perhaps there was a relationship. David's son, David Jr., was living 'next-door.'

In 1863 there was a meeting of the Hadley Montagues. David O. Montague, eldest son of Zenas Montague, came back to Westhampton where his "uncle David Montague" showed him "the house and home of my grandfather Peter . . ." - from "Meeting of the Montague Family at Hadley, Mass." by Richard Montague.

David died on 10 April 1864, though the death record from the Town lists 12 April.

In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Louisa Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 78 year old widow. Living with her were her children, Hannah L., 36, with no occupation, and Syliva M., a 19 year old music teacher. Her son, Henry, lived next door. Louisa Janes Montague died on 13 October 1870. The inscription reads,

"Lovicy J.
Wife of
David Montague
Died
Oct 13 1870
Aged 78 years
Her children rise up and call her blessed"

David and Louisa's children were,
(23) Mary Ann Montague (1814)
(23) Sylva Montague (1816)
(23) Reverend Melzer Montague (1818)
(23) Reverend Enos Janes Montague (1820)
(23) Hannah Wright Montague (1823), she died young
(23) David Smith Montague Jr. (1825)
(23) Lovisa Montague (1827), she died young
(23) Alfred Dwight Montague (1829)
(23) Henry Wright Montague (1831)
(23) Louisa Hannah (1834)
(23) Nancy Lucinda Montague (1837)
(23) Silvia Marsh Montague (1850)

(23) Mary Ann Montague (1814)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

She was born on 1 Janaury 1814.

(23) Sylva Montague (1816)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

She was born on 2 March 1816 in Westhampton. She married Philander S. March on 8 May 1835. She died on 2 November 1850 in Chicopee, Hampden county, Massachusetts.

(23) Reverend Melzer Montague (1818)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

He was born on 5 May 1818. He graduated from Williams College in 1841, then studied theology at the Theological Institute, East Windsor, Connecticutt, graduating from there in 1844. He went to Wisconsin as a home missionary in 1844 and became the pastor of the Congregational church in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin. After his voice began to fail he devoted himself to teaching.

He married Mary Hale in May 1845 in milwaukee, Wisconsin. In the 1850 census of Fort Atkinson, Jefferson county, Wisconsin as a 32 year old Congregational minister. Living with him were his wife, Mary, 28 [?], and daughter, Josephine K., 2.

In the 1860 census of Sharon township, Walworth county, Wisconsin as a 43 year old Principal of an Academy. Living with him were his wife, Mary, 39, Josephine, 12, and Mary, 8. In the 1870 census of Sharon township as M. Montague, a 52 year old clergyman, of Massachusetts. Living with him were his wife, Mary, 49, and child, Mary W., 19.

Melzer died on 30 December 1872 in Allen's Grove, Wisconsin.

(24) Josephine K. Montague (1848)

She was born on 20 August 1848.

(24) Mary Wortley Montague (1851)

She was born on 14 April 1851.

(23) Reverend Enos Janes Montague (1820)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

He was born on 16 March 1820 in Westhampton and named for his grandfather. He graduated from Williams College in 1841 and from the Theological Seminary, East Windsor, Connecticut in 1845. He was ordained a minister on 14 May 1846 and became pastor of the Congregational churches in Summit, Oconomowoc, and Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin - I assume he accompanied his older brother, Melzer. He was a leading minister for thirty-four years and for twenty-four years he was a permanent clerk of the State Convention of Congregational Churches and Ministers.

He married Faith Huntington Hooker on 11 May 1846. She was born on 6 November 1824 in Green Farms, Fairfield, Connecticut, the daughter of Edward William Hooker and Faith Trumball Huntington.

From the Waukesha Freeman, a newspaper in Wisconsin, in an article about the history of the First Presbyterian church of Summitt, Wisconsin, dated 14 November 1901:

"The church was supplied portions of the time by different pastors until the arrival of the Rev. Enos Montague, who was sent from New England by the Home Missionary society, and commenced his labors July 19, 1846, he continued his pastorate there seventeen years . . . At the installation services introductory exercises were by . . . Rev. Melzer Montague of Fort Atkinson . . ."
In the 1850 census of Summit, Waukesha county, Wisconsin as E.J. a 30 year old Presbyterian minister. Living with him were his wife, F.H., 26, E.H., 2, and Elizabeth H., 6/12. In the 1860 census of Summit township as Enos Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 40 year old Cong. Clergyman. Living with him were his wife, Faith, 35, of Connecticut, and children, Edward, 12, and Elizabeth, 10, both of Wisconsin.

From the Waukesha Freeman, dated 14 November 1901:

"In the course of events and changes in the community it was deemed wise by the church to connect itself with the Oconomowoc church. Mr. Montague went to reside in1863, and ministered to the combined church for several years."
In the 1870 census of Oconomowoc township, Wasukesha county as Enos [Edwin in Ancestry.com] J. Montague, a 50 year old Cong. clergyman. Living with him were his wife, Faith, 45, and daughter, Mary, 8. Oddly, it claims that Mary and Faith were born in Massachusetts.

In the 1880 census of Springvale, Fond Du Lac county, Wisconsin, as E.J., a 60 year old clergyman. Living with him were his wife, F.H., 55, and Mary, 19, who was attending school. Enos died on 30 September 1880 and was buried in Westhampton, Massachusetts.

Enos' widow was listed in the Washington, D.C. city directory of 1890 as "Faith H. Montague, widow Enos J., 1108 8th Northwest." Enos' children were,
(24) Edward Hooker Montague (1847)
(24) Elizabeth Hooker Montague (1849)
(24) Mary Jane Montague (1850)

(24) Edward Hooker Montague (1847)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Reverend Enos Jones Montague (1820)

He was born on 9 December 1847 in Summit, Wisconsin. He died on 6 January 1861 and was buried in the Summit cemetery, Waukesha county, Wisconsin. His tombstone reads,

Edward Hooker
Son of
Rev. E. J. & F. H.
Montague
Died Jan 6, 1861
Aged 13 years & 28 days

(24) Elizabeth Hooker Montague (1849)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Reverend Enos Jones Montague (1820)

She was born on 23 December 1849 in Summit, Wisconsin. She was educated at Ripon College and at Fox Lake Female College, Wisconsin. Ripon College is a private liberal arts college located in Fond du Lac county. Elizabeth married Price Colby Claflin on 8 October 1872. He was born on 17 October 1849 in Summit, Wisconsin.

(24) Mary Jane Montague (1850)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Reverend Enos Jones Montague (1820)

She was born on 11 September 1850 in Summit, Wisconsin. She was educated at Ripon College, Wisconsin. In the 1880 census of Springvale, Fond Du Lac county, Wisconsin, as Mary Montague, 19, who was attending school while living at home.

She married Harry Huntington Powers on 4 October 1882. He was born on 7 August 1859 in Hebron, Wisconsin.

(23) Hannah Wright Montague (1823)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

She was born on 20 March 1823 and died on 10 July 1829.

(23) David Smith Montague Jr. (1825)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

He was born on 1 February 1825. In the 1850 census of Westhampton as David Montague Jr., 25, living at home with his parents.

He married Lucinda Clark on 25 November 1851. In the 1860 census of Westhampton as David Montague Jr., a 35 year old farmer living 'next-door' to his father, David Sr. Living with him were his wife, Lucinda, 33, and son, Myron, 1.

Lucinda Clark died and, on 2 June 1864, David married Asenath Parsons. In the 1870 census of Westhampton as David Montague [Montagno in Ancestry.com], a 45 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Asenath, 37, and children, Myron H., 11, and Amelia L., 4.

Asenath

From the bible, Genesis 61:45. She was the daughter of Poti-pherah, a priest of the Eqyptian god On, and the wife of Joseph.

In the 1880 census of Westhampton as David S. Montague, a 56 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Asenath C., 50, Myron H., a 21 year old farmer, and Amelia L., 14.

David died between 1880 and 1900. In the 1900 census of Westhampton was his widow, Asenath P. Montague, 68 [March 1830]. She was living with her daughter, Aurelia L., 33 [November 1865], and her husbnad, Henry M. Clapp.

In the 1910 census Westhampton as Asenath P. Montague, a 79 [sic] year old widow. She was living with her daughter, Aurelia [sic] L. Clapp, 45, and her husband, Henry M. Clapp, 46.

David's children were,
(24) Myron Henry Montague (1858)
(24) May Lucinda Montague (1862)
(24) Amelia L. Montague (1866)

(24) Myron Henry Montague (1858)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) David Smith Montague Jr. (1825)

He was born on 22 August 1858. In the 1860 census of Westhampton as Myron Montague, 1. In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Myron H. Montague [Montagno in Ancestry.com], 11. In the 1880 census of Westhampton as Myron H. Montague, a 21 year old farmer, still living at home with his parents.

He married Emma Frances Bridgman on 11 June 1884. She was born on 1 June 1860, the daughter of Franklin Augustus Bridgman and Eliza Augusta Rust. From: Genealogy of the Bridgman Family:

"He was killed (thrown from his carriage) Jan. 5, 1885."
He was driving a young colt which got frightened, threw him from the carriage, and killed him instantly. He was only 25 years old. On 11 December 1889 his widow, Emma, married Alfred D. Montague, Myron's cousin, below.

(24) May Lucinda Montague (1862)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) David Smith Montague Jr. (1825)

She was born on 12 June 1862. She died on 20 September 1862.

(24) Amelia L. Montague (1866)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) David Smith Montague Jr. (1825)

Her name might be Aurelia Lucinda. She was born on 15 November 1866. A daughter of Asenath. In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Amelia L. Montague [Montagno in Ancestry.com], 4. In the 1880 census of Westhampton as Amelia L. Montague, 14.

Aurelia married Henry M. Clapp. In the 1900 census of Westhampton as Aurelia L. Clapp, 33 [November 1865]. She was living with her husbnad, Henry M. Clapp, and her widowed mother, Asenath P. Montague, 68 [March 1830].

In the 1910 census as Aurelia L. Clapp, 45, the wife of Henry M. Clapp, 46. Living with them was Aurelia's mother, Asenath P. Montague, a 79 year old widow.

(23) Lovisa Montague (1827)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

She was born on 21 January 1827 and died on 18 January 1831.

(23) Alfred Dwight Montague (1829)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

He was born on 6 March 1829 in Westhampton. In the 1850 census of Westhampton as Alfred Montague, 21, living at home with his parents.

He married Sophia Clapp on 17 June 1858. She was born on 29 March 1828 in Westhampton. In the 1860 census as Alfred Montague [Gruntergen in Ancestry.com!], a 31 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Sophia, 32, and son, Francis, 10/12.

In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Alfred Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 41 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Sophia C., 42, and children, Francis C., 10, Edward H. 9, Louisa J., 7, Alfred D., 5, and Harriet C., 2.

In the 1880 census of Westhampton was Alfred D. Montague, a 51 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Sophia C., 52, and sons Francis C., 20 [or 26?], Edward H., 19, and Alfred D. Jr., 14, and daughters Louisa J., 17, and Hannah F., 11.

Alfred died before 1900. In the 1900 census of Westhampton was Alfred's widow, Sophia, 72 [March 1828]. She had 5 children, all living. Living with her was her daughter, Louisa J., 37 [February 1863]. Her sons, Francis and Edward, lived near by. In the 1910 census of Westhampton as Sophia, a 82 year old widow, was living with her son-in-law, Charles G. Loud. Her niece Francis P., 9, was also there, but not her mother, Hannah, who had apparently died. Sophia's other daughter, Louisa J. was also living there.

Alfred's children were,
(24) Francis Clapp Montague (1859)
(24) Edward H. Montague (1861)
(24) Louisa Janes Montague (1863)
(24) Alfred Dwight Montague Jr. (1865)
(24) Harriet Francis Montague (1868)

(24) Francis Clapp Montague (1859)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829)

Known as Frank. He was born on 5 August 1858. In the 1860 census as Francis Montague [Gruntergen in Ancestry.com], 10/12. In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Francis C. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 10. In the 1880 census of Westhampton was Francis C. Montague, 20, still living at home.

Alfred married Alice Rosanna Woodard, of Vermont. In the 1900 census of Westhampton as Frances Montague [Montaque in Ancestry.com], a 40 year old farmer. Living with him was his wife, Alice R., 36 [September 1863]. They had been married 17 years, but had no children. Also living with him was his mother-in-law, Hossana Woodard, and her daughter, Grace Woodward, 8. Living nearby was his widowed mother, Sophia, and brother, Edward.

Francis died after 1900. In the 1910 census of Westhampton was Francis' widow, Alice R. Montague, 47. Living with her was her adopted daughter, Grace, 18. Francis and Alice had no children of their own.

(24) Edward H. Montague (1861)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829)

He was born on 20 March 1861. In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Edward H. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 9. In the 1880 census of Westhampton was Edward H. Montague, 19.

He married Susan Parson, of Massachusetts. In the 1900 census of Westhampton as Edward Montague, a 39 year old farmer. Living nearby was his widowed mother, Sophia, and brother, Francis. Living with him was his wife, Susie, 41 [January 1859]. They had been married 11 years, but had no children.

In the 1910 census of Westhampton, Massachusetts as Edward H. Montague [Montaque in Ancestry.com], a 49 year old dairy farmer. Living with him was his wife, Susan, 51. She had no children. His little brother, Alfred, and his widowed mother, Sophia, lived nearby.

In the 1920 census of Westhampton as Edward H. Montague, a 58 year old dairy farmer. Living with him was his wife, Susan E., 59. There was no evidence of children. He was a Deacon in the church.

