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The Levi & John Hissem of Thomas Families

This is the story of the two youngest sons of Thomas Hissom, Levi and John. Both married daughters of Jacob Welker, and both moved west.

(22) Levi Hissem (1802)
(15) Raphe Hesome (c1550) (16) William Hesome (c1577) (17) George Hesom (c1600) (18) John Heesom (1650) (19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750)

Or Levy. With so many of the family sharing the names of Thomas, John, Levi and David, it's often hard to tell which member of the family we're dealing with in any one document, especially when we're discussing Tyler county, West Virginia.

In the 1810 census of Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. Levi was the elder of two sons living with his father, Thomas Hissom.

In the 1820 census of Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania there was a Thomas Hissam, possibly Levi's father, in Hempfield township for this year, though there are no sons listed of the right age to be Levi. Confusingly, there is also a Thomas Hissem of the right age in the 1820 census of Tyler county, West Virginia, where I know Thomas settled at about this time. We do know, however, that Levi remained in Hempfield township, where he later married. Levi may have stayed with his older brother, Abner, when his father moved to Tyler county. Abner remained in Westmoreland county and married Mary, the daughter of Michael Welker. Levi and his younger brother, John, were to marry the daughters of Mary's half-brother, Jacob Welker. This might indicate that the boys lived with Abner for a time, and that Abner's wife had contrived their marriages.

Levi married Mary, "Polly," the daughter of Jacob Welker, of Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, no later than 1825 (there was a daughter aged 5-10 in the 1830 census). He would have been 21 in 1823.

“Mary Welker, b. ----, 180-, in Hempfield Twp.; m. Levi Hissem; removed to the West; there died and left a family of descendants; farmers." - from "History and Genealogy of the Reed Family"
Mary was born in about 1807 in Hempfield township. Note that Levi's brother, John, also married a daughter of Jacob Welker, Elizabeth, moved west and died. See the Welkers webpage for Mary's derivation and her relationship with Abner Hissam's wife, the half-sister of Jacob Welker.

In the 1830 census of Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania as Levi Hissem. In the household are a man 20-30 years old, Levi, who would have been about 28, with a wife 20-30 years old, Mary, and a son under five, Joshua, two daughters under five, including Delila, and one daughter 5-10 years.

The following is from the will of John's father-in-law, Jacob Welker, proved on 11 February 1834 in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania.

"First--I devise my dwelling and plantation unto my son Michael Welker on the following conditions:--By him paying to his sisters and brothers out of the same the following named sums, to-wit: In four months after my decease, he pays the sum of $14.25 to my son John Welker, and in four months after that payment the like sume to my son Samuel; and in four months after that the like sum to my daughter Polly intermarried to Levy Hissom; and in four months after that payment the like sum to my daughter Bessie intermarried with John Hissom . . ."
. . .
Third: . . . I direct my executors to divide the same [my personal estate] into eight equal shares and give and devise two shares thereof to my son John, and one share thereof to my son Samuel, one share to my daughter Polly, and one share to my daughter Betsy, and one share to my daughter Nancy, and one share thereof to my daughter Sophia, and one share thereof to my daughter Catherine, to be paid to them by my executors, after the estate is settled, &c."
As for the nicknames, Elizabeth becomes Betsy or Bessie, but more interestingly, in English nickname usage R becomes L, and M ecomes P; so Mary becomes Molly, and Molly becomes Polly.

Soon after Mary's father died I believe Levi moved the family down the Ohio river to Tyler county, West Virginia. This occurred after 1834, when Levi's son William was born in Pennsylvania and before 1836 when his son Jesse was born in Virginia.

I'm pretty confident that the Levi Hissam we find in Hempfield township was Thomas' son. I'm also confident that the Levi we find in Missouri is the same man. However, Tyler county was too full of Hissam's to be certain which Levi is ours, and which the son of Thomas' brother, David. Levi, the son of David, most often known by the surname Heysham, had been in the 1820 census of Tyler county, the Personal Property Tax List of 1825 and the Poor Levy of 1826.

The following may be for our Levi. Note however that this man lived next to David's son, Jesse, and used the Heysham surname.

“Deed of 09 October 1839, Tyler county, West Virginia, Jacob Lewis {Coffenberry} and Mary Lewis sold 75 acres to Levi Heysham for $50. Land adjoining William Trippet and Jesse Heysham on the waters of Middle Island Creek. Beginning at a white oak.” - from the Tyler County WV Deed Book 9 81+ SLC 854767

In the 1840 census of Tyler county, West Virginia as Levi Heysham, aged 30 to 40. In the household were one son under 5, Jesse, 3 sons aged 5 to 10, including William, and one son 10-15 years old, Joshua. Levi was shown as 30 to 40 years old [he was about 40 at the time]. Amongst the women in the household were one daughter under 5, Sarah, and one who was 5 to 10, Delila. There was also a woman, 30 to 40 years old, Mary. This must be David's son since he used the Heysham name and Jesse Hissem was again a near neighbor, four names below Levi in the census.

The following is from a posting by James Kelch.

"I have done some further research on Ruth Kelch, with the aid of a fellow family historian, as the Hissam name was found among my papers in connection with the Kelch family.

In a deed dated dated 29 March 1843 Leonard Kelch [1767-1848] from Tyler County, Virginia [West Virginia today] states that Leonard Kelch and his wife Jane of Tyler County sold land for $60 located on the waters of Middle Island Creek [in Tyler County] to Robert Hip and Levi Hissam and his wife. In previous deeds from the same area Leonard Kelch’s wife is mentioned as Christina."

Levi had a neighbor, Leonard Kelch Jr. Note that when Levi later moved to Missouri, a Jane Kelch went with him. She was living with Levi, under the Kelch name, in the 1850 census, with two young girls, also surnamed Kelch. These were probably her daughters, but could have been younger sisters. However, this probably means she was the widow of a man named Kelch. She had married Levi by the time of the 1860 censu. Leonard Kelch Jr. was probably the brother-in-law of Jane.

The Kelch Family

(21) Leonard Kelch Sr. (1763)

A Leonard Kelch of Tyler county, Virginia had his request for a Revolutionary War pension rejected for "further proof." He could have served in the last years of the war.

At the time of the 1810 census, Leonard Kelch Sr. (1763) lived in Dunbar township, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, with a household of 9 people.

Leonard Kelch, the only man of that surname in Tyler county, had a household of 8 people in the 1820 census.

In the 1830 census with a household of 5 people, two sons, one 10-14 and the other 15-19, Leonard Jr. and Ruel, and one daughter, 10-14, Jane? Leonard was 60-69 and his wife was 50-59.

There were four Kelch men who were heads-of-households in Tyler county in the 1840 census: Leonard Sr., Leonard Jr, Ruel, and Leonard of L.
- Leonard Sr. had 3 in his household, a man and a woman, 70-79, and one girl, 5-9. On the same page of the census was Elijah Heysham and Thomas Heysham Jr., both of the Thomas of Thomas line.

Leonard Sr. died in 1848 in Tyler county.

(22) Leonard Kelch Jr. (1803)

A Leonard Kelch Jr. married Elizabeth Davis, the daughter of Robert Davis Jr., on 5 May 1824 in Tyler county. Leonard wasstill married to Elizabeth in the 1850 through 1850 census.

He was immediately after Levi Heysham in the 1840census, and had 4 people in his household, 1 son, 1 daughter, and a man and a wife, both 20-29 years old. Leonard died in 1876.

(22) Ruel Kelch (1805)

He had 8 people in his houseshold in 1840, 1 son, 5 daughters, a husband, 20-29, and a wife, 30-39 - too old for our Jane.

(22) Leonard Kelch of L

A Leonard Kelch married Jane Hissam in 1837 in Tyler county. Leonard had 8 people in his household in 1840, 3 sons, 3 daughters, and a husband and wife, both 30-39.

Levi Hissam moved to Monroe county, Missouri. This is in the northeast of the state. Paris is the county seat.

In the 1850 census of District 59, Monroe county, Missouri, as Levi Hissam [in familysearch.org as Hessum], a cooper, aged 48 [1802], of Pennsylvannia. Living with him were Joshua, 20, an "idiot," and William, 16, also coopers and born in Pennsylvania, Jesse, 14, and Sarah, 12, who were born in Virginia. He had no wife, presumably Mary Welker had died, but also living with him were Jane Kelfrs [hard to read, but probably Kelch; Kelps in familysearch.org], 29, of Pennsylvania, and Mary J., 9, and Ruth, 7, of Virginia. These latter two girls seem to have been children of Jane's, so the Kelch surname may have been from a previous marriage. Note that Ruth was referred to as Ruth Kelch in the 1860 census. Jane and Levi were later married. Delila had married John R. Searcy on 2 May 1850.

In 1856 Levi bought property in Audrain county, in northeast Missouri, just below Monroe and Ralls counties.

"The United States of America
Certificate No. 31,887
To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting:
Whereas Levi Hissem of Audrain county, Missouri
has deposited in the General Land Offices of the United States, a Certificate of the Register of the Land Office at Palmyra, whereby it appears that full payment has been made by the said Levi Hissem according to the provisions of the Act of Congress of the 24th of April, 1820, entitled "An act making further provision for the sale of the Public Lands," for the south West quarter of Section Seventeen, in Township fifty two . . . [and so forth] . . . containing one hundred and sixty acres . . . purchased by Levi Hissem.
1 September 1856, - from "U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907"
Section 17, Township 52N, Range 7W, Meridian 5th PM, Audrain county. This appears to be Prairie township, near Laddonia, on the border with Ralls county.

Levi probably continued to live in or near Audrain county until 1858, when his daughter Sarah was married there.

The property in Audrain county must not have worked out.

In the 1860 census of Delaware township, Shannon county, Missouri as Levi Hissom, a 58 year old farmer, of Pennsylvania. This region is far to the south of Monroe county, near the state's southern boundary. Levi's wife was Jane [Kelch], 40, born in Virginia. His children were Joshua, 28, referred to as an 'idiot,' and William, 26, a wagon maker. Both sons were also born in Pennsylvania. There is a Ruthia Kelch, 14, living with them. If this was the Ruth above, she should have been more like 17.