(24) Louisa Janes Montague (1863)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829)

Or Lovisa. She was born on 24 February 1863. In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Louisa J. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 7. In the 1880 census of Westhampton was Louisa J. Montague, 17. In the 1900 census of Westhampton as Louisa J. Montague, 37 [February 1863], living with her widowed mother, Sophia.

In the 1910 census of Westhampton as Louisa J. Montague, living with her brother-in-law, Charles G. Loud. Francis P. Loud, 9, her neice, was also there, but not her sister, Hannah/Harriet, who had apparently died. Sophia was also living with Charles Loud.

In the 1920 census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Louis Montague, at 56 years old, she was still living with her brother-in-law, Charles G. Loud, 45, and her niece, Francis P., 19, but her mother had died.

In the 1930 census of Westhampton as Louis J. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 67 year old "old-maid," living with her brother-in-law, Charles Loud.

(24) Alfred Dwight Montague Jr. (1865)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829)

He was born on 31 October 1865. In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Alfred D. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 5. In the 1880 census of Westhampton as Alfred D. Montague Jr., 14.

He married Emma Frances Bridgman on 11 December 1889. She was born on 1 June 1860, the daughter of Franklin Augustus Bridgman and Eliza Augusta Rust. This was her second marraige. She had been married to Alred's cousin, Myron Henry Montague, but he had died in a fall in 1885.

I have not found Alfred in the 1900 census.

In the 1910 census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Alfred G. Montague, a 44 year old farmer, living 'next-door' to his brother, Edward H. Living with him were his wife, Emma F., 49, and children, Evelyn F., 19, Marian R., 17, Enos J., 16, Fay B., 9, Edward H., 7, and his sister-in-law, Minnie H. Bridgman, 47. Alfred and Emma had been married 20 years. Emma had 5 children, all living. Note: Alice R. Montague, Francis' widow, was the enumerator!

Emma apparently died in 1918. He then married Julia Miller Edwards. In the 1920 census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Alfred G. Montague, a 54 year old dairy farmer. Living with him were his wife, Julia E., 54, Edward H., 17, and Fay B., a 19 year old milk tester [garbled[ at Amherst College. Alfred's sister-in-law, Minnie H. Bridgman, still lived with him. His older brother, Edward, was living next door.

Alfred died in 1927 and was buried in the Center cemetery in Westhampton. In the 1930 census of Westhampton was his widow, Julia M., 64. Living with her was her step-son, Fay B., a 29 year old laborer in a dairy. Julie lived until 1960.

Alfred's children were,
(25) Evelyn F. Montague (1891)
(25) Marian R. Montague (1893)
(25) Enos Janes Montague (1896)
(25) Fay B. Montague (1901)
(25) Edward A. Montague (1903)

(25) Evelyn F. Montague (1891)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829) (24) Alfred D. Montague Jr. (1866)

In the 1910 census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Evelyn F. Montague, 19, living at home.

(25) Marian R. Montague (1893)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829) (24) Alfred D. Montague Jr. (1866)

In the 1910 census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Marian R. Montague, 17, living at home.

(25) Enos Janes Montague (1896)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829) (24) Alfred D. Montague Jr. (1866)

Or Enis. In the 1910 census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Enos J. Montague, 16. In the Amherst city directory of 1912 as "Montague, Enos J., F.C. Plumb."

Enos may have been an officer in the U.S. Army during World War I. An Enos J. Montague was listed in Company 2, of the 17th Provisional Training Regiment at Plattsburg, New York Training Camp, in 1917. This was the site of the National Army's Officer Candidate School in 1917. The camp was established in 1911 and held courses for prospective officers intermittently until America's entry into World War I. The Regular Army at the time was very small and totally insufficient for the requirements of fighting in Europe. The National Guard was called out to augment the Regular Army, but the total manpower was still insufficient. The United States Government then decided upon a course of conscription of men for a "National Army." These draftees would need officers to train and lead them, thus the reason for the facility at Plattsburg, New York. The officer candidates listed in the rosters from which this information was culled, were members of the second class of 1917, conducted in August, September, October and November, 1917. The facility was commanded by Colonel P. A. Wolf. There were 9 companies in the 17th Regiment and 7 in the 18th. There was also a Provisional Artillery Training Regiment of 6 Batteries. Note there was also a detachment of the 17th Regiment at Fort Des Moines, Iowa which trained black officers.

Enos married Millicent Canning. In the 1920 census of Amherst, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Enos J. Montague, a 26 year old manager on a farm. Living with him was his wife, Millicent C., 21.

In the 1930 census of Amherst as Enos J. Montague, a 36 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Millicent C., 31, and children, Richard C., 8, and Alfred D., 5.

In the Amherst city directory of 1932 as "Montague, Enos J. (Millicent C), supt farm dept, h MSC grounds." In the 1935/1935 directories as "Montague, Enos J. (Millicent C), land bank appraiser Federal Land Bank 310 State h at Amherst." In the 1938/1940/1942 directories as "Montague, Enos J. (Millicent C) farmer h813 N Pleasant (5)." He was listed in various directories through 1954.

In the 1960 directory of Amherst his widow was listed as "Montague, Millicent C wid Enos J h 845 N Pleasant." Enos' children were,
(26) Richard C. Montague (1922)
(26) Alfred D. Montague (1925)

(26) Richard C. Montague (1922)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829) (24) Alfred D. Montague Jr. (1866) (25) Enos Jones Montague (1896)

He was born in Amherst, Massachusetts. In the 1930 census of Amherst as Richard C. Montague, 8. He married Gladys.

(26) Alfred D. Montague (1925)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829) (24) Alfred D. Montague Jr. (1866) (25) Enos Jones Montague (1896)

He was born on 13 April 1925 in Amherst, Massachusetts. In the 1930 census of Amherst Alfred D. Montague, 5. He married Claire. He apparently lived most of his life in Amherst. He was in the city directory in 1954 as "Montague, Alfred D (Claire H) emp Spfld Vt r E Pleasant." In 1957 as ". . . emp Florence . . ." In 1960 as ". . . rem to Northfield." He died in March 1965.

(26) David Montague (c1930)

He was probably born in Amherst, Massachusetts. He married Martha Reims. In the Amherst city directory of 1960 as "Montague, David (Martha K) clk Holyoke h N East RD 3."

(26) Stephen C. Montague (c1930)

He was probably born in Amherst, Massachusetts. He married Rita. In the Amherst city directory of 1960 as "Montague, Stephen C in US Air Force r 845 N Pleasant."

(25) Fay B. Montague (1901)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829) (24) Alfred D. Montague Jr. (1866)

In the 1910 census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Fay B. Montague, a son, 9. In the 1920 census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Fay B. Montague, a 19 year old milk tester [garbled[ at Amherst College.

In the Suffield, Massachusetts city directory of 1928 as "Montague Fay B emp United Dairy Systems Inc r 18 Plainfield." In the 1930 census of Westhampton as Fay B. Montague, a 29 year old laborer in a dairy, living at home with his widowed step-mother, Julia.

In the Amherst city directory of 1960 as "Montague, Fay B (Cornelia S) supv UofMass h West SA RD 1."

(25) Edward A. Montague (1903)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829) (24) Alfred D. Montague Jr. (1866)

He was probably born on 30 December 1902. In the 1910 census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Edward H. Montague, 7. In the 1920 census of Westhampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Edward H. Montague, 17.

In the 1930 census of Westhampton as Edward A. Montague, a 27 year old dairy farmer. Living with him were his wife, Sadie M., 26, and children, Edward A. Jr., 5, Frank B., 4, and Joyce E., 2. Edward and Sadie had been married for about 7 years. He was living next door to his widowed step-mother, Julia, and brother, Fay.

Edward probably died on 27 January 1976 in Westhampton. His children were,
(26) Edward A. Montague Jr. (1924)
(26) Frank B. Montague (1925)
(26) Joyce E. Montague (1928)

(26) Edward A. Montague Jr. (1924)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829) (24) Alfred D. Montague Jr. (1866) (25) Edward A. Montague (1903)

He was born on 10 May 1924. In the 1930 census of Westhampton as Edward A. Montague Jr., 5. During some period he lived in Texas, where he got his social security card. He died on 17 September 2004 in Easthampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts.

(26) Frank B. Montague (1925)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829) (24) Alfred D. Montague Jr. (1866) (25) Edward A. Montague (1903)

He was born on 6 November 1925. In the 1930 census of Westhampton as Frank B. Montague, 4. He died on 4 March 1999 in Easthampton, Hampshire county, Massachusetts.

(26) Joyce E. Montague (1928)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829) (24) Alfred D. Montague Jr. (1866) (25) Edward A. Montague (1903)

In the 1930 census of Westhampton as Joyce E. Montague, 2.

(24) Harriet Francis Montague (1868)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Alfred D. Montague (1829)

Also known as Hannah? She was born on 2 September 1868 in Westhampton. In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Harriet C. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 2. In the 1880 census of Westhampton as Hannah F. Montague, 11.

She married Charles Gilbert Loud on 22 June 1899 in Westhampton. He was a dairy farmer like her brothers, Edward and Alfred. Was Charles the brother of Julia Loud who married Nathan L. Montague, Hannah's cousin, below? Charles was born on 28 April 1874 in Williamsburg, Hampshire county, Massachusetts. They had two daughters, Frances and Eunice.

Harriet died on 30 August 1904. Her daughter Eunice died in the same year. In the 1910 census of Westhampton her widowed husband, Charles G. Loud, 36, was listed. Living with him were his daughter, Francis P., 9, his mother-in-law, Sophia, and sister-in-law, Louisa J. In the 1920 census of Westhampton, Louisa J. was still living with him, but Sophia had deceased.

(23) Henry Wright Montague (1831)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

He was born on 17 April 1831. In the 1850 census of Westhampton as Henry W. Montague, 19, living at home with his parents. In the 1860 census of Westhampton as Henry Montague, 29, living at home with his father.

He married Achsah L. Burt in 1869 [Achsah is a biblical name, the daugther of Caleb]. Inthe 1870 census of Westhampton as Henry Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 39 year old. Living with him were his wife, Achach [sic], 32, and Calvin Montague, a 79 year old laborer. I'm not sure he's any relation.

In the 1880 census of Westhampton was Henry W. Montague, a 44 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Achsah, 42, and children, Henry B., 7, and Nathan L., 6.

In the 1900 census of Westhampton as Henry W. Montague, 1 69 year old [April 1831] farmer. Living with him were his wife, Achsah L. [Asksah in Ancestry.com], 62 [March 1838], and son, Nathan L., a 26 year old [April 1874] tool maker. Henry and Achsah had been married for 32 years. Achsah had 2 children, both of whom were still living.

In the 1910 census of the 1st ward of Springfield, Hampden county, Massachusettshe as Achsah L. Montague, a 72 year old widow. She was living with her son, Nathan L., 36, and his wife, Julia.

Henry's children were,
(24) Henry Burt Montague (1872)
(24) Nathan Lyman Montague (1874)

(24) Henry Burt Montague (1872)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Henry W. Montague (1829)

He was born on 7 July 1872. His middle initial is from his mother's maiden name, Burt. In the 1880 census of Westhampton as Henry B. Montague, 7.

In the 1900 census of Southbridge, Worcester county, Massachusetts as H. B. Montague, a 27 year old [July 1872] lawyer. He was a lodger.

He married Elizabeth E. Perry. In the 1910 census of Southbridge as Henry B. [N in Ancestry.com] Montague, a 37 year old lawyer in general practice. Southbridge is about 20 miles east of the Connecticut river valley towns of Hadley and Westhampton. Living with him were his wife, Elizabeth P, 39, and son, Robert P., 2. In the Southbridge city directory of 1919 as "Montague, Henry B (Elizabeth P) lawyer Main c Hamilton h Park ave c Spring."

In the 1920 census of Southbridge as Henry B. Montague, a 47 year old lawyer. Living with him were his wife, Elizabeth P., 49, and his son, Robert P., 12. Also living with him were his mother-in-law, Evelyn E. Perry, 73, and two nieces, Elizabeth P., 18, and Bertha Lore [or Love], 12.

In the 1930 census of Southbridge as Henry B. Montague, a 57 year old lawyer. Living with him were his wife, Elizabeth P., 59, and son, Robert P., 22. Young Robert had no occupation.

(25) Robert P. Montague (1907)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Henry W. Montague (1829) (24) Henry Burt Montague (1872)

He was born on 16 October 1907. In the 1910 census of Southbridge as Robert P. Montague, 2. In the 1920 census of Southbridge as Robert P. Montague, 12. In the 1930 census of Southbridge as Robert P. Montague, 22. He was still living at home and had no occupation. Robert died in May 1984 in Southbridge, Massachusetts.


I had thought that the following might be our Robert, above, but another researcher has shown me that this was Robert Paul Montague, the son of William Kelley Montague and Mary Mueller, born on 6 March 1923 in Virginia, Minnesota. He was a veteran of World War II. A Staff Sergeat Robert P. Montague was in the crew of 1st Lieutenant Donald D. Waldorf, a B-24 pilot. The crew were,

Waldrof, Donald (P) 1 Lt O-809035 - Pilot
Glasullo, Libro J. (CP) 2 Lt O-549198 - Copilot
Mangan, Albert F. (N) 1 Lt O-493714 - Navigator
Biegler, Stewart E. (N2) 2 Lt O-703687 - Asst Navigator
Schwab, Vern R. (B) 2 Lt O-695378 - Bombardier
Cohen, Russell R. (R) T/Sgt 36355668 - Radioman
Edwards, Edison R. (E) T/Sgt 34646117 - Engineer/Gunner
Larsen, Norland E. (G) S/Sgt 37460094 - Gunner
Montague, Robert P. (G) S/Sgt 17154802 - Gunner
Wolf, Kenneth C. (G) S/Sgt 13126160 - Gunner
They were assigned to the 851st Squadron, 490th Bomb Group (Heavy). The B24H the Waldorf crew flew initially was called "Ole Baldy," #42-94863. This was while they were in training at Mountain Home Army Air Base in Idaho in late 1943/early 1944. The ferried this aircraft across the Atlantic via the southern route.