I think Levi moved back to northern Missouri, and there died, before 1870. His son, Joshua, is next found in the 1870 census of the Ralls county poor farm, which is just east of Monroe county, where Levi had lived in 1850. I think this shows that Levi returned north before his death. Otherwise how did his "idiot" son get left there, rather than in Shannon county's poor house?

What happened to Jane?

Levi's children were,
(23) Delila M. Hissem (1829)
(23) Joshua Hissem (1830)
(23) William Hissem (1834)
(23) Jesse Hissem (1836)
(23) Sarah Hissem (1838)

(23) Delila M. Hissem (1829)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Levi Hissem (1802)

She was born on 10 January 1829, perhaps in Virginia. "Delila Hissum Daughter of Levi Hissum" married John R. Searcy on 2 May 1850 in Monroe county, Missouri.

"John R Sourcy To Delilia Hissum
State of Missouri County of Monroe
I Milton Williamson a Justice of the Peace within and for the County and State aforesaid do hereby Certify that I solemnized the rites of Matrimony between John R. Seurcy and Delila Hissum Daughter of Levi Hissum all of this County and State aforesaid the 2nd of May AD 1850
Milton Williamson J.P."

In the 1850 census of Monroe county, Missouri as John R. Searcy, 37, of Kentucky, and Delila Searcy, 30, of Missouri. The Searcy's have also been found in the 1870, 1880, 1900 and 1910 census of Monroe county.

Delila died on 25 March 1916 in Monroe county, Missouri - from the Missouri Death Index.

(23) Joshua Hissem (1830)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Levi Hissem (1802)

He was born in Pennsylvania. In the 1850 census of District 59, Monroe county, Missouri as Joshua, a 20 year old cooper, and "idiot," born in Pennsylvania, and living with his parents. In the 1860 census of Delaware township, Shannon county, Missouri as Joshua Hissem, 28, again listed as an 'idiot,' born in Pennsylvania, and living with his father.

After his father's death Joshua was left in the care of the county.

In the 1870 census of the New London post office, Spenser township, Ralls county, Missouri as Joshua Hissem, a 36 year old pauper living in the poor house. He was shown as 'insane' and born in Ohio [sic]. Ralls county is just west of Monroe county, in the northeast of the state, and rests on the Mississippi river. Mark Twain's boyhood home, Hannibal, lies between Ralls and Marion county.

In the 1880 census for Spenser township, Ralls county, Missouri as Joshua Hissom, a 50 year old pauper. He was living on the county farm, that is, the poor house. There were six men and women, all paupers, living with them. As before, it indicates he was born in Ohio, but as an "idiot" I guess I wouldn't expect him to correct this, nor provide his proper age. His parents were also shown as being from Ohio.

In the 1900 census of Center Village, Ralls county, Missouri as Josh Hissum, a 60 year old pauper and inmate of the county farm, born in April 1840, of Kentucky. While many of those attributes are incorrect, I still think this must be our man. I'm assuming again that no one was too concerned to get the facts right for an "idiot." Joshua could not read or write. Amazingly, the census also claims he couldn't speak English either, but since some many of the inmates got this annotation, I doubt its truth. Might Joshua have been a mute?

There was a cemetary associated with the Rall county farm, or Poor Farm [#108, 36-55-6], but only six internments are recorded, none of them Joshua.

(23) William Hissem (1834)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Levi Hissem (1802)

He was born in Pennsylvania. In the 1850 census of District 59, Monroe county, Missouri, as William Hissam, a 16 year old cooper, born in Pennsylvania, and living with his parents.

As with his father, there is, in 1856, a property purchase by William Hissem in Audrain county, Missouri - it was the certificate issued just after his father's and may indicate that his father was leveraging his 22 year old son in order to gain more land.

"The United States of America
Certificate No. 31,888
To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting:
Whereas William Hissem of Audrain county, Missouri
has deposited in the General Land Offices of the United States, a Certificate of the Register of the Land Office at Palmyra, whereby it appears that full payment has been made by the said William Hissem according to the provisions of the Act of Congress of the 24th of April, 1820, entitled "An act making further provision for the sale of the Public Lands," for the north West quarter of Section twenty, in Township fifty two . . . [and so forth] . . . containing one hundred and sixty acres . . . purchased by William Hissem.
1 September 1856, - from "U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907"
"Section 20, Township 52N, Range 7W, Meridian 5th PM, Audrain county." This appears to be Prairie township, near Laddonia, on the border with Ralls county. This section was just below the section in which his father's lands were located.

In the 1860 census of Delaware township, Shannon county, Missouri as William Hissom, a 26 year old wagon maker, born in Pennsylvania, and living with his father. William disappears after this.

(23) Jesse Hissem (1836)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Levi Hissem (1802)

He was born in Virginia, probably in Tyler county, in about 1836. In the 1850 census of Monroe county, Missouri as Jesse Hissam, 14, born in Virginia. He was not in the 1860 census, neither on his own or with his parents, as were his brothers Joshua and William.

In the 1860 census . . .

A Jesse Hissam [sic] served in the Civil War in the 10th West Virginia "Volunteer" Infantry regiment with Thomas J. and Samuel Hissam, possible cousins, the sons of (22) Thomas Hissem (1778), of the Thomas of Thomas Line. He could have gone to Ohio to join this unit with his cousins. He was inducted as a Sergeant and discharged as a Private [oops]. I haven't been able to find any other Jesse of the right age to fit this role.

I have a stray, undated, reference, "To Capt. Aug. 8 Darnell, In charge of prisoners for Wheeling, Wheeling, Va. Request Governor Pierpont to grant no commission to Jesse Hissam until letter is . . ." - from "Calendar of the Francis Harrison Pierpont Letters and Papers." Pierpoint (1814-1899), called the Father of West Virginia, was the Governor of the Union controlled portions of Virginia during the Civil War. He was Governor of all of Virginia from 1865 to 1868.

In the 1880 census of Harmon [Harmar], Washington county, Ohio as Jessie Hisam, a 45 year old cooper. Living with him was his wife, Evoline, 43. I think they had been married 16 years. Jessie had been living in the county for 4 years at the time of the census. He had been born in Ohio [sic], of Pennsylvania parents; she in Virginia, of Pennsylvania parents. I think this may be 'our' Jesse in part because not only is the age right, but he was a cooper, like (22) Levi, (23) Joshua and (23) William.

Did Jesse serve in the war with his Ohio cousins then settle there after the war to raise his family? On 19 July 1890 "Jesse Hisam" filed for a pension as an invalid of the Civil War.

(23) Sarah Hissem (1838)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) Levi Hissem (1802)

She was born in Virginia, probably in Tyler county, in about 1838. In the 1850 census of Monroe county, Missouri as Sarah Hissam, 12. Sarah Hissom married Harrison Smith on 10 January 1858 in Audrain county, Missouri.

"Page 245. SMITH, Harrison – HISSOM, Sarah – 10 Jan 1858" - from the "Audrain County Marriage Book"
Audrain county is due south of Monroe and Rall counties.

(22) John Hissem (1804)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750)

The younger of two sons living with Thomas in Westmoreland county at the time of the 1810 census. Based on his age at the time of his death he was probably born in 1804. Like his brother Levi, I think John stayed in Pennsylvania when his father moved to Tyler county, West Virginia circa 1820. Neither brother was in the 1820 census, but both married Welker daughters who were living in Hempfield township, Westomoreland county circa 1825. I wonder if Levi and John were living with their older brother, Abner. He remained in Hempfield township and, moreover, married a Welker daughter, though of an earlier generation. Did he introduce his brothers to his wive's nieces?

A John Hissem married Elizabeth, "Bessie," the daughter of Jacob Welker of Hempfield township, Westmoreland county. She was born in about 1810 in Hempfield township, Westmoreland county. The earliest child of John's for whom I have any confidence, Jacob, was born in 1832. John would have been 21 years old in 1825, so I'm assuming the marriage occurred between 1825 and 1831. If Elizabeth was born in 1810, the latter date would be more likely.

“Elizabeth Welker, b. ----, in Hempfield Twp.; m. John Hissem; farmers; some time after their marriage he removed with his family to the state of Iowa; there died and left children.” - from the "History and Genealogy of the Reed Family" by Dr. Willoughby Henry Reed
Elizabeth was the daughter of Jacob Welker and Rosana Hartman. The Hissems and Welkers intermarried three times, with Abner, John and Levi. See The Welker Family webpage for their derivation.

The Welker Family

An extensive history of a family that married into the Hissem family three times; with Abner, John and Levi.

Further troubling the Westmoreland vs. Tyler county issue is the 1830 census in which we have a John of the right age in both areas. Note that his brother Levi was in Westmoreland at this time.

In the 1830 census of Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania as John Hissim [Hssim in Ancestry.com], aged 30 to 40, John would have been 26. There was a boy, 5 to 10, in the house as well as women, one under 5, one 5-10, one 10-15, and one 20 to 30, Elizabeth would have been 20. Note that John's father-in-law, Jacob Welker, and older brother, Abner, were on the same page of the census. That makes it more likely that this was our John, but John's age is off and that's a passle of children for such a young couple. I can accept that the older girl may be a niece or servant.

In in the 1830 census of Wood county, Virginia as John Hisum. In the household was a man 30-40 years old, John, and a woman 20-30, Elizabeth. Wood county was an early 'super-county' from which Ritchie and Pleasants counties were later formed. It is on the Ohio river, just downstream from Tyler county where his father resided. If this is a good reference, then John and his new bride first moved down the Ohio river, before they moved into Ohio, which is just across the river. Note that John's son, Jacob A. Hysham, was born in Virginia in 1832, and his second son, Stephen H. Hysham, was born in Ohio in 1835.

The following is from the will of John's father-in-law, Jacob Welker, proved on 11 February 1834 in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania.

"First--I devise my dwelling and plantation unto my son Michael Welker on the following conditions:--By him paying to his sisters and brothers out of the same the following named sums, to-wit: In four months after my decease, he pays the sum of $14.25 to my son John Welker, and in four months after that payment the like sume to my son Samuel; and in four months after that the like sum to my daughter Polly intermarried to Levy Hissom; and in four months after that payment the like sum to my daughter Bessie intermarried with John Hissom . . ."
. . .
Third: . . . I direct my executors to divide the same [my personal estate] into eight equal shares and give and devise two shares thereof to my son John, and one hsare thereof to my son Samuel, one share to my daughter Polly, and one share to my daughter Betsy, and one share to my daughter Nancy, and one share thereof to my daughter Sophia, and one share thereof to my daughter Catherine, to be paid to them by my executors, after the estate is settled, &c."

I believe that all of those surnamed Hysham, below, are the children of John. Remember that in the census of Northampton county in 1790 and 1800 the family was known as Hysham. Note that there was also a Hysham family in Kansas, descended from a Henry Hysham. They are not related to the below, but to a family that came over from Portsea, England in the 19th century. For this family see the Hysham-Drake page.

Soon after being mentioned in her father's will of 1834, Elizabeth Welker died (of course, considering the state of communications in that era she could have died earlier and the family back in Pennsylvania been none the wiser). Note the family dynamics in the story continued below. Jacob and the subsequent children of John have little to do with one another in their adult lives leading me to believe they were half-brothers, the sons of different mothers.

John Hysham moved to northwestern Ohio where he met and married Lucinda [Simpson] Guin - from the Lineage Book of the Daughters of the American Revolution. With his son, Jacob, still a toddler he would have remarried as quickly as he could to provide the boy with a mother.

Sometimes known as Cinda, Lucinda was born in about 1806 in Ohio [or Virginia per the 1850 and 1870 census]. She was the daughter of Elizabeth Caroll, who herself was born on 8 January 1776 in Fayette county, Pennsylvania [or Frederick county, Maryland] and died on 28 September 1845 in Mount Cory, Hancock county, Ohio. Elizabeth first married [William?] Simpson and had one daughter, our Lucinda. After the death of William, Elizabeth married Neal Johnson Guin in 1806. They had four more children, including Jacob and Jonathan. Lucinda took the name Lucinda Simpson Guin, honoring both her natural and adoptive fathers.

In the 1840 census . . . I haven't yet found John and his family in the 1840 census. His mother-in-law was in the census for Union township, Hancock county as Elizabeth Guin. His brother-in-law, Jacob Guin, was also listed. Hancock county is just east of Putnam county, where John and Lucinda are found in 1850. There was a John Hasson in the county, in Orange township. While his surname is close enough, and unique enough, for me to consider, his family appears to be too old for this to be our man. In the household there was one boy 15-20, 2 who were 20-30 and one man 50-60. There was also one girl under 5, 2 who were 5-10, 1 10-15, and one woman 50-60. None of these look like our John, who would have been 36.

In the Federal Mortality Schedule of 1850 for Blanchard township, Putnam county, Ohio as John Hisham, a 46 year old farmer [1804], of Pennsylvania, married, who died in March 1850 of consumption after an illness of 6 months. Putnam county is just west of Hancock county. There is also an entry

"Name=John Hysham, Gender=Male, Birth Place=Penn., Spouse=Lucinda S. Guinne, Child=Jacob A. Hysham" - from "Iowa, Select Deaths and Burials, 1850-1990"

In the 1850 census for Blanchard township, Putnam county, Ohio as Lucinda Hesham, 38 [1812], born in Virginia, with no occupation. Living with her were Jacob, an 18 year old farmer, Hiram, a 15 year old farmer, Elizabeth, 12, and Margaret, 9, all born in Ohio.

The family moved to Iowa after the 1850 census, but no later than 1852, when Jacob showed up on the Iowa state census of that year. The use of the surname Hesham/Hisham strongly encourages me in the believe that these were, in fact, Hyshams, using all the usual variants of the name.

Lucinda left Ohio, in company with her brothers, and settled her family in northeastern Iowa. A poem writen by Lucinda, and given to her son-in-law, Shawn Harkin, listed below, talks of John dying in Ohio and then coming to Iowa with her children and her half-brothers, the Guins.

""What's that slowly coming. Three wagons.
They are filled with Guinns (in a row and Hyshams)
And they came from Ohio
Grandma Hysham was among the crowd,
She had no strong arm to lean upon,
Death had robbed her of her mate.
With her young family she was left alone.
Her brothers were coming to Iowa [this would the Guins]
Then, it was called the unsettled west.
Not wanting to be left behind, she sold her land,
Packed her wares and came with the rest...
They came to relatives of Taylorsville [Fayette county, Iowa] etc...
Uncle Jake went to Red Oak, where he prospered and died
Uncle Hiram went to South Dakota
Where he failed and lost, but tried........"

In the 1860 census of Elkader post office, Cox Creek township, Clayton county, Iowa as Lucinda Hasham, 51, born in Virginia. She was living in the home of Henry Hasham [I suspect this is really Hiram Hysham], a 24 year old farmer, born in Ohio. Also living with Henry was his wife, Anna [Amy?], 24, of Canada, and son, Frankie, 10/12, who was born in Iowa. An Ashley Parks, 21, was also livinng in the house. A servant?

Iowa

On December 28, 1846, Iowa became a state.

Fayette county is located in northeastern Iowa. It was originally one of the largest counties ever organized. It had an area of about 140,000 square miles and included all of the present state of Minnesota west of the Mississippi. Almost all of the counties of northeastern Iowa were formed out of this county. It was opened to white settlers in four separate tracts. In 1833, the Black Hawk Purchase opened the southeastern 2/5ths. West of that, in 1837, a small additional purchase from the Indians, and in 1842 the rest of the southwestern portion was opened along with the much larger purchase embracing at least half of Iowa below the neutral grounds. In 1848, the remainder of the county, more than half, to the north and northwest which was in the neutral grounds was opened up with the displacement of the Winnebagoes to Minnesota. Officially the treaty was signed in 1846 and there had been white settlers exploring the entire county. However, the county did not receive its own administration until 1847.

Clayton county is in the northeastern corner of Iowa, one of many counties made out of the original Fayette county. Elkader is the county seat, located in a beautiful valley astride the Turkey River, in the "driftless area" of Clayton County. The region was not scoured by glaciers in the last ice age and remained rugged while the surrounding area was scraped level. Elkader is the hub of a large trade area which includes one of the most prosperous and diversified farming sections in the midwest. It is near the center of 470,000 Clayton County farm acres. The town is named after Abdel-Kader, a young Algerian hero who led his people in a resistance to French colonialism between 1830 and 1847.

Washington county is in the southeastern corner of Iowa, as are Van Buren and Davis counties.

Red Oak is the chief town and county seat of Montgomery county, which is located on the the Missouri river in the southwestern corner of Iowa.

In an email to Shawn Harkin, Paula Thomas [silver_vampyre@yahoo.com] wrote, "hi, i've read all your info about Margaret's mom being lavender, and all that. the thing is, in a book by bertha schucmann [schumann?] called 'remember mee' she has Margaret's parents as being John Hysham and Lucinda Simpson. she says she got the information from a woman in oregon, i believe. she didn't trace the hyshams back any farther, but lucinda goes back to a revolutionary soldier, william carrol."

According to the following, Lucinda married John Blevin, but the 1870 census seems to bely this.

"John Blevin purchased the Bemis farm of two young men named Brownson and he moved on this farm in 1851. Here Mr. Blevin's wife died and he afterwards married a widow named Hysham, mother of Jacob and Hiram Hysham, two well known men in the county in early days. Mr. Blevin sold out to Chancy Bemis in 1855. He was somewhat of an exhorter and took great interest in Sunday school and church affairs." - from the "History of Clayton County, Iowa" by Realto E. Price
Perhaps John married Lucinda after the 1860 and died before the 1870 census.

In the 1870 census of Smithfield township, Fayette county, Iowa as Lucinda Hysham [while the handwriting is a little unclear, this could be Heysham], 65. She was living in the home of her daugther, Margaret, above, and her husband Andrew Harkin. She was shown as born in Virginia.

Between 1880 and 1890 Lucinda moved north to Beadle county, South Dakota with her son, S. H. Hysham, and his family. Jacob, Stephen's [half?] brother, moved west to Montgomery county, Iowa sometime between 1870 and 1880.

Beadle county, South Dakota

Located in the east central portion of the state. Huron is the major city of the county. It was first staked out only in 1880.

Lucinda died on 9 December 1889 in Beadle, South Dakota and was buried in 1899 in the Lawrence Cemetery. From The Dakota Huronite, Huron township, Beadle county, South Dakota, Thursday, 12 December 1889, page 8, column 3:

“Lucinda Hysham,...Grandma Hysham, died at the home of her son, S. H. Hysham, near Beatrice, on Monday afternoon, 9 December 1889, aged 83 years, two months and two days, after an illness of about one week. The funeral took place from the residence of Mr. Hysham...Wednesday.”
She was buried in the Liberty Centery [sic] cemetery in Yale, Beadle county, South Dakota.



John and Elizabeth Welker had the following children:
(23) William Hisham (1826) [perhaps]
(23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832)

John and Lucinda Simpson had the following children:
(23) Stephen Hiram Hysham (1835)
(23) Elizabeth Hysham (c1837)
(23) Margaret Maria Hysham (1841)

(23) William Hisham (1826)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804)

A possible son for John [?]. I place this here because of his last name, which seems to align with the Hesham/Hisham/Hasham spellings we see above. In the 1830 census of Hempfield township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania there was a John Hissim with a son aged 5 to 10 years old. However, I have my doubts that this is really the John Hissem of 1804.

Along with his wife Mariah, William Hisham [this could be Hesham] he was living in Crawford township, Washington county, Iowa during the 1850 census. William was born in 1826 and Mariah in 1830. It's hard to be certain of his occupation [poor handwriting on the census], but I'm pretty certain it's blacksmith. The value of his land appears to be $500. His place of birth, again hard to read, but it clearly begins with a P, so I’ll say Pennsylvannia. This might make his mother Elizabeth Welker. Mariah appears to have been born in New York. The fact that he was living in Washington county may argue against him being a son of John.

(23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804)

He was born on 22 April 1832, probably in Wood county, in what is now West Virginia. I think he was the son of Elizabeth Welker Hysham. Note that her father's name was Jacob too, so he may have been named after his grandfather. In the 1850 census for Blanchard township, Putnam county, Ohio as Jacob Hesham, an 18 year old farmer, living with his mother.