The Group arrived in the European Theater on 28 April 1944 and was stationed at Eye Army Air Base, in England. "Ole Baldy" was the first to arrive at the new station. However, that aircraft was taken away from them and replaced, on 7 May, by "Short Bier," a B-24J, #44-40442. After more training, their first combat mission was flown on D-Day. They flew a total of eight combat missions in this aircraft.

The 851st Bomb Squadron, 490th Bomb Group

The Group was activated on 1 October 1943 at Salt Lake City Army Air Base, Utah. They transferred to Mountain Home Army Air Field, Idaho, where the Group formed and trained from December 1943 to April 1944. Aircraft started overseas movement on 12 April 1944 taking the southern ferry route, via Florida, Trinidad, Brazil, Dakar and Marrakesh to England.

They initially trained in B-24H and transitioned to the B-24J for their first combat missions. They entered combat in June 1944 bombing airfields and coastal defenses in France immediately preceding and during the invasion of Normandy. They then struck bridges, rail lines, vehicles, road junctions, and troop concentrations in France. They supported ground forces near Caen in July and near Brest in September 1944.

They converted to the B-17G and operated primarily against strategic targets until the end of February 1945. They mounted attacks against enemy oil plants, tank factories, marshalling yards, aircraft plants, and airfields in such cities as Berlin, Hamburg, Merseburg, Munster, Kassel, Hannover, and Cologne. They interrupted strategic missions to attack supply lines and military installations during the Battle of the Bulge, from December 1944 to January 1945. Beginning in March 1945, they attacked interdictory targets and supported advancing ground forces. After V-E Day, they carried food to flood-stricken areas of Holland and transported French, Spanish, and Belgian prisoners of war from Austria to Allied centers. They returned to the US in August 1945 and were inactivated on 7 November 1945.

Beginning in mid-July 1944 the crew were detached to train at Sudbury with the 486th BG as a "GH" crew. Gee-H, as it was commonly known, was an electronic device that allowed a bomber to find its target, even in bad weather, based on signals transmitted from stations in England. Usually one aircraft, a pathfinder, had this equipment and would lead the Group to the target. All aircraft would drop their bombs on the pathfinder's signal.

A temporary assignment to the 34th BG followed their training, during which they flew aboard a GH-equipped B-24, "Winnie the Pooh," #41-28880. I assume this was a chance for further training in which they would practice the skills they had learned in a real world environment.

B-24 #41-28880

A B-24H known as "Winnie the Poo." This was a Gee-H equipped pathfinder aircraft.

This aircraft was transferred to the 486th Bomb Group where it received its shark-mouth design and the Poo-Bear, originally on the aircraft, was removed. Oddly, it kept the orignal name on its nose, though the 486th knew it informallyas "The Ghost Ship." The plane returned to the 34th BG in late July 1944. This is what the aircraft looked like with Robert P. Montague flew aboard her.

Missions with the 34th Bomb Group,

Mission #46 July 29, 1944, 23 aircraft dispached, #41-28880, B/S Waldorf - Juvincourt - Took off at 0432 hours. Flew Lead of a 490BG Squadron attacking Laon. Carried 6 500 lb bombs. Dropped on Primary at 0842 hours from 23,000 feet. No battle damage reported. Landed 1046 hours. Check landing gear. Inspected and repaired. Charging cable to left nose gun broken. Replaced.

Mission #47 July 31, 1944, 35 aircraft dispatched, #41-28880, B/S Waldorf - Laon Athies - Took off at 0906 hours. Flew Deputy Lead, position 1-2 in Lead Squadron. Carried 6 500 lb bombs. Dropped on Primary at 1309 hours from 22,500 feet. No battle damage reported. Landed 1549 hours. Throttles need adjusting. Inspected and repaired.

On 11 August the Waldorf crew moved back to the 490th BG. Their training, however, was for naught as the Group then transitioned into the B-17G bomber. They were assigned to B-17G, #43-38112, which they flew from 15 August. This is according to a Butch Edwards, the son of the crew's Engineer/Gunner. However, while this aircraft was part of the 851st Squadron of the 490th BG, the only reference I find to it, a landing accident at Eye on 13 November 1944, shows the pilot to be Paul T. Foret. Some missions our crew flew back with the 490th Bomb Group that I found, notably in a different aircraft, "Alice Blue Gown," were,

September 30, 1944 43-38400 G/L Waldorf Alice Blue Gown Flew Lead of High Squadron of 490BG
October 18, 1944 43-38400 G/L Waldorf Alice Blue Gown Flew Deputy Lead, position 1-2 in Lead Squadron of 490BG
November 21, 1944 43-38400 G/L Waldorf Alice Blue Gown Flew Deputy Lead, position 1-2 in Low Squadron of 490BG
November 30, 1944 43-38400 G/L Waldorf Alice Blue Gown Flew Deputy Lead, position 1-2 in Low Squadron of 490BG
December 4, 1944 43-38400 G/L Waldorf Alice Blue Gown Flew Deputy Lead, position 1-2 in High Squadron of 490BG
December 5, 1944 43-38400 G/L Waldorf Alice Blue Gown Flew Deputy Lead, position 1-2 in Lead Squadron of 490BG
December 12, 1944 43-38400 G/L Waldorf Alice Blue Gown Flew Lead of Low Squadron of 490BG
Below is a photo of the "nose-art" on their aircraft, "Alice Blue Gown." The crew returned to the United States on 17 April 1945.

Robert Paul Montague died on 28 November 2010 in Dallas, Texas.

(24) Nathan Lyman Montague (1874)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788) (23) Henry W. Montague (1829)

He was born on 29 April 1874 in Westhampton, Massachusetts. The Lyman's were a family that had been residents of Westhampton since its founding. I'll guess that the middle name of Nathan's mother, Achsah L. Burt, was Lyman in honor of her mother. In the 1880 census of Westhampton was Nathan L. Montague, 6. In the 1900 census of Westhampton as Nathan L. Montague, a 26 year old [April 1874] tool maker, living at home with his parents.

He married Julia Loud. She was born on 12 July 1870 in Massachusetts. In the 1910 census of the 1st ward of Springfield, Hampden county, Massachusettshe as Nathan L. Montague, a 36 year old automobile toolmaker. Living with him were his wife, Julia L., 39, a daughter, Caroline S., 6/12, and his mother, Achsah L., 72.

Nathan Lyman Montague, 44, registered for the draft in 1917 while living in Springfield. He was at the time working for the U.S. Government as a tool maker. He was described as being of medium height and build, with blue eyes and black hair.

By 1920 he had moved to Pasadena. In the 1920 census of Pasadena, Los Angeles county, California as Nathan L. Montague, a 46 year old continator [?, garbled] for a private firm, of Massachusetts. Living with him were his wife, Julia L., 49, his daughter, Caroline S., 10. Also living with him were his mother-in-law, Louise Loud, 65, and his niece, Mabel, a 33 year old secretary.

In the 1930 census of Pasadena as Natahn L. Montague, a 57 year old mechanic in a research laboratory. Living with him were his wife, Julia L., 59, and his daugther, Caroline, 20.

Julia died on 15 May 1964 in Los Angeles. I assume Nathan died there somewhat earlier.

(25) Caroline Montague (1910)

(23) Louisa Hannah Montague (1834)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

Her name is alternately Hannah and Louisa. She was born on 11 January 1834. In the 1850 census of Westhampton as Louisa H. Montague, 16, living at home with her parents. In the 1860 census of Westhampton as Louisa Montague, 26, living at home with her parents. In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Hannah L. Montague, 36, with no occupation. She was living with her widowed mother. She married Elijah P. Torrey on 25 August 1874.

(23) Nancy Lucinda Montague (1837)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

She was born on 7 May 1837. In the 1850 census of Westhampton as Lucinda Montague, 13, living at home with her parents. In the 1860 census of Westhampton as Lucinda Montague, 23, living at home with her parents. She died on 16 May 1864.

(23) Silvia Marsh Montague (1850)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Peter Montague (1751) (22) David Montague (1788)

She was born on 21 October 1850. In the 1860 census of Westhampton as Sylvia Montague, 9, living at home with her parents. In the 1870 census of Westhampton as Syliva M. Montague, a 19 year old music teacher. She was living with her widowed mother.

(21) Moses Montague (1756)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724)

He was born on 7 May 1756 in South Hadley. He married Martha Graves in 1780. She was born on 28 April 1759, the daughter of Captain Perez Graves and Martha Gillett. She was Moses' cousin, some number of times removed, via Moses' grandmother, Sarah Graves. Their family lines meet at (18) John Graves (1644).

They settled in Norwich, now Huntington, Massachusetts, "going there on horseback with only marked trees to guide them." Norwich is about 12 miles southwest of South Hadley. In the 1790 census of Norwich, Hampshire county, Massaschusetts as Moses Montague. The census included one "free white male 16 years old, and up, Moses, and 3 women, probably Martha and two daughters, one of whom was Sophia.

I haven't found any Montagues in the Norwich census in 1800 or 1810. In the 1820 census of Norwich as Moses Montague, a farmer. The census included 2 boys under 10, 2 who were 10 to 16 years old, a man who was 26 to 45 years old, and one who was over 45. Moses would have been 64. There was also one woman over 45. It is not clear who the younger males in the household were. It is tempting to see the young man as Moses' son-in-law, the husband of Sophia, below, and the four boys as his grandchildren, but I don't know this.

Moses died on 5 October 1835 in Huntington, Hampshire county, Massachusetts. His tombstone in Norwich cemetery reads "Lt. Moses Montague" indicating that he probably held a commission in the militia at some point. Martha died on 5 Janaury 1820. So far I've been unsuccessful in finding latter day Montagues in Huntington.

Moses' children were,
(22) Sophia Montague b. 30 August 1785 in Norwich

(21) Selah Montague (1761)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724)

He was born in South Hadley on 17 February 1761. He married Electa Winter on 10 January 1787 in South Hadley. She was born on January 1765 in Chesterfield, Massachusetts. They settled in Bridgewater, Windsor county, Vermont. In the 1790 and 1800 census for Bridgewater as Selah Montague. He died on 17 May 1812 and was buried in North Bridgewater, Vermont. His children were,
(22) Betsey Montague b. 22 December 1787
(22) Clarissa Montague b. 15 May 1789
(22) David Montague b. 27 September 1791
(22) Moses Montague b. 11 October 1792
(22) David Montague b. 29 September 1795
(22) Daniel Montague b. 29 August 1798
(22) Otis Montague b. 1 November 1802
(22) Electa Montague b. 5 July c1805
(22) Rowena Montgue b. 29 August 1807
(22) Laura Montague b. 12 October 1810

(21) Seth Montague (1763)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724)

He was born on 2 July 1763 in South Hadley. He married Rachel Smith on 10 September 1794. She was born on 14 December 1772 in Amherst, Massachusetts, the daughter of Simeon Smith and Rachel Strong. They moved north to Wilmington, Windham county, Vermont after 1800.

In the 1800 census of Wilmington, Windham county, Vermont as Seth Montague. In the 1810 census of Bennington, Vermont as Seth Montague. Rachel died on 2 July 1813 in Bennington, Vermont.

I don't see Seth in the 1820 census. Around 1820 Seth took his sons, Daniel and Rodney, and left Massachusetts, moving to Hunter's Bottoms, Kentucky on the Ohio river. I've not been able to find this place. Other sources call this a move to Ohio itself. Seth then moved on to Edgar county, Illinois. From the "History of Edgar County,"

"The first jury trial was at the May term of 1824 . . . The jury was as follows: Seth Montague, . . ."
Seth died on 13 August 1827 in Grand Prairie, Edgar county, Illinois.

Edgar county, Illinois

This county lies in the eastern part of the state, bordering on Indiana, at almost exactly the state's mid-point. The Grand Prairie river runs through the county, feeding the Wabash.

Seth's children were,
(22) David Montague (1791)
(22) Moses Montague (1792)
(22) Erastus Montague (1795)
(22) Theodosia Montague (1797)
(22) Daniel Montague (1798)
(22) Rodney Montague (1800)
(22) Otis Montague (1802)
(22) Luman Montague, b. 30 March 1803, m. Elvira Clark 7 February 1831, d. 6 October 1875
(22) Amasa Smith Montague, b. 7 April 1805, m. Julia Ann Thompson 26 June 1828, d. 4 May 1880
(22) Hannah Montague, b. 20 March 1808, m. Lyman Strong 29 April, 1829, d. 7 May 1885
(22) Seth Newel MOntague, b. 10 July 1810, m. 1st Jerlina Johnson, 2nd, Mary Cathrine Bennet about 1824, 19 November 1835, d. 21 March 1851 Nevada City, Nevada

(22) David Montague (1791)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763)

He was born on 27 September 1791. I've found little about this eldest son.

(22) Moses Montague (1792)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763)

There is some confusion between this Moses and the son of Seth's brother, Selah, above. Moses was born on 11 October 1792, probably in South Hadley, Massachusetts. He married Annis Dike on 1 Janaury 1815. As an adult he moved north into Vermont, as did many in the Connecticut river valley. In the 1820 & 1830 census of Bridgewater, Windsor county, Vermont as Moses Montague.

In the 1850 census of Bridgewater as Moses Montague, a 59 year old farmer, of Vermont [?]. Living with him were his wife, Annis, 61, and children, Caroline, 22, Laura, 17, Justin S., a 34 year old farmer, Ruth S., Justin's 34 year old wife, and Justin's two children, Justin E., 9, and Frances [a girl], 3. Also in the 1850 census of Bridgewater was a Fanny Montague, 24, of Vermont. She was living in the Thomas household.

In the 1860 census of Bridgewater as Moses Montague [Montagno in Ancestry.com], a 69 year old farmer, of Vermont. Living with him were his wife, Clara, 70 [a 2nd wife?], and children, Justin, a 44 year old farmer, his wife, Ruth, 44, and children, Edward, 18, Francis, 13, Charles, 9, and Clara, 2.

In the 1870 census of Woodstock, Windsor county, Vermont as Moses Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 78 year old widower, of Massachusetts [they finally got it right]. He was living with his son, Justin P. [?] Montague, 54.

Moses' children were,
(23) Justin Montague (1816)
(23) Fanny Montgue (1826)
(23) Caroline Montague (1828)
(23) Laura Montague (1833), b. 20 April 1833, Bridgewater, Vermont

(23) Justin Montague (1816)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763) (22) Moses Montague (1792)

In the 1850 census of Bridgewater as Justin Montague, a 34 year old farmer, of Vermont. He was living with his parents. His family was there as well, his wife, Ruth S., 34, and children, Justin E., 9, and Frances [a girl], 3.

In the 1860 census of Bridgewater as Justin Montague [Montagno in Ancestry.com], a 44 year old farme. He was living with his father, Moses Montague [Montagno in Ancestry.com], a 69 year old farmer, of Vermont. Also living with them was Justin's family, his wife, Ruth, 44, and children, Edward, 18, Francis, 13, Charles, 9, and Clara, 7.

In the 1870 census of Woodstock, Windsor county, Vermont as Justin P. [?] Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 54 year old farmer, of Vermont. Living with him were his wife, 54, children, Clara, 17, Edward, a 28 year old farmer, Charles R., 20, and his father, Moses, 78.

In the 1880 census of Woodstock, Windsor county, Vermont as Justin S. Montague, a 64 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Ruth, 63, and children, Edward J., a 38 year old farmer, and Clara A., 26.

Justin's children were,
(24) Justin Edward Montague (1841)
(24) Frances Montague (1847)
(24) Charles R. Montague (1851)
(24) Clara A. Montague (1853)

(24) Justin Edward Montague (1841)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763) (22) Moses Montague (1792) (23) Justin Montague (1816)

He was born in September 1841. During his father's life he was known by his middle name, Edward. In the 1850 census of Bridgewater as Justin E. Montague, 9. In the 1860 census of Bridgewater as Edward Montague [Montagno in Ancestry.com], Edward, 18.

In the 1870 census of Woodstock, Windsor county, Vermont as Edward Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 28 year old farmer, living with his parents. In the 1880 census of Woodstock, Windsor county, Vermont as Edward J. Montague, a 38 year old farmer, living with his parents, and sister, Clara A., 26.

In the 1900 census of Woodstock, Windsor county, Vermont as Justin E. Montague, a 58 year old farmer, of Vermont. He was a single man. Living with him was his sister, Clara A., 47 [March 1853].

In the 1910 census of Woodstock as Justin E. Woodstock, a 68 year old farmer, of Vermont. He was single. His sister, Clara A., 57, also single, was living with him. He had no children.

(24) Charles R. Montague (1851)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763) (22) Moses Montague (1792) (23) Justin Montague (1816)

He was born in July 1850. In the 1860 census of Bridgewater as Charles Montague [Montagno in Ancestry.com], 9. In the 1870 census of Woodstock, Windsor county, Vermont as Charles R. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 20, still living at home with his parents.

In the 1880 census of Woodstock as Charles Montague, a 29 year old who kept a cookstore. Living with him were his wife, Louise, 30, and children, Ruth, 4, Louisa, 3, and Susie, 1.

In the 1900 census of Woodstock as Charles R. Montague, a 49 year old book keeper. Living with him were his wife, Louise M., 50 [July 1849], and children, Susie, a 21 year old [March 1879] clerk in a savings bank, and Roger, 12 [July 1887]. Also living with him were his married daughter, Ruth E. Wright, 24 [April 1876], and her daughter, Ruth M., 9/12 [August 1879].

In the 1910 census of Woodstock was Charles' widow, Louise F. [?], 60. Living with her was her daughter, Susanna, a 31 year old book keeper at a savings back.

Charles' children were,
(25) Ruth Montague
(25) Louisa Montague
(25) Susie Montague
(25) Roger Montague (1887)

(25) Roger Montague (1887)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763) (22) Moses Montague (1792) (23) Justin Montague (1816) (24) Charles R. Montague (1851)

He was born on 29 July 1887 in Woodstock, Vermont. In the 1900 census of Woodstock as Roger Montague, 12 [July 1887], living at home with his parents.

In the 1910 census of Worcester, Massachusetts as Roger H. Montague, a 22 year old foreman at a bicycle saddler, of Vermont. He was single and lodging in the house of Laura H. Haradin.

Roger married Margaret A. Armsby, of Massachusetts, in about 1915. She was the daughter of Amos and Alice Armsby, of Millbury.

In the City Directory of Millbury for 1917 as "Montague, Roger H. supt (W) h. Main n Summer." In 1918 Roger was the clerk of the Millbury Board of Trade.

Roger Howard Montague, 29, registered for the draft on 8 June 1917. He was born on 29 July 1887 in Vermont, but was then living in East Brookfield, Worcester county, Massachusetts. He was the superintendent of the Graton & Knight Manufacturing company of Worcester. This company made a number of leather products, including scabbards for World War I bayonets and "pure oak tanned leather belting" for belt-powered industrial applications. He requested an exemption from the draft based on his wife and one child. He was described as tall, of medium build, with grey eyes and light brown hair.

In the 1920 census of Millbury as Roger [Roges in Ancestry.com] Montague, a 33 year old book keeper in a leather factory. Living with him were his wife, Margaret, 32, and son, Richard, 4. In the City Directory of Millbury for 1928 as "Montague, Roger H. (Margt A) purch agt h35 Main."

In the 1930 census of Millbury, Worcester county as Roger H. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 42 year old education supervisor in a factory. He was not a veteran. Living with him were his wife, Margaret A., 43, and children, Richard A., 14, and Horace M., 10. Also living with him was his sister-in-law, Sarribel [?] Armsby, 46, and 3 boarders. He lived on Main street.

In the City Directory of Millbury for 1938-1939 as "Montague, Roger H. instr r35Main." On the same page was "Montague Horace M. student, r35Main," and "Montague Rich A. student, r35Main."

In the City Directory of Millbury for 1951, 1953-1954, and 1957-1958 as "Montague, Roger H (Marjorie H) personnel mgr Taft Pierce Co. (Woonsocket, RI) h. 35 Main 635."

Roger died in October 1975 in Concord, Middlesex county, Massachusetts. He would have been 88 years old.

Roger's children were,
(26) Richard A. Montague (1916), perhaps b. 1 March 1916, d. April 1985, Bend, Deschutes county, Oregon [Bend is in the middle of nowhere, Oregon]
(26) Horace M. Montague (1920), b. 1 April 1920, d. 16 September 1986, Fresno, California

(22) Erastus Montague (1795)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763)

He was born on 29 July 1795, probably in South Hadley, Massachusetts. He moved north to Bennington, Vermont and married Lucy Robinson. She was born on 11 December 1789 in Bennington, the daughter of Samuel S. Robinson and Esther Safford. In the 1830 census of Bridgewater, Vermont as Erastus Montague.

In the 1850 census of Bennington, Vermont as Erastus Montague, as 55 year old mason, of Massachusetts. Living with him were his wife, Lucy, 50, and children, William L., a 25 year old farmer, and Samuel F. [?], a 24 year old farmer. Also living with him was his brother-in-law, Safford Robinson, 66.

Erastus died on 18 January 1852 in Gainsville, Cook county, Texas. What was he doing there? Note that his brother, Daniel, lived there so perhaps this was just intended as a visit. Erastus' sons were,
(23) William Smith Montague (1825)
(23) Samuel Follet Robinson Montague (1826)

(23) William Smith Montague (1825)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763) (22) Erastus Montague (1795)

He was born on 22 February 1825 in Bennington, Vermont. He married Julie in 1839. His children were,
(24) Julia Smith Montague, b. 6 November 1840

(23) Samuel Follet Robinson Montague (1826)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763) (22) Erastus Montague (1795)

He was born on 21 September 1826 in Bennington, Vermont. He married Elsie Mary Haughwout on 14 August 1853 [or 1858] in New York City. He died in 1896. His children were,
(24) John Henry Montague (1857), b. about 1857 Rockfall, Whites county, Illinois, m. Sarah Alice Woodworth 27 November 1878, d. 2 June 1855
(24) Mary Lucy Montague (1857)
(24) Jesse Davis Montague (1860)

(22) Theodosia Montague (1797)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763)

She was born on 16 January 1797. She first married Peter Moore on 7 November 1815. Second she married John Phelps on 7 September 1820. She died on 6 February 1878 in Rock Falls, Illinois.

(22) Daniel Montague (1798)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763)

He was born on 29 August 1798 at South Hadley, Massachusetts. A noted figure in Texas history, he was a pioneer surveyor, state senator, and foreman of the jury involved in the Great Hanging at Gainesville. The son of Seth and Rachel (Smith) Montague. He moved to Vermont after 1800 and was educated as a surveyor and engineer. As a young man he moved first to Ohio. In 1819 he and a younger brother, Rodney, went to Virginia to work for some eighteen months in the Kanawa Salt Works. Then Montague traveled down the Mississippi and settled in Louisiana, where he worked as a surveyor and established a plantation.

He moved to Texas in 1836 to assist Sam Houston, but arrived after the battle of San Jacinto. He then returned to Louisiana to settle his business affairs and in 1837 brought his family to Texas to settle at Old Warren in the Fannin Land District on the Red River. He and William Henderson built a general merchandise store at Warren, probably in 1838. As the first surveyor of that district he amassed a large estate. Montague became a leader in the settlers' fight against the Indians. In 1843 he led the attack in what was said to be the last Indian fight in what is now Grayson County. The grove in which the Indians were killed came to be known as Montague's Grove.

Montague was a member of the Snively expedition in 1843, and during the Mexican War he served as a Captain of volunteers in the Third Regiment, Texas Mounted Volunteers, under the command of Col. William C. Young. By 1849 Montague had moved to Cooke County, where he was employed to survey the county boundaries and locate the county seat.

In the 1850 census of Cooke county, Texas as Danl Montauge, a 52 year old farmer, of Massachusetts. Living with him were his wife, Jane, 30, of Virginia, and children, Elizabeth, 14, of Louisiana, and Nancy, 11, and Daniel R., 9, of Texas.

Afterward, he continued his work as a surveyor and amassed extensive landholdings in Cooke, Grayson, Collin, Fannin, and Montague counties. He was elected district surveyor in 1854, Cooke county commissioner in 1858 and 1862, and state senator in 1863.

In the 1860 census of Cooke county as Daniel Montague, a 61 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Jane, 42, and son, Daniel, 19.

When the Union League of Texas, a secret organization of northern sympathizers, was discovered in Cooke County in 1862, Montague was one of the twelve men selected by a citizens' group to serve on a jury for the event that came to be known as the Great Hanging at Gainesville. He was elected by his fellow members to preside over the jury.

p> After the Civil War, with his wife and son, Daniel R., he moved to the valley of the Tuxpan River in Mexico. He was the only juror to escape being tried during Reconstruction for involvement in the Great Hanging. In September 1876, after his son died, he returned to Texas to live with his daughter and her husband, Elizabeth and William Carroll Twitty, near Marysville in Cooke County.

Montague was active in the Methodist Church. He was married four times, first to Rebecca Covington McDowell on 28 February 1825 in Amite county, Mississippi. She died on 15 January 1831. In this marriage he had three children, only one of whom survived to adulthood.

On 11 May 1833, Montague married Mrs. Sarah Margaret Ross Grilling. She died on March 21, 1841. They had four children. He married Mary Dugan on 13 November 13 1841. They had two children, neither of whom survived infancy.

Montague's fourth wife was Jane Elizabeth Shannon, whom he married on 6 August 1848. No children were born to this marriage. Montague died on 20 December 1876 in Marysville, Cooke County, Texas.

Montague County, Texas where he had served as surveyor, was named in his honor. See also Daniel Montague for more information.

Daniel's children with Rebecca Covington were,
(23) Rebecca Montague, b. 23 November 1825 in Louisiana, m. William Carroll Twitty 1842, d. 18 April 1849, Gainesville, Cooke county, Texas
(23) Seth Newell Montague, b. 15 August 1827, d. 13 August 1831
(23) Luman Montague, b. 10 January 1831, died in infancy

Daniel's children with Sarah Margaret Ross were,
(23) Jane Ross Montague, b. 19 October 1834, 14 March 1838
(23) Elizabeth Montague, b. 5 February 1836, m. William Carrool Twitty [her sister's husband] 11 September 1851
(23) Nancy Montague, b. 15 February 1839, d. 11 December 1854
(23) Daniel Ross Montague, b. 31 March 1841, d. 1 February 1876 in Tuxpan valley, Mexico

Daniel's children with Mary Dugan were,
(23) James Newell Montague, b. 9 January 1843, d. 12 July 1843
(23) Catherine Vaden Montague, b. 21 October 1845, d. 1848

(22) Rodney Montague (c1800)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763)

He was born on 6 August 1800 in Hadley, Massachusetts. His father moved the family to Vermont after 1800. As a young man he moved to Ohio with his father and brother, Daniel. In 1819 he and Daniel went to Virginia to work for some eighteen months in the Kanawa Salt Works.