He left Ohio with his mother and siblings, and her Guinn brothers, for Iowa between 1850 and 1852.

In the 1852 state census Jacob was living in Fairfield township, Fayette county, Iowa. He married Melvina Julia Russell, known as Julia. She was born on 17 January 1832 in New YOrk. On 5 January 1856 their first child, William John, was born in Elkader, Clayton county, Iowa. Their other three sons, Charles J., Thomas J., and Vernon J., were also born in Clayton county. Since this county was created out of Fayette county, this was probably a boundary shift vice a movement by Jacob.

In the 1860 census of Elkader township, Clayton county as J. A. Hushem [Harshem in Ancestry.com], a 27 year old merchant. He had $3,200 in real property and $1,000 in personal property. Living with him were his wife, Julia, 27, his children, Wm. J., 4, and Chas J., 1, his half-sister, Elizabeth, 21, who was born in Virginia, and a student at law, Realto Price, 21. Was Jacob renting out rooms? Note: Realto Exzeque Price was born in 1840 in Iowa. He married Phileta in 1866 and in the 1870 census was a next door neighbor of Jacob Hysham. By this time he was a lawyer and went on to become a notable one, at least in the county's eyes. He edited the "History of Clayton County, Iowa," which is referenced several times in this webpage. He died in 1935 and was buried in Elkader.

There was a hotel in the Elkader, called the Washington House, whose proprietors were listed as Hysham & Fisher - from the Iowa State Gazeteer.

In the 1870 census of Boardman township, Clayton county, Iowa as Jacob A. Hysham, a 37 year old cattle and hog buyer. Living with him were his wife, Julia, 36, who was born in New York, and children, William, 14, Charles, 10, Thomas 8, and Vernon, 5, all of whom were born in Iowa. He had a maid, but there were also 4 stone cutters residing at his house which may indicate that he was adding on to his present house or building a new one.

"In 1870, the only railroad in Clayton county was the line from North McGregor through Monona and Luana and to the west . . . and the big men of the town, of whom there were many, interested themselves greatly in railroad projects. The Dubuque and Minnesota was one of the first lines pushed; S.T. Woodward and J.H. Merrill being directors. H.B. Carter, J.A. Hysham, . . . represented Clayton county at the meeting held to organize." - from "History of Clayton County, Iowa" by Realto E. Price. In another spot in the history "James [sic] Hysham" was said to be one of the promoters of a narrow gauge railroad venture in the county.

On 11 May 1871 the First National Bank of Elkader, in Clayton county, received its charter. Amongst the first stockholders was J. A. Hysham. Sometime after this he moved west to Montgomery county. J.A. Hysham was listed as an early settler of Montgomery county, a one-time mayor of the town of Red Oak, a member of the board of directors of the county fair, and a successful businessman.

In the 1880 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Jacob Hysham, a 48 year old famer. He was born in Virginia. This census introduces some problems. First Jacob's father was shown as born in North Carolina and his mother in Maryland. Second, he's married to Emily, not Julia. Based on census information below, these appear to be aberrations. Living with Jacob were his wife, Emily [sic], 48, who was born in New York & whose parents were both born in Connecticut, and children, Charles, 21, Thomas, 19, and Vernon, 14, all born in Iowa. It appears William J. Hysham had already left home at this pont. Also note that the family had five servants. Times must have been good.

In the state census of 1895 for Red Oak as Jacob A. Hysham, 62. He was shown as born in Virginia. Living with him were his wife, Julia [she's back!], 60, and sons, Thomas J., 37, and Vernon J., 29, both born in Clayton county, and Vernon's wife, Nancy, 24. Nancy had been born in Montgomery county, Iowa.

Melvina Julia Russell Hysham died on 5 October 1898 and was buried in the Evergreen cemetary, Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa.

In the 1900 census of Red Oak as A. J. [dsylexia?] Hysham, a 67 year old capitalist [I can just see the old gentleman, proud of his accomplishments, and dismissive of the census taker, giving him this occupational title!], of Virginia, born in April 1833 [sic]. He was listed as still married [M]. Again, I'll call this a census taker's errror. His father was from Pennsylvania and his mother from Virginia, which is more in line with what we would expect. Living with him were his children, Tom J., a 39 year old attorney [August 1860], Verne, a 34 year old in stock raising [Aug 1863], and daughter-in-law, Nancy, 29 [May 1871]. Verne and Nancy had been married for 10 years and had one child, John [Tom?] Philip Jacob, 2 [September 1897]. All the children were born in Iowa.

In the 1910 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Jacob A. Hysham, 78, living with his son, Vernon J. Hysham. Jacob was shown as born in Virginia while his father, Vernon's grandfather, was born in Pennsylvania. Jacob died on 26 February 1915 in Iowa. He was buried in the Evergreen cemetary, Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa, with his wife, Julia.

His children were,
(24) William John Hysham (1856)
(24) Charles J. Hysham (1858)
(24) Thomas Jefferson Hysham (1860)
(24) Vernon Jackson Hysham (1865)

(24) William John Hysham (1856)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832)

He was born on 5 January 1856 in Elkader, Clayton county, Iowa. In the 1860 census of Elkader township, Clayton county as Wm. J. Hushem [Harshem in Ancestry.com], 4. In the 1870 census of Boardman township, Clayton county, Iowa as William Hysham, 14.

William J. Hysham, of Elkador, Clayton county, entered the agricultural school at Iowa State University at Ames in 1872. The student body numbered only 263.

William John Hysham married Nancy Jane Pyle on 19 May 1879 in Red Oak, Iowa. She was born on 9 December 1856 in Mount Carroll, Carroll county, Illinois [the home of Ensign John Metcalf Hissem], the youngest daughter of Thomas C. Pyle and Margaret Rinedollar. The Pyles had moved to Red Oak in 1878.

In the 1880 census of Grant township, Montgomery county, Iowa as William Hysham, a 25 year old Nurseryman, born in Iowa. The "Genealogy of the Sharpless Family," which address Nancy Jane's family, confirms that William was in the nursery business. His parents were born in Virginia and Pennsylvania. Living with him was his wife, Nannie [Nancy] J., 24, who was born in Illinois. Her sister Mary was also living with them. Soon after this their son Verni was born, in 1880, and they moved into the town of Red Oak, Iowa.

In the 1885 Iowa state census as W.J. Heysham, 29. He was born in Clayton county and lived in Red Oak with his wife, Nanna, 28, and son, Verni, aged 4. Nanna was born in Illinois and Verni was born in Montgomery county.

Verni died in 1898 during the Spanish-American war. Sometime after this William divorced Nanna and moved west. The divorce and the single child indicate that the marriage may have been an unhappy one from the beginning.

In the 1900 census of Omaha, Douglas county, Nebraska as Wm. Hyshum [Hysham], 40 [sic]. His occupation is unclear. His date of birth was off, showing January 1860. Living with him was his second wife, Etta O., 38 [February 1862], of New York. They had been married for 0 years and had no children. I assume William met her in Nebraska. Omaha is just northwest of Red Oak, across the Missouri river.

William's first wife, Nancy, remained in Iowa. In the 1900 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Nannie Hysham, a 42 year old dress maker, born in December 1857 in Illinois, living alone. It indicates she was a widow, but perhaps they meant she was a grass-widow [divorced]. Worse, maybe William ran off, leaving her to assume he had died. She had one child, who was no longer living. Her father was from Maryland and her mother from Pennsylvania.

Etta had died by 1883 and William continued to move west. In the 1910 census of Moorcroft precinct, Crook county, Wyoming as Wm. J. Hysham, a 54 year old farmer working a homestead. Living with him was his new wife, Ida R., 39, of New York. This was his third marriage, her first, and they had been married for 7 years. William was shown as born in Iowa and Ida as born in New York. They had no children. Note that Charles J. Hysham, a brother below, also lived in Nebraska and Wyoming for an undetermined periods. Its not clear whether William went to these two states looking for gold (in Wyoming), as an agent of his brother who was a cattle dealer, or simply as a homesteader.

Crook County, Wyoming

Located in the extreme northeast of Wyoming in the famous Black Hills. In 1874 gold was discovered near what is today Custer, South Dakota. There was no way to keep prospectors from stampeding into the forbidden hills. On the heels of the discovery the government, who was also curious, sent Generals Crook, Custer and Gibbon into the area. Crook county is named after General Crook.

"Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Hysham of Lynden, Wyo., are expected in town tomorrow for a stay here. They have been attending the wedding of a daughter of B. Chamberlain in Kingston." - from the "Catskill Mountain News" of Margaretville, New York on 2 July 1909.

Also in the 1910 census for Red Oak, Iowa, was William's first wife, Nancy J. Hysham, a 54 year old nurse, who was divorced. She was born in Illinois. Divorce was a fairly extreme measure in those early days.

William died in 1913 and was buried in the Red Oak Cemetery, so perhaps he moved back after that adventure failed or at least his remains did. His tombstone shows his name as J.W. Hysham, with a date of death of 1913. Was J.W. a typo or more dsylexia? 'Nanna' Hysham died on 5 November 1937 in Red Oak. She was buried in the Evergreen cemetary in Red Oak.

His only child was,
(25) Verni Russell Hysham (1880)

(25) Verni Russell Hysham (1880)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) William John Hysham (1856)

Also called Verne. He was born on 30 July 1880 [1881?] in Grant township, Montgomery county. His family moved to Red Oak when he was still young. In the 1885 Iowa census of Red Oak as Verni Heysham, aged 4.

In 1898 the Spanish-American War broke out and Verni joined the 51st Iowa Regiment.

The 51st Iowa Volunteers

The Company was mustered into service in the late spring of 1898 and was sent to San Francisco. The Presidio at San Francisco was a natural staging point because of its proximity to the finest harbor on the west coast, and possessed enough land to house and train large numbers of troops for service in the Philippines. The regiment went into camp at once, south of the Presidio, on the site of an old Chinese burying ground, left, on a dismal stretch of sand which was designated as Camp Merritt. Not only was the camp a dreary one, but after a time it became an unhealthy one. The Regiment lost five men in San Francisco from disease, but none from combat, while nine men were wounded in action.