While Daniel went down the Mississippi and settled in Louisiana, Rodney moved to Illinois. He married Eunice Priscilla Dennison on 16 October 1843 in Waddams Grove, Stevenson county, Illinois. She was born in about 1818 in Brooklyn, Cuyahoga county, Ohio, the daughter of Daniel Dennison and Sarah Bushnell.

He later married her sister, Louisa Amelia Dennison, on 11 October 1852 in Brooklyn, Ohio.

(22) Otis Montague (1802)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Seth Montague (1763)

He was born on 1 November 1802. He is sometimes shown as a son of Selah.

(21) Elijah Montague (1771)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724)

He was born on 21 April 1771 in South Hadley, Massachusetts. He married Rachel Lyman on 23 October 1794. She was born on 10 March 1772, the daughter of Israel Lyman and Rachel Beal. In the 1800 census of South Hadley as Elijah Montague. Rachel died on 27 September 1803.

He next married Abigail "Nabby" White on 12 March 1806. She was born on 7 July 1779. In the 1810 census of South Hadley as Elijah Montague. Nabby died on 2 November 1823. He died on 20 February 1843.

Elijah's children were,
(22) Obed Montague (1799)
(22) Wealthy Montague (1795)
(22) Moses Montague (1797)
(22) Sally Montague, b. 22 July 1802, d. 16 September 1864

(22) Obed Montague (1799)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771)

He was born on 11 August 1799, the son of Elijah Montague and Rachel Lyman. Obed first married Mary Newell. In the 1830 census of South Hadley as Obed Montague. Also in the 1840 census of South Hadley as Obed Montague [Obed Montique in Ancestry.com].

He second married Chloe Lewis Bliss. She was born on 17 October 1809, the daughter of Gaius Bliss and Flavia Keep. In the 1850 census of South Hadley as Obed [Abel in Ancestry.com] Montague, a 50 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Chloe, 40, and children, Edwin N., 16, Mary N., 14, and Emily B., 9.

In the 1860 census of South Hadley as Obed Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 60 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Chloe L., 50, and children, Edwin M., a 26 year old teacher, Mary N., 24, Emily B., 14, and Richard H., 9.

In the 1870 census of South Hadley as Obed Montague, a 71 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Chloe, 60, and children, Emily B., 29, and Richard H., 19.

In the 1880 census of South Hadley as Obed Montague, an 80 year old. Living with him were his wife, Chloe L., 70, and daughter, Emily B, 39.

From a letter of Ellen P. Bowers, Mount Holyoke Seminary, South Hadley of 1 November 1880,

"This letter ought not to go on its way without making mention of Mr. Obed Montague's death, which occurred in January. His house, you know, has always been a kind of Seminary home. Mrs. Montague's friendship and kind deeds, which began with the Seminary's beginning, have continued until now, and the daughter at home follows in her footsteps. They will probably leave the old homestead in the spring. Wherever they are, may they be ministered unto in every time of need, as they have ministered unto others."
A similar letter of 28 March 1889,
"One of the few links which bind us to the earliest years of our Seminary was broken ill December by the death of Mrs. Obed Montague. The old home, you remember, was given up at Mr. Montague's death; since then Mrs. Montague has lived in the village a part of the time. She died at the home of Mrs. Payson Williston in Northampton, where Miss Emily remains. What pleasant memories will always come with the mention of her name to a great many who, as Seminary girls and teachers, have partaken of her kindness and bounty in years past!"
Obed's children with Mary Newell were,
(23) Edwin N. Montague (1834)
(23) Mary N. Montague (1836)
(23) Emily Bliss Montague, b. 2 November 1840
(23) Harriet Ester Montague, b. 31 July 1844, she apparently died young

Obed's children with Chloe Lewis Bliss were,
(23) Richard Henry Montague (1851)

(23) Edwin N. Montague (1834)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771) (22) Obed Montague (1799)

He was born on 27 August 1833 in South Hadley. In the 1850 census of South Hadley as Edwin N. Montague, 16. In the 1860 census of South Hadley as Edwin N. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], a 26 year old teacher.

There is an Edwin Newell Montague, the son of Obed, who married Lucy Marie Colton on 25 December 1866 in Greenwich, Massachusetts. She was born on 9 August 1832 in Prescott, Massachusetts, the dauther of David Colton and Azuba Chapin. In the 1870 census of Monson, Hampden county, Massachusetts as Edwin Montague, a 36 year old life insurance agent. Living with him were his wife, Lucy, 37, and daughter, Mary N.

Edwin died before 1880. In the 1880 census of South Hadley was Edwin's widow, Lucy M., 47. Living with her were her children, Mary N., 17, Harriet C., 9, and Henry C., 7.

Edwin Newell Montague's children were,
(24) Mary Newell Montague, b. 14 February 1869
(24) Harriet Chapin Montague, b. 10 December 1870
(24) Henry Colton Montague (1872)

(24) Henry Colton Montague (1872)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771) (22) Obed Montague (1799) (23) Edwin N. Montague (1834)

He was born on 19 September 1872 in Monson, Hampden county, Massachusetts. In the 1880 census of South Hadley as Henry C. Montague, 7. His father died not long after his birth.

Henry married Aurora, of Massachusetts, in about 1895. In the 1900 census of Washington D.C. as Henry C. Montague, a 27 year old [September 18721] "elect" [electrician?], of Massachusetts. Living with him was his wife, Aurora, 27 [June 1872]. He disappears after this

(23) Richard Henry Montague (1851)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771) (22) Obed Montague (1799)

He was born on 16 February 1851. In the 1860 census of South Hadley as Richard H. Montague [Montagne in Ancestry.com], 9. In the 1870 census of South Hadley as Richard H. Montague, 19.

(22) Wealthy Montague (1795)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771)

He was born on 11 October 1795.

(22) Moses Montague (1797)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771)

He was born on 8 September 1797 in South Hadley. He married Harriet Smith on 18 October 1820. He died on 20 March 1885. His children were,
(23) Clara Smith Montague, b. 25 November 1822, d. 8 March 1845
(23) Moses Lyman Montague (1822)
(23) Harriet Montague, b. 22 april 1825
(23) Calvin Newton Montague (1827)
(23) Samuel Montague (1829)
(23) Elliot Montague (1831)
(23) George Lowell Montague (1833)
(23) Charles Montague (1836)
(23) Abby Montague, b. 8 November 1839
(23) Abby Lucina Montague, b. 10 December 1842

(23) Moses Lyman Montague (1822)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771) (22) Moses Montague (1797)

He was born on 25 November 1822.

(23) Calvin Newton Montague (1827)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771) (22) Moses Montague (1797)

He was born on 16 March 1827. He married Lucy Elvira Judd on 22 September 1831. She was born on 22 September 1831, in Geneva, New York, the daughter of Levi Judd and Elvira Taylor. He died on 9 May 1920. Lucy died on 26 Janaury 1902 in South Hadley.

Calvin's children were,
(24) Clara Elvira Montague, b. 3 September 1858, d. 7 February 1929
(24) Mary Lyman Montague, b. 17 July 1869
(24) Wallace Newton Montague, b. 1 December 1871, Amherst, Massachusetts, M. Martha Adaline Allison 27 June 1906, d. 31 March 1935 in Rochester, Monroe county, New York

(23) Samuel Montague (1829)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771) (22) Moses Montague (1797)

He was born on 24 August 1829.

(23) Elliot Montague (1831)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771) (22) Moses Montague (1797)

He was born on 25 July 1831.

(23) George Lowell Montague (1833)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771) (22) Moses Montague (1797)

He was born on 15 December 1833.

(23) Charles Montague (1836)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Captain Moses Montague (1724) (21) Elijah Montague (1771) (22) Moses Montague (1797)

He was born on 30 August 1836.

(20) Josiah Montague (1727)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690)

He was born on 10 November 1727 in Granby, Massachusetts. He married his cousin, Abigail Montague, on 4 March 1756. She was born on 18 February 1733 in Granby, Hampshire county, Massanchusetts, the daughter of Luke Montague and Hannah Dickinson. He died on 11 July 1810 in South Hadley, Massachusetts.

Josiah's children were,
(21) Luke Montague (1757)
(21) Lucretia Montague, b. 9 Janaury 1759, m. Waitsill Dickinson, d. 6 October 1837
(21) Abigail Montague, b. 14 April 1761, m. Ivory Dewitt 1779, d. 12 March 1842
(21) Lovice Montague, b. 18 March 1763, m. Joseph Dewitt 6 August 1789
(21) Beulah Montague, b. 2 January 1768
(21) Hannah Montague, b. 8 August 1770
(21) Giles Montague (1774)

(21) Luke Montague (1757)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Josiah Montague (1727)

He was born on 20 June 1757. He was drafted in the War of 1812, but procured a substitute. He married Mary Lamphere on25 December 1792. She was born on 14 August 1765. He ws one of the first settlers of Granby, New York, arriving in about 1800. He died on 18 February 1840 in Granby, New York.

Luke's children were,
(22) Orrin Montague, b. 15 December 1793, d. 19 December 1824
(22) Julius Montague, b. 28 August 1795, d. 13 September 1853
(22) Adonijah Warren Montague, b. 13 September 1797, d. 24 June 1875
(22) Abigail Montague, b. 31 August 1801, d. 31 July 1893
(22) Erastus Clark Montague, b. 6 April 1806, d. unkown in California

(21) Giles Montague (1774)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690) (20) Josiah Montague (1727)

He was born on 20 May 1774 in Granby, Massachusetts. He married Rachel, the daughter of John Preston and Rachel Clark, on 27 November 1800. He died on 3 October 1817 in Granby, Massachusetts at the age of 43. Rachel was still alive in the census of Granby in 1850.

His children were,
(22) Theodore Langdon Montague (1801-1880)
(22) Giles Franklin Montague (1803-1875)
(22) Hannah Sophia Montague (1806-1880)
(22) Holland Montague (1808-1884)
(22) Josiah Montague (1811-1843)
(22) William Elliott Montague (1813)
(22) Rachel Maria Montague (1816)

(22) Giles Franklin Montague (1803)

Giles F., the son of Giles Montague and Rachel Switch [Preston], was born on 28 October 1803 in Granby, Massachusetts. Might Rachel have been married before, so having both the surname of Preston and Switch?

He married Elvira E. Edwards on 28 November 1827 in Northampton, Massachusetts. In the 1830 census of South Hadley, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Giles F. Montague. In the 1840 census of Granby, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Giles F. Montague.

In the 1850 census of Granby, Hampshire county, Massachusetts as Granby S. [garbled] Montague, a 46 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Alvira E., 42, and children, Giles R., 19, Ellen, 16, Hannah S., 13, and Mary Jane, 8.

He died on 27 December 1875 in Granby, Massachusetts at the age of 72.

Their children were,
(23) Giles Rollin Montague (1830-1914)
- He was born in 1830 in Granby, Massachusetts, died in La Crosse, Wisconsin in 1914 and was buried in the Oak Grove Cemetery in La Crosse. Giles Rollin Montague (only son of the marriage of his father Giles Franklin Montague with Rachel Preston) married Jennette Warner of Williamsburg, Massachusetts. Giles Rollin may have been one of the first Hadley-origin Montagues who “went dWest” to the newly formed U.S. State of Wisconsin. He settled in La Crosse in the spring of 1854. Both Giles Rollin and his wife Jennette Warner attended the Montague Family Meeting in Hadley in August, 1882. To do so, they travelled “back East” from La Crosse. It must have been quite a trip! He became one of the leading citizens of La Crosse and helped to found, among other things, the National Bank of La Crosse, as well as other business interests in western Wisconsin.
-- (24) Wallace Rollin Montague (1866), second son, born 1866 in La Crosse, Wisconsin, died 1919 in La Crosse. -- (25) Theodore Giles Montague (1899), second son, born 1899 in La Crosse, Wisconsin, died 1967 in Greenwich, Connecticut.

(23) Ellen Elvira Montague (1833-1901)
(23) Hannah Sophia Montague (1837)
(23) Mary Jane Montague (1842-1862)

(22) Holland E. Montague (1808)

The son of Giles Montague and Rachel Preston, he was born in about 1808. In the 1850 census of Granby he was living next door to his brother, Giles. He died on 25 November 1884 in Granby, Massachusetts at the age of 76.

(20) Adonijah Montague (1732)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Peter Montague (1690)

He was born in 1732 in South Hadley. He died in 1754, Amh (Amherst?), only 22 years old. He never married.

Adonijah

Meaning: My Lord is Jehovah. In the Bible, the fourth son of David.


(19) William Montague (1692)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655)

He was born on 16 December 1692 in Hadley. He married Sarah Eastman on 24 January 1716. She was born on 11 October 1694, the daughter of Timothy Eastman. She died on 29 September 1747. He later married Sarah Smith on 5 January 1749. She was the daughter of Deacon John Smith and the widow of Samuel Kellogg. He settled in Granby Centre. William died on 22 December 1767 in South Hadley at the age of 75. His children were,
(20) Sarah Montague, b. 26 October 1717, m. John Stanley of Killingworth, Connecticut
(20) William Montague, b. 9 April 1720, d. 19 October 1745
(20) John Montague, b. 14 September 1723, a Canadian soldier, d. 6 October 1746 - this may refer to service in Canada during the war with France and capture of Louisbourg
(20) Joseph Montague, b. 31 December 1725, d. 10 August 1786, m. 21 March 1752/3 Sarah Henry
(20) Hannah Montague, b. 16 March 1729, d. 5 November 1745
(20) Timothy Montague, b. 23 February 1732, d. 1 February 1800, m. Mindwell Chapin.

(19) Deacon Samuel Montague (1695)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655)

He was born on 2 April 1695 in Hadley. Referred to as a Captain [in the milita?] and a Deacon. One of the forty settlers of Sunderland, Massachusetts [town-founding seems to have been a Montague habit]. He was always a leader there in war and in peace. He was many times a selectman. He was a man of character and influence. He was a member of that somewhat famous ecclesiastical council held, 1750, in Northampton, which resulted in the dismissal of Reverend Jonathan Edwards.

He first married Elizabeth White on 24 January 1718, probably in Hadley. He then married Mary Root on 13 June 1754, either in Hampshire or Franklin county, Massachuseets. She was the daughter of Joseph Root and the widow of Jonathan Billings. Samuel died on 31 January 1779 [tombstone shows 1789] in Sunderland, Franklin county, Massachusetts. Sunderland is a village near Hadley. His home was Lot 14, still in possession of his descendents. Mary Root Montague died on 17 December 1798 in Sunderland.

Samuel's sons were,
(20) Samuel Montague (1720)
(20) John Montague, b. 10 Jan 1723, d. 15 Feb 1748 unmarried
(20) Daniel Montague, b. 13 Jan 1725, m. Lydia Smith
(20) Giles Montague, b. 20 Jan 1727, d. 1732
(20) Major Richard Montague (1729)
(20) Captain Caleb Montague (1731)
(20) Giles Montague, b. 16 December 1733, d. 10 September 1734
(20) Elizabeth Montague, b. 18 September 1735, d. 1743
(20) Nathaniel Montgue, b. 13 February 1739, slain in battle at Lake George, 7 August 1757, this was during the French & Indian War
(20) Ebenezer Montague, b. 1 October 1741, d. 26 September 1743

(20) Samuel Montague (1720)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695)

He was born on 30 June 1720 in Sunderland. Samuel married his cousin, Elizabeth Montague, the daughter of Peter Montague and Mary Hubbard, on 12 Jul 1742 in Bennington, Benton, Vermont. Elizabeth Montague was born on 13 November 1720 and died on 31 January 1816 in Pittsford, Rutland, Vermont.

Samuel probably settled at the Plumtrees. He was one of a number of "Sepraratists" who were excommunicated from the Sunderland church for non-conformity on 24 August 1753. He removed in about 1761 to Bennington, Vermont, helping found the town, assisted in the organization of the First Church and was Selectman and Moderator of the first town meeting. Bennington is in the southwest corner of the state, near the Hudson river.

Samuel then removed to Pittsford, Vermont where he worked at his trade as a weaver. He lived there until the outbreak of the Revolution, when, on account of the exposed condition of that frontier town, he returned to Bennington. He died on 17 January 1777 in Bennington, Benton county, Vermont.

Samuel's children were,
(21) Samuel Montague (15 January 1743 - 27 February 1826)
(21) Elizabeth Montague
(21) Mary Montague
(21) Martha Montague
(21) Persis Montague
(21) Azubah Montague
(21) Experience Montague
(21) Adonijah Montague (17 April 1757 - 8 October 1828; this is the Adonijah, below, of Pawlet, Vermont. He was in Montgomery's campaign to capture Quebec and in the battle of Bennington, Vermont.)
(21) Nathaniel Montague (4 Jun 1759 - about 1846) (21) Rufus Montague (28 October 1762 - 14 June 1834; he was at the battle of Bennington at the age of 15).

(20) Major Richard Montague (1729)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695)

He was born, the fifth son, on 7 May 1729 in Sunderland, Franklin county, Massachusetts in the homestead of Deacon Montague. Richard was a farmer and owned a considerable estate. He married Lucy Cooley on 23 May 1750 in Sunderland, Franklin county, Massachusetts. Lucy Cooley was born on 23 September 1731 in Sunderland, Franklin, Massachusetts.

They lived on Lot No. 20, East side (a house long occupied by Hubbard Graves) in Sunderland, where his first child was born. He soon removed to Lot No. 13, West side, now William Gaylord's home. This is now the site of 69, 71 and 75 South Main Street.

In 1765 he moved to that part of town since incorporated as North Leverett. His homestead stood in sight of the little cemetery where he was buried and was located on the road which extends from the village of North Leverett to the Long Plain road to the town of Montague.

Ricard appears to have been a Baptist, a relatively new religion that was not necessarily "respectable." It would be interesting to know when Richard converted or whether this conversion occurred earlier in the families' history. It might explain some of their wanderings. I suspect his father, the Deacon, was also a Baptist.

The Baptists

The reaction for a demand for conformity by political and religious forces in England produced a group known as the “Separatists.” The principles behind this movement were the freedom of the Church from State rule, pure doctrine rather than a watered-down or compromising doctrine, and overall reform of the Church. The Separatists took the Bible seriously and they were determined to order their lives by its teachings. They stressed that the Church was only for those who were the redeemed, not a body of politically-minded upstarts. They refused to believe that the Bible taught a hierarchical church government (rule from top down), instead calling for a church government that had some form of participation from the people (rule from the grass levels). They preferred a simple worship liturgy which emphasized a Holy God. They felt that the state forms and written aids of the Church of England led to the people’s focusing on the forms and not the Sovereign God; thus these types of “aids” were looked down upon. It was out of this call for purity in the Church, both in worship and everyday practice, that “the Baptist denomination”, as it is known today, emerged by way of the English Separatist movement.

The first Baptist church in England was founded in 1611. The first Baptist church in America was founded by Roger Williams in 1638 in Providence, Rhode Island.

Richard was a man of energy, activity and shrewdness. He was the town clerk for many years and for several years teacher of the town school. He he was chiefly instrumental in the founding of the Baptist church in North Leverett. The church often met at his house and the first minister was ordained in his barn. Whenever the congregation was without a preacher he would act as exhorter. At this time laws had been passed exempting Baptists from paying taxes toward the support of the town's Congregationalist churches, but the Leverett church, on account of technicalities, was unable to obtain its rights. Several of its members had property seized on this account and Richard Montague was taken by a constable six miles toward the county jail and kept over night, when the officer returned and took a fine hog from the Major's pen, which he sold to satisfy the demand.

Richard saw much service in the French and Indian wars. He was a member of Roger's expedition to St. Francis, and at Crown Point, in 1759.

"The oldest house in North Leverett," writes a correspondent in 1873, "has just been taken down, It was built by Capt. Sparrow in 1748,--125 years ago. Many of the timbers were found perfectly sound. It was for many years the residence of Major Richard Montague of Revolutionary fame, and one of Ethan Allen's assistants in the taking of For Ticonderoga, and subsequently for many years the headquarters of the few Baptists in those parts, then suffering under the intolerance of the unjust religious laws. The major had a stentorian voice; and, it was said, could read so that a whole brigade could hear. One could easily believe that the timbers of this old house rang as the Major thundered forth his indignation against religious intolerance, especially just after he had on one occasion been arrested, and conveyed six miles towards jail; when the constable, thinking of a surer way, left him, and levied upon, and sold, a fat pig to pay the obnoxious 'minister tax.'"
- (Source: Nason, Elias, 1811-1887. A gazetteer of the state of Massachusetts : with numerous illustrations on wood and steel / by Elias Nason. -- Boston : B.B. Russell, 1874. -- p. 293).

Major Roger's Expedition

The colonies were generally encouraged by the military operations of 1758. Louisburg had been taken and the English had also secured Fort Frontenac and destroyed Fort DuQuesne on the Ohio river, where the city of Pittsburgh now stands. The plan for the succeeding campaign season was for General Wolf to assault Quebec, which he eventually took, and for General Amherst, with troops fresh from the victory at Louisbourg and a local militia raised in Massachusetts, to assault the French at Fort Ticonderoga and Crown Point on the upper Hudson river. After a vigorous siege by Amherst's men, the French, at the final extremis, blew up the fort at Ticonderoga and abandoned their position upriver at Crown Point, and retired to the fortified village of St. Francis on the northern shore of Lake Champlain.

Major Robert Rogers, a distinquished partisan, was selected for the assault on St. Francis with his troop of Rangers and an attachment of regular troops. Because the British had found fighting in the near wilderness of America difficult for their massed troops, they had authorized provincials, like Rogers, to raise local militia units who understood the backwoods and the Indian manner of fighting. The Rangers wore distinctive green outfits and practiced tactics called "Rogers' Rules of Ranging," which the British considered unconventional and ungentlemanly. Rogers trained his men in small unit tactics and provided extensive musket target practice (which the regular Crown command considered a waste of ammunition). His military tactics were so bold and effective that his unit became the Crown forces' chief scouting unit in the late 1750's.

After a difficult march and many setbacks, Rogers' force arrived at St. Francis and found the enemy completely ignorant of their presence and unprepared to resist an assault. The result was a massacre. The exploits of Rogers Rangers are told in Kenneth Rogers novel "Northwest Passage." Spencer Tracy played the part of Robert Rogers in the film version.

Later, in 1775, Richard served as an 'adjutant' of Minute Men at the Lexington Alarm. After the news of the battle of Lexington, he renounced allegiance to Great Britain, saying to his wife that if god would forgive him for having fought seven years for the king he would fight for the rest of his days against him or until he was conquered. I assume this means that while he was mustered for the Alarm, he was not at Lexington itself. Perhaps he was with one of the militia units that dogged the British retreat back to Boston.

From "Masachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution," Volume 10, page 885:

"Montague, Richard, Leverett. Adjutant, Col. Ruggles Woodbridge's regt. of Minute-men; entered service April 20, 1775; service, 7 days; also, Col. R. Woodbridge's (25th) regt.; engaged April 27, 1775; service, 3 mos. 12 days; also, same regt.; list of men returned as serving on picket guard, dated May 23, 1775; also, order of the day, dated June 4, 1775; said Montague reported as Adjutant of the day for "tomorrow."

The Lexington Alarm

The first shots of the American Revolution occurred in Massachusetts on 19 April 1775. By the early spring of 1775, Lieutenant General Thomas Gage, commander in chief of British forces in North American and Royal Governor of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, found his authority effectively limited to the reach of his Boston-based troops in a province seething with rebellious activity. On April 19, 1775, he dispatched a picked force of elite light infantry and grenadiers from Boston to Cambridge to seize gunpowder and weapons the colonists were collecting there. The operation was planned as a surprise raid, but Boston Patriots discovered it almost immediately and dispatched express riders, including the celebrated Paul Revere, galloping off in all directions to raise the alarm and call out the militia.

When the Redcoats reached Lexington, they found the local militia company drawn up on the village common. Someone unknown to history fired a shot and the British responded by dispersing the militia with a single volley and a bayonet charge, killing 8 militiamen and wounding 9 more. A short time later, at Concord, several militia companies confronted the British at North Bridge and, firing the "shot heard 'round the world", repulsed them. Responding to what became known as the "Lexington Alarm", more militia companies poured in from surrounding towns, and the British, finding themselves heavily outnumbered by an armed and thoroughly aroused populace, promptly countermarched to Boston. All along their route they were harassed by militiamen, firing into their flanks and rear. By the time they reached the security of their Boston enclave, they had suffered the loss of 73 officers and men killed, 174 wounded, and 26 missing.

From the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol.12: "Richard Montague was . . . with Ethan Allen at Ticonderoga."

The Battle of Ticonderoga

Fort Ticonderoga is about 100 miles north of Albany, New York and is between Lake George and Lake Champlain. The Continental Army's interest in capturing the fort was to have control of the waterways from Canada. There were many British soldiers in Canada and having control of the fort would mean having control of the waterways the British could use in attacking the Colonists. Colonel Samuel Parson left Cambridge, Massachusetts on 19 April 1775, the same day as the battles at Lexington and Concord, to go to Connecticut. He wanted to recruit men for the siege of Boston. He realized that the Continental Army did not have enough cannon or artillery. Then he met Benedict Arnold, who told him that there were plenty of cannon at Fort Ticonderoga. Benedict Arnold had heard that the fort was run-down and not well protected. Benedict Arnold went on to Cambridge and urged the Committee of Safety to allow him to seize the fort. The Committee agreed, but Benedict Arnold could only take 400 men from Massachusetts. Colonel Parson then met up with John Brown and Colonel James Easton were leading forty men to Castleton, Vermont. They traveled together and met Ethan Allen, who had also recognized the importance of the fort, and his Green Mountain Boys, who were also marching to capture the fort at Ticonderoga.

Now there were two different armies marching toward Ticonderoga. Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold met at Castleton and marched together. Both men wanted to be in charge. Benedict Arnold had the commission papers from the Committee of Safety, but Ethan Allen had the men. Finally, they decided to march side by side. In the early morning hours of May 10, 1775, in the first offensive action of the war, the 175 Green Mountain Boys of Vermont led by Benedict Arnold and Ethan Allen walked through the open gate at Fort Ticonderoga. When a sleeping sentry awoke, Ethan Allen hit him on the side of his head and took his weapons. The sentry motioned to the upstairs and the men climbed the stairs. All eighty-three British soldiers and two officers, Captain William Delaplace and Lieutenant Jocelyn Feltham, were all asleep. It was an easy victory for the Continental Army and there were no shots fired.