The regiment was later moved to Camp Merriam, in the middle of the photo to the right. The camp was located on the eastern border of the Presidio close to the Lombard Gate entrance. At the top left of the photo is the area that became Crissy Air Field in the 20th century, and today a city park.


During the time in camp time hung heavy on the men's hands. Below is a photograph of the boys of the 51st playing football.

Below the 51st marches out of the Lombard Gate enroute to the Philippines.

The unit embarked on 3 November in the transport PENNSYLVANIA and arrived in the Philippines on 16 December 1898. The Spanish-American War had ended on 10 December 1898 with the Treaty of Paris. The unit saw action in the Philippine-American War, which began on 4 February 1899. Many of those listed in the roster were from Red Oak, Iowa.

A stone monument at the corner of Ruger Street and Sherman Road at the Presidio in San Francisco marks the camp site of the 51st Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Above is a photo of troops entering the Presidio at Lombard Gate. Most troops enroute to the Philippines passed through this gate.

Verni was one of the young men who died of disease while in camp, on 20 August 1898, in San Francisco.

"Hysham, Verni R. Age 18. Residence Red Oak, nativity Iowa. Enlisted April 16, 1898, as Wagoner. Mustered May 30, 1898. Died of disease Aug. 20, 1898, San Francisco, Cal." - from "Roster and Record of Iowa Soldiers in the War of the Rebllion and Spanish-American and Philippine Wars"
"Wagoner Verni R. Hysham, Co. M; died at St. Luke's hospital, San Francisco, Cal., August 20, 1898, of typhoid-pneumonia." - from "Legislative Documents" of the State of Iowa
Another document calls Verni's cause of death as typhoid fever. I think it probable that Verni was first admitted to the Presidio post hospital, below

"Verni R. Hysham, son of W.J. Hysham of Red Oak, died at St. Luke's hospital in San Francisco, August 20, 1898, of typhoid pneumonia. He was one of the youngest members of the company, having been born on a farm in Grant township, July 30th, 1880. His parents moved to Red Oak when he was quite young and most of his short life was spent in that city. He was vivacious, full of life, and a general favorite with the company. His body was brought to Red Oak on Thursday, August 25th, the funeral being held on the same afternoon." - from "A History of thge County of Montgomery" by William Walace Merritt
Other military records show his last name to be Heysham. His mother was listed as Nanna Hysham. He was buried in the Evergreen cemetary, Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa. His tombstone reads, "Company M., 51st Iowa Vol. Infantry, Spanish-American War Veteran." A Roster of the 51st Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Company M lists: . . . Hysham, Verni - From: Markey, Joseph, "From Iowa to the Philippines a History of Company M. Fifty-First Iowa Infantry Volunteers"

(24) Charles J. Hysham (1858)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832)

He was born in September 1858 in Elkader, Clayton county, Iowa. In the 1860 census of Elkader township, Clayton county as Chas. J. Hushem [Harshem in Ancestry.com], 1. In the 1870 census of Boardman township, Clayton county, Iowa as Charles Hysham, 10, born in Iowa. In the 1880 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Charles Heysham, 21, still living with his father.

"During his youth," Charles spent time out west in the town of Dayton, Wyoming - from "Our Neck O' the Woods" by Charles C. Rawlings. This book covers a period from 1806-1905. Sheridan county is in northern Wyoming, along the border with Montana. The town of Dayton is in Sheridan County, on the banks of the Tongue River near the Bighorn National Forest.

Dayton, Wyoming

The town was founded in the Big Horn Mountain country as early as 1822, but not incorporated until 1906. Agriculture played a large part in the history of Dayton. Fertile land and abundant water attracted many ranchers and farmers. The Padlock Ranch, located just outside of Dayton, is one of the largest working ranches in the country, but few of the old ranches remain in either size or name. Dude ranching is now an important asset to the area.

Charles J. Hysham married Eva Stimson in 1897. She was born in March 1878 in Iowa. He would have been 39 and she 19. I suspect that Charles spent the years from 1880 to 1897 out west.

Charles first two sons were born in Iowa, between 1897 and 1899.

Soon thereafter Charles moved his family west. In 1899 the Crow indians renegotiated the grazing rights they had first leased in 1891. District 2, which was east of the Big Horn river and south of the Yellowstone river, and due east of Billings, Montana, was leased to Charles J. Hysham. A town at the northern limit of the District, on the river, would become known as Hysham. There is a map of the districts at "Crow Land Lease Deals".

In the 1900 census of Ranchester, Sheridan county, Wyoming as Charles J. Hysham [Hughan in Ancestry.com], a 41 year old farmer stock [I assume this means he both farmed and raised livestock]. Living with him were his wife, Eva, 22 [March 1878], and sons, Harry D., 2 [November 1897], and Charles R., 1 [January 1899]. All were born in Iowa.

Ranchester, Wyoming is just south of the border with Montana, and of the Crow grazing districts. It is also just northeast of Dayton, Wyoming. Either Charles moved his family back to the region where he had lived "during his youth," per the reference above, or the reference was actually to the 1900 period of this census. I'm pretty close to 60 myself, so I can understand how someone might equate 40 with youth.

The town of Hysham, Montana is about 60 miles due north, and within 'striking' distance, of Ranchester/Dayton, Wyoming. John Willard claims that "Charles Hysham was an "early cattleman in this area on the Yellowstone." A Custer county, Montana site calls "Charlie J. Hysham, the man behind the famous "Flying E Ranch" established in this area in the late 19th and early 20th centuries." Another travel website, MTLinks, claims "Charles Hysham, [the] owner of the Flying E brand, whose cattle range extended more than 70 miles across the country." Yet another says "Charles Hysham, a ranchman in that vicinity, who made this point [Hysham, Montanan] his headquarters." There are no clear dates when he was doing this. Note that George Lane owned the Flying E ranch from 1893 to 1900.

Hysham, Montana

At the turn of the century, shortly after Montana territory received statehood, the town now known as Hysham was part of a vast open area known as Custer County. It was on part of the Crow Reservation and the Flying E Ranch ran thousands of cattle in an area between the Big Horn river on the west to Reservation creek on the east and from the Yellowstone river to the Wyoming line.

Many of the Flying E's cattle grazed along the railroad tracks of the Northern Pacific railroad. The trainmen often left supplies that had been ordered by the ranch along side the rails, and sometime they were simply thrown off the train as it barreled by. These supplies had been ordered by Charlie J. Hysham, an associate of the Flying E, and were labeled "for Mr. Hysham." The association between the site, the Flying E, and Mr. Hysham stuck and the spot became known simply as Hysham.

Above is Hysham in 1919. Today Hysham is the county seat of Treasure County and is bordered on the north by the Yellowstone River, and to the south by beautiful rolling hills. - Ultimate Montana.com

Charles didn't keep his family in Wyoming long. He moved them to Nebraska where his third son was born in August 1901. In 1903 C.J. Hysham, of South Omaha, Nebraska, was a member of the Montana Stock Growers' Association. His ranch appeared to be named the Range Crow Reservation [?]. There is a listing of the brands he used on his cattle and horses, but since there appear to be at least 8 of them I won't try to list them.

Charles had wide interests throughout the west. "Lazy E" [ranch] "Started about 1890 near Douglas, Arizona, by Hysham Bros. and Neal [Hysham and Neal]. Robbins and Anderson bought a herd of cows in this brand in 1914 and established it in Reeves County, Texas." - from "Texas Cattle Brands" by Gus Lee. In 1905 the CJ Hysham firm, traders in Cattle and Horses, were listed in Gleeson, Arizona - from the Arizona Business Directory of 1905. Gleeson, a mining town, is today a ghost town. It is located east of Tuscon, in Cochise county.

There was a Hardin-Hysham Cattle Company with a Nebraska charter, cancelled in 1909. Stock certificates were sold.

In the census of 1910 for Omaha, Douglas county, Nebraska as Charles Hysham, a 53 year old stock 'grower' [?] on a ranch. Living with him were his wife, Eva K., 42, and children, Harry B., 12, Charles R., 11, and Thomas R., 8. They resided at 707 Park Avenue. They were doing fairly well because they had a domestic servant, Matilda Domiack, from Denmark. Red Oak is just southeast of Omaha, across the Missouri river. Note that Charles' elder brother, William, went in an opposite direction, starting in Omaha, Nebraska in 1900 and then moving to Wyoming in 1910. I also suspect that Omaha became a base of operations from which Charles traveled extensively, including in South Dakota, back to Wyoming, and probably into Montana as well.

In the 1910 City Directory of Omaha was "Hysham Chas J (McPherson & Hysham) r 707 Park av."

Charles moved his Gleeson cattle business to Douglas, Arizona further southwest of Tucson, on the border with Mexico. "Livestock Breeders-Cattle . . . Douglas [Arizona] . . . Neel & Hysham" - from Polk's Arizona and New Mexico Pictorial State Gazeteer of 1912-1913. "

In 1913 Charles and several other local farmers made a complaint against the Union Pacific Railway for charges on shipping livestock and grain into Gilmore, Nebraska. They alleged that the rates were discriminatory and asked the state for redress - from the Lincoln, Nebraska Daily News of 22 November 1913. I don't know what the upshot was.

Charles's sons, Harry and Charles, registered for the draft in September 1918 while still living at home with their parents, who were farming at RFD#3 in Omaha. Thomas was too young.

According to the "Bennett county, South Dakota listing of Federal Land Records, South Dakota Land Patents Database," on 8 May 1919 Charles received a patent for two pieces of property, of 37.61 and 37.84 acres, in the area of southeastern South Dakota.

Name Meridian TWP Range Section Acreage Type Casetype Docid Date
HYSHAM CHARLES J 06 0410N 0400W 018 37.61 253500 PA 676926 05/08/1919
HYSHAM CHARLES J 06 0410N 0400W 018 37.84 253500 PA 676926 05/08/1919
The 6th meridian in located south of Yankton, South Dakota. This is the area of South Dakota closest to northwestern Iowa and is just up the Missouri river from Omaha.
Legend: Type: 253000 - Disposition: Use and Occupancy - Indian Patents; PA - Patent
Its not clear what Charles' plans for this land were.