Seth Warner, a Green Mountain Boy, was sent with some men to capture Fort Crown Point which sat on the southern tip of Lake Champlain. Both forts were under the control of the Continental Army.

Benedict Arnold and Ethan Allen were both ordered to take their men back to Boston with all 100 cannons. The cannons were difficult to transport, and they did not arrive in Boston until January 1776, too late for the Battle of Bunker Hill.

Later, Congress realized the important locations of these forts and sent a thousand men to guard these posts. The colonists kept control of Fort Ticonderoga until July 5, 1777 when British forces led by General Burgoyne captured the fort. Fort Ticonderoga was set on fire by the British forces and in 1909 was restored and turned into a museum that is still open today for visitors.

After Ticonderoga Richard remained in the thick of things. According to the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol.9, page 112: "Richard Montague raised a company [of which he was Captain] and fought at Bunker Hill." Clearly he went ahead and was not amongst the group that brought Ticonderoga's cannon to Boston.

The Battle of Bunker Hill

"The story of the Bunker Hill battle is a tale of great blunders heroically redeemed." The first blunder was the decision of the Massachusetts Committee of Safety to fortify Charlestown heights and attempt to hold it against the British, who were cooped up in Boston after their withdrawal from Lexington and Concord. The ultimate aim was sensible enough, to tighten the encirclement of Boston by commanding the heights both north and south of the town, Dorchester as well as Charlestown, and to deny those commanding hills to the British. But in fact the Americans did not have guns capable of reaching Boston effectively from Bunker Hill. In addition, forces installed there were almost certain to be cut off since the British warships controlled Boston harbor and its confluence with the Charles River and could easily keep the slim neck that joined Charlestown to the mainland under heavy fire. Nor, once committed, did the American commanders choose their ground wisely. The high point of the mile-long Charlestown peninsula was Bunker Hill. It rose 110 feet and adjoined the only route of retreat, the roadway back to Cambridge. However, the spot chosen for fortification was not Bunker Hill but Breed's Hill, only 75 feet high and 600 yards farther from the neck, controllable from the higher ground at its rear and isolated from the sole route of retreat. Even in the best position the ill-equipped, altogether untrained troops of the New England army could hardly be expected to hold out against sustained attacks by British regulars led by no less that four general officers experienced in warfare on two continents. That for two and a half hours of intense battle, greatly outnumbered, they did just that, held out until their powder gone and forced to fight with gun butts and rocks, they were bayoneted out of the stifling, dust-choked redoubt they had thrown up on Breed's Hill, was the result not only of great personal heroism but also of the blunders of the British. In complete control of the sea, they could have landed troops on the north side of Charlestown neck and struck the rebels in the rear while sending their main force against them face-on. But in an excess of caution they chose instead to land at the tip and march straight up against the fortified American lines. Such strategy as they had was confined to sending a single column along the thin strip of beach on the north shore of Charlestown peninsula hoping to reach the rear of the entrenchments by land and thus begin an overland encirclement. But this effort was doomed from the start. A delay in beginning the attack gave the Americans time to throw a barrier across the beach and to place behind it a company of New Hampshire riflemen capable of stopping the encircling column. The British attack therefore was altogether a frontal one, two ranks moving on a front almost half-a-mile long toward the set battle line, a line formed on the Boston Bay side by the deserted houses of Charlestown, the redoubt on Breed's Hill, its breastwork extension and a fortified rail fence, and completed on the far beach by the New Hampshiremen and their barricade.

No one of the thousands who crowded the housetops, church steeples, and shore batteries of Boston to watch the spectacle ever forgot the extraordinary scene they witnessed. 17 June 1775 was an absolutely still, brilliantly clear summer's day. Viewers in Boston only half a mile away could make out the stages of the battle clearly. The first assault was begun by the column of light infantry on the far beach, the American left flank, and was followed by the cannonading of Charlestown on the right flank, which set the town in flames; then came the slow forward movement of the main battle line: two ranks of scarlet-clad grenadiers and light infantrymen, almost 2,000 in all, marching in full kit across irregular fields of knee-deep grass broken by fences and low stone walls. The American troops, no more than 1, 500 men at any time, at the end only half that, held their fire until the first British line was within 150 feet of the barricades; when they fired it was almost at point-blank range, and the result was slaughter. The British front line collapsed in heaps of dead and wounded, "as thick as sheep in a field." General Howe's entire staff was wiped out in the main attack against the rail fence. Great gaps appeared in the once parade-perfect ranks, and the survivors spun back.

The British, however, were professional soldiers, led by experienced and determined officers with reputations to make. They quickly regrouped for the second attack, directed now squarely at the redoubt and breastwork. Again the Americans withheld fire until the last moment, and again when it came it tore the line of upright marching men to shreds. "An incessant stream of fire poured from the rebel lines," a British officer wrote, "it seemed a continued sheet of fire for near thirty minutes." The forward units fell back against the second line moving up, then turned and fled back down the hill. Some of Howe's remaining officers begged him then to break off the attack and review the situation. Instead, he called for reinforcements, ordered his troops to throw off their heavy equipment, stationed his artillery where it could rake the whole American line, and called for a third assault, a bayonet charge against the central barricades. Again the advancing line was thrown back by the defenders' fire, and again great gaps were torn in the marching ranks. But this time the fire was less intense and it could not be sustained. The 700 exhausted defenders had been sent no reinforcements; they had no supplies except what they had carried with them the night before. As the third charge neared the line of fortification their powder ran out, and though they fought desperately with everything they could lay hands on, they could no longer force the British back. Grenadiers and light infantrymen poured over the parapets and through the thin barricades, and dove into groups of defenders. The Americans turned and fled up over and around Bunker Hill to the roads that led to safety.

Heroes on both sides redeemed, perhaps, the blunders. The American hero was above all William Prescott, in command in the redoubt, whose nerve held throughout, who steeled the small band of armed farmers, and somehow made them into an effective fighting force. Miraculously, he survived, though Joseph Warren, physician, orator, liberal spokesman, writer, who had been appointed major general but who chose to fight as a private soldier in the redoubt, was killed in the final charge. A half dozen others, John Stark, Henry Dearborn, Seth Pomeroy, and Andrew McClary, would be remembered for their valor and leadership. The commanding officer throughout the engagement, Israel Putnam, though his original battle plan had been ill-conceived, though he failed to resupply or reinforce the defenders at the barricades, though indeed he was unable to induce the hundreds of men who watched the action from Bunker Hill and from the roadways a mere 1,000 yards from the battle to come to the aid of the defenders, "Old Put" too would be honored in the end.

For generals William Howe, Henry Clinton, and John Burgoyne the battle was an introduction to years of frustration and defeat in the American war. Howe's personal courage had been clearly demonstrated but so too had his excessive caution, his inflexible commitment to formal battle tactics, and his entire lack of a killer instinct, which would have impelled him forward to overtake the fleeing Americans and to assault the weakly held American headquarters in Cambridge. Clinton too, hastily mobilizing reinforcements and charging with them in the third assault, had shown decision and courage, and his initial proposals for encircling the peninsula by sea had been the soundest strategy of the day. But his voice was not decisive, and his role was secondary throughout. As for Burgoyne, playwright, politician, man of style and spirit, "Gentleman Johnny" Burgoyne had watched the battle from the Boston battery and wrote descriptions of it, memorable in themselves, that suggest something of the mentality that would account for the strategy and failure of Saratoga.

Half of the British forces had been casualties, perhaps a third of the 1,500 Americans engaged had been killed, wounded, or captured. What did the battle prove? It proved that raw, untrained American troops could fight, and fight well, but only if they had to. That success would come to the British only if they responded flexibly and imaginatively to the unorthodox demands of warfare in colonial territories 3,000 miles from home, and finally, that if the still disunited, still legally British states of America were to fight with any hope of success a continental war against the greatest military power on earth, a leader of great personal force and of great military and political skill would have to be forthcoming.

After Bunker Hill Richard retired with the rest of the army to Cambridge and was there when Washington took command. He was promoted by the General to the rank of major, made an adjutant, and attached to Washington's staff.

The Campaign After Bunker Hill

After an overland journey from Philadelphia that partook of the nature of an ovation, Washington arrived in Cambridge two weeks after the Bunker Hill Battle and formally assumed command of the Continental army. He immediately instituted a rigorous training program to turn the volunteer militia men into an professional army. Many of his staff complained of the delay, but Washington was convinced that in no other way would the Americans be able to stand up to the British regulars.

By the 1 March, 1776 a great many of the cannon captured at Ticonderoga the year before had finally arrived in Cambridge. Washington determined to wait no longer. On the night of 4 March he sent two thousand men to fortify the peninsula south of Boston, known as Dorchester Heights, which commanded the city and harbor even better than did Bunker Hill. General Howe determined to storm the works, but his men remembered Bunker Hill, and the memory left them spiritless. In the end, the British, outmanuevered, their positions exposed and shipping in the harbor open to bombardment, decided to abandon Boston. At right General Howe embarks his troops in Boston Harbor. This was Washington's first stroke in the war and it was one of his best. With little loss he had cleared New England of the enemy and had sent a thrill of joy over the whole country. In their haste to depart the British left behind more than two hundred cannon and great quantities of muskets and ammunition, all of which became the property of Washington's army. Furthermore, the news of Howe's departure did not reach England for several weeks. In the meantime vessels were being sent to Boston to supply Howe's army. They sailed innocently into the harbor, and were captured, and their contents went to increase the stores of the Continental army.

There is still preserved a powder horn most eleborately carved by him while he was a private soldier. The horn was worn by him, or other members of the family, in the Battle of Bunker Hill and in the other principal battles of the Northern division of the Revolutionary army. At the present time the strap attached to it is the original one worn with the horn, and bears the regimental colors of the Continental Army. A diary, still perfect, from Aug. 1 to Dec. 1, 1775 was kept by the Major while at Cambridge and is filled with interesting military details. He was often sent to Western Massachusetts, his homeland, as a recruiting officer and on these occasions the people noted "his fine martial bearing, how well he managed his men, and how elegantly he rode his horse."

He was also a member of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress during the Revolution.

Richard died on 21 February 1794 in North Leverett, Franklin county. His death, said Reverend Baxter Newton, was a heavy stroke to the church, but in all Baptist churches in this section of the State, and although eighty years have passed since he died, the name of Major Richard Montague is a household word in every ancient Baptist family. The naming of his children, if nothing else, illustrates his religious bent. He was buried by the side of his wife in the little burying ground adjoining his farm in North Leverett. The inscription on his tombstone reads,

"Traveler behold as you pass by,
As you are now, so once was I,
As I am now, so you must be,
Prepare for death and follow me."

He was buried in the small burial ground near and joining his farm in North Leverett. New England's greatest statesman, Daniel Webster, is said to have been maternally a Hadley Montague. Lucy, his wife, died on 23 May 1795 in North Leverett, Franklin, Massachusetts

Richard's children were,
(21) Uriel Montague (1756)
(21) Oreb Montague (1758)
(21) Nathaniel Montague (1761)
(21) Moses Montague (1763)
(21) Luke Montague (1766)
(21) Moses Montague (1767)
(21) Elijah Montague (1768)

(21) Uriel Montague (1756)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695) (20) Richard Montague (1729)

He was born on 30 September 1756 in Sunderland. He probably served during the revolutionary war, including at the battle of Saratoga.

Uriel Montague. Additional military information: Private, Capt. Reuben Dickenson's co. of Minute-men, Col. R. Woodbridge's regt., marched on alarm of 19 Apr 1775 for 11 days; also, Capt. Reuben Dickinson's co., Col. Woodbridge's regt.; at Charlestown, 27 Jul 1775; from 1 May 1775 for 3 mos. 8 days; also, Sergeant Major, Capt. Elihu Lyman's co., Col. Elisha Porter's (Hampshire Co.) regt.; from 25 Jul to 2 Sep 1779; at New London, Conn.
After the war he was a physician and settled in Southboro, where he was town clerk as long as he remained there. He removed in 1798 to New Hartford, New York and had a large practice in several towns in Oneida county, New York. He died in June 1812 in New Hartford, Oneida county, New York.

(21) Oreb Montague (1758)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695) (20) Richard Montague (1729)

He was born on 28 October 1758 in North Leverett. He married Lydia Griffin. After the birth of his eldest four children he removed to Cazenovia, New York, where his remaining children were born and where he died. He served five years in the Revolutionary war and was at West Point when Andre [?] was captured. He died on 18 January 1825 in Caxenovia, Madison county, New York. There is a nice biography online at the Rootswebs Madison county site for another of Oreb's children, Linus b: 22 Jul, 1799 in Cazenovia. Lydia died in Jul 1823 in Cazenovia, Madison, New York.

(21) Nathaniel Montague (1761)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695) (20) Richard Montague (1729)

He was aide to his father in the Revolutionary War and was a ruling elder in the Presbyterian church. Nathaniel married Eleanor Miner on 1 Jan 1786. Eleanor was born on 9 Jun 1764 and died on 18 Mar 1839 in New Hartford, Oneida, New York.

(21) Moses Montague (1763)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695) (20) Richard Montague (1729)

(21) Luke Montague (1766)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695) (20) Richard Montague (1729)

He was a merchant in Amherst, Massachusetts. His homestead is still owned by his descendants and is the next dwelling beyond the town hall, on Main Street. His store adjoined his home. Luke married Irene Dickinson on 15 Nov 1798. Irene Dickinson was born on 31 Dec 1770 and died on 5 May 1849.