In the 1920 census of Gilmore, Sarpy county, Nebraska as Chas. J. Hysham [Hysharn in Ancestry.com], a 62 year old farm operator. Living with him were his wife, Eva L., 41, and sons, Harry D., 22, Chas. R., 21, and Thomas, 18. Thomas was the only one born in Nebraska. Thirteen hired men and/or boarders lived with him. Sarpy county is just south of Omaha, but still on the Missouri river.

Charles apparently had an earthmoving company as well because in 1920 a grading contract for $29,108.02, part of a roadway project, was given to C.J. Hysham of Omaha - from the Lincoln, Nebarska Evening State Journal of 19 February 1920.

From: Rozet, Campbell county, Wyoming Homesteaders 1900-1930 - C. J. Hysham was mentioned in the Campbell County Record, Approx Location of site, T52N, R70W, Newspaper Reference: CCR, 1/2/1921. Note: Campbell county was created in 1911 out of the western portions of Crook and Weston counties. Rozet is just west of the border with Crook county. These counties all have in common that they are in the Tongue/Powder river basin, the Bighorn mountains forming their western edge. Following the Powder, Tongue or Bighorn rivers downstream brings you north into Montana. The Bighorn feeds the Yellowstone river. The town of Hysham in part of the same geographic area, located just beyond the confluence of the Bighorn and Yellowstone.

In the 1930 census of Gilmore, Sarpy county, Nebraska as Charles J. Hysham [Hyson in Ancestry.com], a 72 year old farmer. Living with him were his wife, Evelyn L., 52, sons, Harry D., a 38 year old farmer, Thomas R., a 29 year old Grading contractor, grandson, Charles J., 6, grand-daughter, Mary, 4, and daughter-in-law, Mary, 29. Mary was the wife of Thomas J.. They had both married at the age of 21. Thomas J. and his children were from Nebraska. All the others, including Mary, were from Iowa. There was one servant in the house.

Charles died in 1942 and was brought home to be buried in Red Oak Cemetery, Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa. Eva was buried there too.

His children were,
(25) Harry Dewey Hysham (1897)
(25) Charles Russell Hysham (1899)
(25) Thomas R. Hysham (1901)

(25) Harry Dewey Hysham (1897)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Charles J. Hysham (1858)

The son of Charles J. and Eva Hysham. He was born on 20 November 1897 in Iowa. Later documents indicate the year was 1898, but that is too close to the birth of Harry's brother, Charles. In the 1900 census of Ranchester, Sheridan county, Wyoming as Harry D. Hysham [Hughan in Ancestry.com], 2 [November 1897].

In the census of 1910 for Omaha, Douglas county, Nebraska as Harry D. Hysham, 12.

Harry and brother, Charles Russell, registered for the draft in World War I on 12 September 1918. Harry was 20 years old. At the time he was a farmer, working for his father, and living in Omaha, Sarpy county, Nebraska. He was described as tall, of medium build, with blue eyes and brown hair, like his brother. This record shows that Harry was born on 20 November 1898.

In the 1920 census of Gilmore, Sarpy county, Nebraska as Harry D. Hysham [Hysharn in Ancestry.com], 22, living at home with his father. Sarpy county is just south of Omaha, but still on the Missouri river.

Harry did marry.

"Van Kirk, Leona M.; 23; md. Harry D. Hysham; 25; Nov 1922" - from "Omaha Marriages and Area Anniversaries"
However, by the time of the 1930 census they had divorced, apparently without children. Leona was born in about 1899.

In the 1930 census of Gilmore, Sarpy county, Nebraska as Harry D. Hysham [Hyson in Ancestry.com], a 38 year old farmer, living with his father. He was single.

In the 1940 census of Gilchrist, Morrill county, Nebraska as Harry Hysham, 42 laborer in a feed yard, of Wyoming. He was a boarder in the house of Fred Trenkle and shown to be single.

Harry D. Hysham of Douglas county, Nebraska, registered for the draft. He was a farm hand, born in Iowa, with 3 years of high school education. He was divorced, without dependents. He enlisted on 4 April 1942 at Fort Crook, Nebraska. He was 45 years old! What does a 45 year old do in the Army? Fort Crook is in Omaha, the current Offutt Air Force Base. He was released from the service on 9 June 1943.

He died on 27 January 1972, at the age of 73, in Gillette, Campbell county, Wyoming. There was an obituary written for Harry D. Hysham on 3 February 1972 noting that he was buried in the Mount Pisgah cemetery in Gillette. The obituary also mentioned his brother, Tom.

His tombstone indicates he was born on 20 November 1898, not 29 November 1897. He was noted to be a veteran.

(25) Charles Russell Hysham (1899)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Charles J. Hysham (1858)

The son of Charles J. and Eva Hysham. He was born on 7 January 1899 in Iowa. In the 1900 census of Ranchester, Sheridan county, Wyoming as Charles R. Hysham [Hughan in Ancestry.com], 1 [January 1899].

In the census of 1910 for Omaha, Douglas county, Nebraska as Charles R. Hysham, 11.

Charles attended the Nebraska Military Academy, right, and played Left/Right Guard on the football team. He was also attending Bellevue College when World War I broke out. In the 1914 City Directory of Lincoln, Nebraska, a student at the academy.

He registered for the draft in World War I on 12 September 1918 at the age of 19. At the time he was a farmer, working for his father, and living in Omaha, Nebraska. He was described as tall, of medium build, with blue eyes and brown hair. He was a Corporal in the transport corps during World War I.

In the 1920 census of Gilmore, Sarpy county, Nebraska as Chas. R. Hysham [Hysharn in Ancestry.com], 21, living at home with his father. Gilmore is just south of Omaha, near today's Offutt Air Force Base. It is on the Missouri river.

He died in 1922 and was buried in Evergreen cemetary, Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa.

"Omaha, June 23. - Charles Hysham, 23, ex-service man son of C. J. Hysham, wealthy ranch owner who resides at Walnut lodge, near Gilmore, was instantly killed when the automobile he was driving turned over, pinning him to the ground. The accident occurred while young Hysham was returning from Moorecroft, Wyoming, to his father's "H.A." ranch near there Tuesday morning. A blowout is believed to have caused the tragedy. The youth was a graduate of Frenam school in Omaha, Lincoln Military Academy of Lincoln and was attending Bellevue college when this country entered the war. He served a year in the transport corps, becoming a corporal; and was overseas for seven months. Since the close of the war he had been working on his father's ranches in western Nebraska and Wyoming." - from the Lincoln, Nebraska Star of 23 June 1922
I have no evidence that he ever married, except for the existence of Leona, below.

(26) Leona M. Hysham
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Charles J. Hysham (1858) (25) Charles Russell Hysham (1899)

Possibly the daughter of Charles J. Hysham. I have a Leona M. Hysham who married Herbert H. Polly in 1929 in Box Butte county, Nebraska.

(25) Thomas R. Hysham (1901)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Charles J. Hysham (1858)

The son of Charles J. Hysham and Eva K. Stimson. According to the California Death Index, he was born on 5 August 1901 in Nebraska. His mother's maiden name was Stimpson [sic]. In the census of 1910 for Omaha, Douglas county, Nebraska as Thomas R. Hysham, 8, born in Nebraska.

In the 1920 census of Gilmore, Sarpy county, Nebraska as Thomas Hysham [Hysharn in Ancestry.com], 18. Thomas was the only one born in Nebraska. Sarpy county is just south of Omaha, but still on the Missouri river.

Thomas married Mary A. Welsh, of Iowa.

"Welsh, Mary A.; 21; md. Thomas HYSHAM; 21; Jan 1923" - from "Omaha Area Marriages"
She was born on 23 November 1901 in Iowa. In the 1930 census of Gilmore, Sarpy county, Nebraska as Thomas R.. Hysham [Hyson in Ancestry.com], a 29 year old Grading contractor. He was living with his father. With him were his wife, Mary, 29, and children, Charles J., 6, and Mary, 4. Thomas and Mary had married at the age of 21. Thomas J. and his children were from Nebraska.

Mary Hysham, a nurse, was living in Omaha, Nebraska in the 1937, per the City Directory. She was working a the Creighton Memroal St. Joseph's Hospital and residing at RD 5 S. Omaha. Where was Tom?

In the 1940 census of . . .

Both Tom and Mary were still living in Omaha in 1941. Tom was a surveyor. They resided at 2740 South 10th street.

Thomas moved to California sometime after 1941. I haven't yet found a rationale for this move. Possibilities include taking advantage of aircraft production jobs in San Diego during World War II. Since he had been a "grading contractor" in Omaha, perhaps he took part in the post-war construction boom in San Diego.

Mary Hysham, Tom's wife, was listed in a 1943 directory of nurses, living at 2442 W. Jewett street, in San Diego. This is in the section of town known as Linda Vista. It was built in the early 40's to house Consolidated Aircraft company workers. It looks like she got her early training as a nurse at St. Joseph's Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska.

Tom Hysham, of Nebraska, died on 20 September 1985 in San Diego. Mary A. Welsh Hysham died 22 December 1986 in San Diego. They are buried in the Oak Hill Memorial Park, in Escondio, California.

Their children were,
(26) Charles James Hysham (1923)
(26) Mary Hysham (1926)


(26) Charles James Hysham (1923)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Charles J. Hysham (1858) (25) Thomas R. Hysham (1901)

Known as C. James Hysham. According to the California Death Index, he was born on 31 December 1923 in Nebraska. His mother's maiden name was Welsh. In the 1930 census of Gilmore, Sarpy county, Nebraska as Charles J. Hysham [Hyson in Ancestry.com], 6. Some time after 1941 he came to San Diego, California with his parents.

On 9 June 1945 Charles James Hysham mustered aboard USS SIBONEY, CVE 112. He was an AME-3C in the V-6 Division. An AME is an Aviation Mechanic. He remained aboard until at least 13 February 1946.

USS SIBONEY

A Commencement class escort carrier, she was named for a battle during the Spanish American War. She was commissioned on 14 May 1945, so Charles was probably a plank-owner.

Siboney completed fitting out on 23 May 1945 in the Seattle area, and on 31 May 1945, sailed for San Diego. She held shakedown operations in the Bay Area until 3 August. The carrier then loaded bombs, aircraft, and personnel from Air Group 36, and on 8 August departed for Pearl Harbor. Hostilities with Japan ceased the day before Siboney arrived, on 15 August, to discharge her cargo. She was in Hawaiian waters until early September when she sailed for Okinawa, via the Marshall, Caroline, and Philippine Islands.

On 5 October, she stood out of Buckner Bay for Honshu, Japan. En route, the carrier conducted air search operations in an attempt to locate Rear Admiral William Dodge Sample and his PBM Mariner, which had been missing since 2 October. Siboney called at Honshu from 8–11 October, and then continued the search for the missing Mariner, with negative results. The ship operated in the Tokyo Bay area from 24 October until 16 November 1945, when she was ordered to return to the United States. After port calls at Saipan, Manila, Hong Kong, Guam, and Pearl Harbor, she arrived at San Diego on 23 January 1946. The carrier deployed to the western Pacific again from 15 February-7 May. - from Wikipedia.com

I suspect that Charles left the Navy, going to college to earn a degree in Psychology, perhaps under the GI Bill.

He married Ellen Halm, apparently while still at school. She was born on 13 June 1921.

Charles re-entered the Navy as an officer. I have references to a Charles Hysham mustering at Parris Island, South Carolina with the Marine Corps from January 1957 to July 1958. He was a Navy Lieutenant Junior Grade and later Lieutenant. Note that the Navy provides the Marines with a medical staff.

Charles was a Clinical Psychologist and a Commander in the U.S. Navy, serving from 5 August 1956 to 31 August 1973.

"A Navy psychiatrist - known in the corps as a "talking doc" - agreed. Dr. C. J. Hysham, San Diego, Calif., is one of three psychiatrists and two psychologists attached to the recruit command. One of Hysham's jobs is to screen men being trained as drill instructor. He reported nearly 50 per cent are rejected." - from the "Utica Observer-Dispatch" of 7 April 1957
He gave testimony before Congress on psychiatric evaluations of military personnel. He also co-wrote, "Predictors Related to Premature Attrition of Navy Recruits," dated 1977. There is a James Hysham who was, in 1973, the co-author of a study for the Navy on recruit training performance. There are further studies by a C.J. Hysam, in the same field, in 2002 and 2004. Perhaps these just referenced his earlier works.

He died on 4 December 1984 in San Diego, predeceasing his parents, and was buried at Fort Rosecrans National Cemetary. Ellen Halm Hysham died on 24 April 2011. Her obituary,

"Hysham, Ellen Halm June 13, 1921 to April 24, 2011 Born in Piqua, Ohio, Ellen Hysham died peacefully with many members of her family by her side Easter morning at Scripps Mercy Hospital. She was married to Charles James Hysham who preceded her in death in 1984. A devoted and loved Mom to many, Ellen is survived by her children Susan, Leanne, Christopher, Vincent, her nine grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren." - from the San Diego Union
Their children were,
(27) Unnamed Hysham (1951)
(27) Susan Hysham
(27) Leeann A. Hysham
(27) James Christopher Hysham (1953)
(27) Vincent T. Hysham (1960)

(27) Unnamed Hysham (1951)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Charles J. Hysham (1858) (25) Thomas R. Hysham (1901) (26) Charles James Hysham (1923)

He was buried with his father at Fort Rosecrans. This infant was born and died on 9 July 1951.

(27) James Christopher Hysham (1953)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Charles J. Hysham (1858) (25) Thomas R. Hysham (1901) (26) Charles James Hysham (1923)

James Christopher Hysham was born on 28 September 1953 in San Diego county, California; mother's maiden name was Halm. He was living in Escondido, California in 1994. This is just north of San Diego. JC & LA Hysham were living in Oceanside, California in 2000. This is a beach community, just northwest of San Diego. A hugh Marine Corps base, Pendleton, lies to the north.

I have a Christopher Hysham who works for Cymer Inc., in San Diego. Also as J. Christopher Hysham. Cymer is a leading manufacturer of excimer lasers used in the semiconductor industry. He shares a patent for a discharge produced plasma EUV light source. Amazingly, I only just recently realized that his work address was next door to where my wife, Anita, was working on Thornmint Drive, in Rancho Bernardo. There is also a Cymer patent that clearly indicates this is James Christopher Hysham.

A J. Christopher Hysham is "associated with Psi Soft, Inc." of San Diego with the role of President.


There were also born in California the following, probably the (28) generation and children of the above:
(28) Charles Connor Hysham (1991), born on 9 December 1991 in San Diego county, his mother's maiden name was Depke. He attended Cathedral Catholic High School and the University of California at Santa Cruz Class of 2014. Called Connor.
(28) Thomas Alexander Hysham (1994), born on 1 February 1994 in San Diego county, his mother's maiden name was Depke. Thomas Hysham of the St. Patrick Parish School of Carlsbad, California was recognized by the Congressional Youth Leadership Council for academic achievement and leadership abilities in December 2006.

(27) Vincent T. Hysham (1960)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Charles J. Hysham (1858) (25) Thomas R. Hysham (1901) (26) Charles James Hysham (1923)

Vincent T. Hysham was born on 15 December 1960 in San Diego county, California; mother's maiden name was Halm. He graduated from Point Loma High School in 1979.

Living in San Diego in 2000. A member of the "Silent Electric Flyers of San Diego." They fly electric model aircraft. "A few visitors were recognized; Vince Hysham flying a. Kyosho Ferias, . . .", February 2001.

His wife may be Ellen H. Hysham, living at 4480 Hermosa Way, San Diego, California in 1994 & 2000. There is an Ellen Hysham Trust company in San Diego.

(26) Mary Hysham (1926)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Charles J. Hysham (1858) (25) Thomas R. Hysham (1901)

In the 1930 census of Gilmore, Sarpy county, Nebraska as Mary Hysham [Hyson in Ancestry.com], 4. She came to San Diego with her parents.

(24) Thomas Jefferson Hysham (1860)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832)

The son of Jacob A. Hysham and Julia Russell, he was born in Elkador, Iowa on 4 August 1860.

"Thomas J. Hysham, 1860-1940.

Thomas Jefferson Hysham was bon in Elkader, Clayton county, Iowa, on August 4, 1860, and died in Red Oak, Iowa, on January 2, 1940. At the age of fourteen years he moved to Red Oak with his parents and attended the public schools and was a member of the first graduating class of the Red Oak high school. After completing his high school course he taught school and then took the collegiate course at the University of Iowa where he was graduated in 1884. He was active in founding the Delta Tau Delta fraternity in the university and was a member of the Irving Institute. He studied law in the office of Smith McPherson and was admitted to practice in 1887. In his practice he was modest and unpretentious. His demeanor was as simple as his life and his advocacy as genuine as his character. His arguments, oral or written, were concise and conclusive, the product of research, thought, and study, for he was a prodigious worker and with a task to do he took pride in doing it well. He was a keen analyst and a profound reasoner. He never held public office but was active in politics and served as a delegate to the national Republican convention in Chicago in 1920 and the one held in Kansas City in 1928.

For many years he was a large stockholder in the First National Bank of Red Oak and after serving on its board of directors for many years was elected its president in 1937, which office he held until 1939.

. . . widely regarded as a patriotic, public spirited and highly respected citizen of his community. He was a member of several lodges and clubs and much of his time was devoted to civic and political affairs. He was well grounded and qualified for the work of his chosen profession, and gave great promise of having a successful career as a lawyaer, and was destined to become a leading citizen of Dubuque and a leader of the bar. In December 1939 he was stricken with a staphylococcus infection which ended his life on December 11, 1939."

- from "Annual Proceedings" of the Iowa State Bar Association
In the 1870 census of Boardman township, Clayton county, Iowa as Thomas Hysham 8. In the 1880 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Thomas, 19, living with his father.

Thomas graduated from Iowa State University in 1884, a member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He studied the law privately, with the Honorable Smith McPherson, and passed the bar in 1887. He was partner with F.E. Billings in general practice as Heysham & Billings. They were attorneys for C.B. & Q. Ry. Co., Red Oak Electric Co., Red Oak National Bank, and First National Bank, Red Oak.

Tom was in the National Guard in 1886.

"Roster of Iowa National Guard
. . .
Second Brigade
(Headquarters, Dubuque)
Charles S. Bentley, Brigadier-General Commanding . . .
. . .
Second Regiment
(Headquarters Centerville)
Henry H. Wright, Colonel commanding . . .
. . .
Company A
Name . . . Rank . . . Residence . . . Date of Commission.
. . .
Thos. J. Hysham . . . 2d Lieut. . . . Fairfield . . . June 25, 1885"
- from "Legislative Documents" of the Iowa General Assembly

In the state census of 1895 for Red Oak, Montgomery county as Thomas J. Hysham, living with his father. In the 1900 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Tom J. Hysham, a 39 year old attorney [August 1860], still living with his father.

On 24 August 1907 Thomas J. Hysham, 41, Red Oak City, of Elkader county, Iowa, the son of J.A. Hysham and Julia Russell, married Ada B. [Beatrice] Liddell [nee Habgood], 25, Toronto, of England, a widow, the daughter of Henry Habgood and Alice Ward. Ada's first husband, Dr. George Lawrence Liddell, died on 5 July 1900 in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada - from another researcher, Heather van Vonderen. Apparently Ada had a hard life. She was born in Londond in a very poor situation. She was sent to Canada as a Home Child in 1884.

In the 1910 census of Red Oak city, Montgomery county, Iowa Thomas J. was listed as a 49 year old lawyer in private practice. Living with him was Ada B., his wife, aged 32. In "A History of the County of Montgomery from the Earliest Days to 1906," Chapter XXIV, The Montgomery County Bar, "Of the practicing attorneys now doing business who have not been heretofore mentioned are T. J. Hysham, a safe counselor and attentative to important interests intrusted to him."

In the 1920 census of Red Oak as Thomas J. Hysham [Hyskam in Ancestry.com], a 58 year old lawyer. Living with him was his wife, Ada B., 30.

Thomas was a Republican politician and an alternate delegate to the Republican National Convention from Iowa in 1924. A history of Red Oak and Montgomery county has a picture of T J Hysham under the Montgomery county Bar Association sign.