(21) Moses Montague (1767)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695) (20) Richard Montague (1729)

(21) Elijah Montague (1768)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695) (20) Richard Montague (1729)

He was born on 26 November 1768 [1765?] in North Leverett, Massachusetts. From Elijah Montague,

"He was licensed to preach in 1797 and in 1798 was ordained pastor of the Baptist church at North Leverett, which relation continued 28 years, during which time he baptized 250 persons. Three time during these 28 years he went into the then wilds of New York and Pennsylvania on missionary tours, and on one of these occasions traveled over 1000 miles on horseback, in the winter, preaching wherever he could find an audience. A son used to say the he could always tell when his father was going to preach a rousing sermon by the work flew; which illustrates his method of study. With his pen he worked at disadvantage. That his early opportunities for learning had been meagre, was ever cause for regret, but with his Bible he was perfectly familiar and his preaching was of the sort that found its way to the hearts and consciences of his hearers."
Elijah married Lovina Jones on 21 June 1791. Lovina was born on 25 February 1773 and died on 12 April 1804. Elijah then married Jerusha Woodbury on 23 April 1805. Jerusha was born on 17 Apr 1778, the daughter of Jeremiah Woodbury.

Elijah died on 26 September 1841 and was buried, next to his first wife, in North Leverett. From his tombstone,

“His life was not distinguished, By fading honors of the world; But by his warm and ardent zeal, For Jesus and his word.”
Jerusha died on 5 December 1849 and was buried on the other side of Elijah. His line is Hibbard (1801), then Albert (1845), both buried in or near Orchard Park, New York. Chester (1875) follows, who is listed in the "Montague Book." This line of the family ended up in California with a Richard Montague, still living.

Elijah's children with Lovina Jones were,
(22) Emeline Montague, b. 5 July 1792, m. Judah Wright 6 April 1812, d. 26 September 1818
(22) Sophia Montague, b. 21 September 1794, d. 9 March 1798
(22) Polly Montague, b. 7 March 1796, m. Otis Moore 23 November 1815, d. 2 January 1877
(22) Minerva Montague, b. 22 November 1797, m. John G. Curtiss 2 December 1819, d. 27 December 1871
(22) Elijah Montgue, b. 20 August 1799, m. 1st Emily Hemenway, 2nd Theodosia Rowe 19 March 1927, d. 4 October 1880
(22) Hibbard Montague, b. 18 November 1801, m. Mary Cowden, d. 21 April 1846
(22) Simeon Montague, b. 9 October 1803, m. 1st Phebe A. Rabblee, 2nd Sibyl Leland 15 October 1826, "Removed to Michigan 1837, was elected town clerk at the first town meeting in Springport, Montague Lake, near that town was named for him. He was inventor of the first machine made for sewing boots and shoes."

Elijah's children with Jerusha Woodbury were,
(22) Levi Montague, b. 19 February 1806, d. 20 February 1806
(22) Jonathon Armory Montague, b. 7 March 1807, d. October 1832, "Removed to Canada; is said to have been drowned while fishing."
(22) Unknown son Montague, b. 25 July 1808, d. 25 July 1808
(22) Isaac Woodbury Montague, b. 23 July 1809, m. Hannah Stevens 16 January 1832
(22) Richard Montague, b. 4 April 1811, m. Lovina Newton 1833, d. 8 May 1875
(22) Nathaniel Montague, b. 8 February 1813, d. 5 April 1814
(22) Thomas B. Montgue, b. 16 July 1815, m. Clarrissa S. Coleman [son Thomas Coleman Montgue, b. 29 October 1843]
(22) Uriel Montague, b. 1 October 1817, m. Jane Stevens [sister of Hannah?]
(22) Benjamin Montague (1821)

(22) Benjamin Montague (1821)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695) (20) Richard Montague (1729) (21) Elijah Montague (1765)

He was born on 17 May 1821 in North Leverett, Massachuseets. He married Mary A. Newton. She was perhaps the sister of Richard Montague's wife, Lovina Newton. Benjamin died on 9 August 1862 at the Battle of Cedar Mountain in Virginia.

Battle at Cedar Mountain

On August 9, General Thomas J. 'Stonewall' Jackson and General Nathaniel Banks’s Union corps clashed at Cedar Mountain, in Culpepper county, Virginia. The Union gained an early advantage over the numerically superior Confederate forces, but a counterattack led by A.P. Hill repulsed the Union troops. The Federals suffered over 2,400 casualties to the Confederates 1,300. This battle was the opening salvo of the Second Manassas, Bullrun, Campaign.


(20) Captain Caleb Montague (1731)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695)

He was born on 27 July 1731 in Sunderland, Franklin county, Massachusetts. He married Eunice Root on 30 October 1751. He was a Captain in the Revolutionary war and served alongside his cousin, Moses Montague. He commanded a company in the 6th Massachusetts regiment under Colonel Williams [however, I show this to be Ichabod Alden's regiment]. I believe this unit was in the expedition to Bennington, Vermont, in the Northern department, in August 1777 with Moses Montague's company.

The Battle of Bennington

The British plan in 1777 was to split the colonies along the Hudson river valley, leaving the more contentious New England colonies isolated. General John Burgoyne brought a force south while while General Howe was supposed to bring his New York City army north. Unfortunately for the British plans, General Howe took his army by sea to attack and take Philadelphia. This left Burgoyne isolated and helped bring about his disastrous defeat at Saratoga.

Enroute to Saratoga, and short of supplies, Burgoyne ordered his German troops, led by Colonel Friedrich Baum, to capture the American storehouses in Bennington, Vermont. Aware of his intentions, Vermont had already sent out a call for help. The American force, comprised of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts militia's, interdicted the raid.

"The raiders met and drove off a rebel scouting party at Sancoicks Mills on August 14. After dispatching a request for reinforcements, Baum advanced four miles to a hill overlooking the Walloomsac River. Only five miles from Bennington, Baum's men entrenched on and around this hill, awaiting further American resistance. After a day of rain, Stark decided on August 16 to send two columns of his troops against Baum's flanks and rear while the remainder assaulted the front. The attack began at 3:00 pm. Many Indians, Canadians and Tories fled or surrendered after the first musket volleys, but the unmounted cavalrymen held position, fighting off the attackers with sabres. Baum himself died in the battle, which Stark would later describe as "one continuous clap of thunder," which lasted two hours before the hill was finally taken. Stark's men had barely cheered the victory when news arrived that Lieutenant Colonel Heinrich von Breymann was approaching with the requested reinforcements. Fortunately, Warner's Vermont militia arrived in time to meet this advance. The Vermonters pushed back the Brunswickers and pursued them until sundown. "But had daylight lasted one hour longer," Stark reported later, "we should have taken the whole body of them."

After the war he succeeded to his father's homestead. He was a man of character and influence. His comparatively early death was said to have been due to disease contracted while in the service. He was elected to the office of deacon, which he declined, but he held all of the important civil and military offices of the town. He died on 11 November 1782 in Sunderland. Eunice died on 9 December 1804. His children were,
(21) John Montague (1752)
(21) Eunice Montague, b. 14 September 1754, m. Israel Russell 16 July 1775
(21) David Montague (1757)
(21) Irena Montague, b. 6 March 1759, m. Martin Cooley 9 October 1777, d. 24 July 1784

(21) John Montague (1752)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695) (20) Captain Caleb Montague (1731)

He was born on 12 August 1752 in Sunderland, Franklin county, Massachusetts. He married Abigail Hubbard on 8 October 1777. She was born on 21 July 1756, the daughter of Captain Israel Hubbard and Abigail Smith. He succeeded to his father's homestead and was town clerk for 32 consecutive years and during most of those years was selectman, assessor and treasurer. He was deacon of the church for 27 years and for many years teacher of the town school. He was instrumental in establishing a social library during the last century. His last years were spent living with his son John. Abigail died on 12 March 1796 in Sunderland. John died on 7 November 1832 in Sunderland.

John's children were,
(22) Belinda Montague, b. 11 November 1778, d. 14 December 1842, unmarried
(22) Caleb Montague, b. 7 February 1781, m. Martha Warner 27 March 1809, d. 28 October 1825
(22) Abigail Montague, b. 21 September 1783, m. Jason Stockbridge 26 October 1815, d. 11 December 1860
(22) Fanny Montague, b. 29 July 1786, m. William Hunt 7 March 1805, d. 7 May 1821
(22) Eunice Montague, b. 10 March 1789, m. Ebenezer Ames 15 December 1815, d. 2 September 1880
(22) Mary Montague, b. 31 July 1791, m. Wood Taft 7 August 1817, d. 27 September 1880
(22) Sally Montague, b. 8 December 1793, m. Austin Smith 29 March 1820, d. 1 July 1882
(22) Deacon John Montague, b. 6 March 1796, m. Mary Graves 7 October 1830, d. 29 January 1881

(21) David Montague (1757)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655) (19) Samuel Montague (1695) (20) Captain Caleb Montague (1731)

He was born on 3 March 1757 in Sunderland, Franklin county, Massachusetts. He married Sarah Clark on 23 September 1781. She was born on 19 February 1763. He lived at "Great Swamp" farm. He died on 21 January 1839 in Sunderland. Sarah died on 13 August 1856. David's children were,
(22) Moses Montague, b. 9 June 1782, removed to Stanstead, Canada, where he lived several years, m. 1st Susan Lee 29 September 1808, Stanstead, Canada, (b. 29 January 1787, d. 19 August 1811), returned to Sunderland and lived near his father, 2nd Mary Pomeroy 2 November 1820, d. 18 October 1863, Sunderland, Franklin, Massachusetts
(22) Irena Montague, b. 29 April 1784, m. Rufus Hubbard 29 October 1817
(22) Ira Montague, 7 January 1787, m. 1st Talitha Hubbard 18 October 1815, 2nd Abigail Melenthe Clapp 30 June 1852, d. 5 March 1865
(22) Orlando Montague, b. 11 October 1789, m. Hannah Lord 4 September 1817
(22) Phila Montague, b. 16 March 1793, m. Walter Graves 1814, d. 6 December 1866
(22) Lucy Montague, 25 November 1796, m. Oliver Dickinson 9 March 1847, d. 7 April 1877
(22) Luther Montague, b. 25 November 1796, d. 15 March 1824
(22) Levi Montague, b. 23 August 1803, d. 3 September 1805

(19) Hannah Montague (1697)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655)

She was born on 28 May 1697. She married Josiah Willard.

"A surviving tradition concerning her brings vividly to mind that delusion which so disgraced some parts of Massachusetts, but from which Hadley was so largely free. It was sometimes thought that Hannah was "possessed" that she was indeed a witch. Perhaps she feigned her action in sport, or it may be she was the subject of some nervous disorder. But the story goes that when afflicted she would call on her brother Samuel for help. He would at once arm himself with a great broadsword, enter the room where Hannah was, and when his sister had pointed out the locality of the tormenting spirits - to him invisible - would cut and slash for very life. And then Hannah, - the wicked tease, - noting her brother's troubled air, would say, "No, not there, but there! there!" - Rev. Richard Montague in address at Hadley, 1882.

(19) Lieutenant Luke Montague (1699)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655)

He was born on 4 October 1699 in Hadley. He first married Hannah Dickinson before 9 March 1729. Hannah was born on 30 July 1706 in Hadley and died on 3 September 1765. The Dickinson's were founding members of the town of Hadley. Emily Dickinson, the poet, was part of this family.

Second he married Deborah after 3 September 1765. Luke was styled a Lieutenant. This must have been as part of a militia that took part in the French-Indian Wars. He died on 25 August 1775 in South Hadley, at the age of 75. There is a gravestone in the South Hadley grave yard with the inscription,

"In memory of Lieut. Luke Montague, A worthy Christian, and an ornament to the community in general, who died Aug 23, 1775, in the 76th year of his age."
His children were,
(20) Luke Montague, b. 9 March 1729, d. 18 November 1752
(20) Hannah Montague, b. 5 January 1731, d. 31 August 1773, unmarried
(20) Abigail Montague, b. 18 February 1733, m. 4 March 1756 Josiah Montague, d. 28 August 1833
(20) Giles Montague, b. 28 June 1736, d. 3 May 1738
(20) Mehitable Montague, b. 3 October 1738, m. 3 (23?) December 1756 Israel Clark, d. 23 October 1817
(20) Mary Montague, b. 1 November 1740, m. Titus Pomeroy
(20) Huldah Montague, b. 20 April 1743, m. Samuel Goodman
(20) Miriam Montague, b. 25 January 1745

(19) Nathaniel Montague (1704)
(10) Richard Montacute (11) Edward Montague (1429) (12) Robert Montague (1455) (13) William Montague (1480) (14) Robert Montague (1505) (15) William Montague (1536-48) (16) Peter Montague (1580) (17) Richard Montague (1614) (18) John Montague (c1655)

He was born on 6 October 1704 in Hadley. He married Hannah Ingram on 18 May 1743. She was born on 14 Apr 1711, daughter of Nathaniel Ingram and Esther [Hester] Smith. He died on 16 November 1753 in Hadley. His children were,
(20) Hannah Montague, b. 29 February 1744, m. 15 November 1770 Isaiah Carrier of Belchertown
(20) Nathaniel Montague, b. 26 July 1745, m. 21 October 1773 Sarah Goodrich, d. 4 November 1784
(20) Esther Montague, b. 2 March 1747, m. 21 February 1775 Moses Church
(20) Sarah Montague, b. 21 November 1748, d. 2 or 3 May 1764
(20) Eunice Montgue, b. 25 July 1751, m. 15 February 1780 Joseph Church of New Marlboro
(20) Elizabeth Montague, b. 8 February 1753, m. 23 February 1773 Abner Phillips

Steve Hissem
San Diego, California