In the 1930 census Thomas J. and Ada B. Hysham were 68 and 49, respectively, and still living in Iowa.

Tom died in Red Oak on 2 January 1940 - or died on 11 December 1939 and buried in January. Ada passed away in 1956. She was buried in the Red Oak Cemetery, Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa.

"Red Oak - Funeral services for Mrs. Ada B. Hysham, 80, were held Friday at the Sellergren Funeral Home here. She died at a Red Oak hospital Wednesday afternoon, where she had been a patient several months . . . Born Sept. 17, 1875, in London, England, she came to this country in 1884 and was married in Toronto, Canada to Tom J. Hysham in 1901. He died here in 1940. The only survivors are nieces and nephews." - from the Council Bluffs, Iowa Nonpariel of 7 September 1956.
Ada left a will "generous in bequests." The Murphy Memorial hospitial received $35,000 for a new wing. The Hysham house in which she and Tom had lived was willed to Red Oak and is now a town meeting place. The First Congregational Church received $2,000. There is also a Ada B. Hysham Memorial Golf Course in the town.

(24) Vernon Jackson Hysham (1865)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832)

He was the youngest son of Jacob, born on 16 August 1865 in Elkador, Clayton county, Iowa. In the 1870 census of Boardman township, Clayton county, Iowa as Vernon Hysham, 5. In the 1880 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Vernon Hysham, 14.

Vernon married Nancy Johnson on 11 September 1890 in Red Oak. In the state census of 1895 for Red Oak, Montgomery county as Vernon J. Hysham, 29, still living at home. Vernon's wife, Nancy, 24, was living there too. Nancy had been born in Montgomery county, Iowa.

In the 1900 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Verne Hysham, a 34 year old in stock raising [Aug 1863], and his wife, Nancy, 29 [May 1871]. Verne and Nancy had been married for 10 years and had one child, Philip Jacob, 2 [September 1897]. Verne was still living at home with his father and elder brother, Thomas J.

In the 1910 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Vernon J. Hysham, a 44 year old stockman/rancher. Living with him were his wife, Nancy, 38, and children, Phillip J., 12, Julia H., 8, Marjorie B., 1, and his father, Jacob A., 78. Jacob was shown as born in Virginia while his father, Vernon's grandfather, was born in Pennsylvania - the same was said in the 1900 census.

Vernon was living in Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa during the 1920 census, age 54, with Nancy, his wife, his son Philip, Julia and Marjorie. It says his fathers place of birth was West Virginia. His job appears to be a "stock buyer' which I assume refers to cattle. In 1922 a newspaper article mentioned that Mrs. B.J. Hysham and Miss Margarie Hysham visited Julia Helen Hysham at the University of Iowa. I suspect B.J. is an error for V.J.

In the 1930 census of Red Oak as Vernon J. Hysham [Hushaw in Ancestry.com] a 64 year old with no occupation. Living with him were his wife, Nancy, 58, and daughter, Marjorie, 20.

In the 1940 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Vernon J. Hysham, 68, of no occupation. Living with him was his wife, Nancy, 68.

Vernon died on 8 October 1945. He had been a cattle [stock] dealer. How does this relate to his brother's Charles J. and William being in Nebraska, Wyoming and Montana, apparently working closely with cattle ranchers? Nancy died on 7 May 1954 in Saratoga Springs, New York. I assume she was living with her daughter, Julia.

"Red Oak - Funeral services were Monday at Sellergren Funeral Home for Mrs Nancy Hysham, 82, Red Oak, who died May 7 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. She was a lifetime resident of the Red Oak community, but had been making an extended visit in New York . . . Surviving: a son Phil J. of Deposit, N.Y.; daughters, Julia of Saratoga Springs, N.Y.; four grandchildren; three great-grand-children; sister, Mrs. Mary L. Pierson of Florida; and one brother, Dave Johnson of Montgomery, Ala."- from the Council Bluffs, Iowa Nonpareil of 11 May 1954

His children were,
(25) Phillip Jacob Hysham (1897)
(25) Julia Helen Hysham (1901)
(25) Marjorie Bernice Hysham (1909)

(25) Philip Jacob Hysham (1897)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Vernon Jackson Hysham (1865)

Philip J. Hysham was born on 10 September 1897 in Red Oak, Iowa, the son of Vernon J. Hysham and Nancy Johnson. In the 1900 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Philip Jacob Hysham, 2 [September 1897]. Philip and his parents, Vernon and Nancy Hysham, were living with his grandfather, A.J. Hysham. In the 1910 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Phillip J. Hysham, 12. Philip was also in the state census of 1915, living in Red Oak.

Philip graduated from Red Oak High School, circa 1916.

Philip went to the University of Iowa, but left school to join the military, as a corporal. He apparently did this just before his Senior year. The University of Iowa yearbook of 1919 shows Phyl [sic] Hysham as a member of Kappa Sigma, a "Member in Service," that is, still with the Army. Philip J. Hysham returned and graduated from the University of Iowa in 1920 with a Bachelor of Arts degree.

In the 1920 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Philip J. Hysham, 22, with no occupation, though he had attended school within the last year. He was living at home with his parents, Vernon J. and Nancy Hysham.

He married Annette Girad Wheeler in 1922. She was born on 12 September 1899 in New York.

1922. "[Class of] '20--Phillip Hysham, of Red Oak, and Annete Wheeler, of New York City, were married on August 2. For the past two years Mr. Hysham has been with the Associated Merchandising Corporation." - from "The Iowa Alumnus" of 1922
Philip's occupation as a buyer kept him on the move, residing in Michigan, New Jersey, California and North Carolina.

In the 1930 census of Birmingham, Oakland county, Michigan as Phil J. Hysham, a 32 year old buyer for a retail dry goods shop. Living with him was his wife, Annette, 30, and daughter, Jane, 6.

"Hysham, Phil J., h, 320 Hawthorne rd, buyer, J.L. Hudson Co. Annette W., hswf." - from the 1930-1 Directory of Birmingham. Similarly, in the 1931 City Directory of Detroit, Michigan as "Hysham Philip J (Annette) buyer JL Hudson Co r320 Hawthorne rd (Bham)." J.L. Hudson ws a retail department store based in Detroit.

Philip then moved to New Jersey. In the 1935 directory of Montclair, Bloomfield county, New Jersey as "Hysham Philip (Anna) rem[ove] to Short Hills." The 1940 census, below, shows that Philip lived in Summit, New Jersey in 1935.

Philip Hysham, 38, of Red Oak, Iowa arrived in the port of San Pedro, near Los Angeles, California on 17 May 1936 aboard the PRESIDENT POLK. He had left from Brooklin, New York, though his previous address was listed as Summit, New Jersey. With Philip was his wife, Annette, 36.

In the 1940 census of Los Angeles, California as Phil Hysham, a 42 year old buyer for a department store, of Iowa. Living with him were his wife, Annette, 40, of New York, and daughter, Jane, 16, of Michigan.

I've also found a Phil J. and Jane Hysham in Vista, California newspapers of 1941 through 1952. Vista is in San Diego county, not far from Oceanside.

"Mr. and Mrs. P. J, Hysham are moving into their beautiful new home on Vista Heights near the Ray Potter residence. This is one of the choice residence sections in the future large city of Vista." - from "The Vista Press" of 27 February 1941
The following was from a news article on the 15th anniversary of the First National Bank of Vista.
"Other officers and directors of the institution are Frank M. Jorxes, vice president: Graham Rutherford, cashier; Charles H. Mull, Jr., assistant cashier; Robertz M. Gray, Phil J. Hysham. Frank M. Jones . . ." - from The Vista Press of 18 February 1943
Phil J. Hysham was an officer of the 1st National Bank of Vista in 1944. Annette Hysham was on an honor roll of supporters of the Palomar Memorial Hospital Building Fund in 1945.

Phillip's address was still in Vista in 1952 when he was listed as a Numismatist [coin collector]. Annette was a hobbyist as well.

Phil Hysham died on 22 June 1979 in Tryon, Polk county, North Carolina at the age of 81. Annette followed him on 1 June 1988 in Tryon, North Carolina. Both are buried in Polk Memorial Gardens cemetery. Philip's tombstone refers to him as a Major and cemetery records show him to be a veteran of both WWI and WWII. The latter must have been for service while in this country. This perhaps explains his residence in Vista, which is not far from the Pendleton Marine Corps Base.

Today there is a Phil J. Hysham, an Annette W. Hysham, and a Jane Hysham Willis scholarship that is awarded to graduating seniors in Polk county, North Carolina.

His daughter was,
(26) Jane Anne Hysham (1923)

(26) Jane Anne Hysham (1923)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Vernon Jackson Hysham (1865) (25) Philip Jacob Hysham (1897)

She was born on 9 December 1923 in Michigan. In the 1930 of Birmingham, Oakland county, Michigan, aged 6, and the 1940 census of Los Angeles, California, aged 16, living at home with her parents.

Jane graduated from Vista High School, in San Diego county, California, in June 1941.

In the City Directory of Colarado Springs of 1942 as "Hysham Jane Anne student CC r1103 Wood av." I suppose that CC stands for Community College.

She attended the Universtiy of Washington, where she was in the yearbook of 1944, aged 20. "Jane Anne Hysham, of Vista, received her Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Washington, Seattle, at the end of the short summer session." - from "The Vista Press" of 28 September 1944.

She married Nicholas William Willis, who was born on 19 May 1911. She was a teacher. He was a retired Army Colonel and teacher. Jane Anne Hysham wrote "Origins of the Russian Metallurgical Industry in Siberia" for the Journal of Asian Studies in 1947. This may have been her master's thesis at Berkeley.

Jane Hysham Willis died on 23 August 1998, aged 74, in Polk county, North Carolina.

There was a William Jeffrey Willis, born on 24 June 1950 in San Diego, whose mother's maiden name was Hysham, undoubtedly Jane.

(25) Julia Helen Hysham (1901)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Vernon Jackson Hysham (1865)

She was born on 13 August 1901 in Red Oak, Iowa, the daughter of Vernon J. Hysham and Nancy Johnson. In the 1910 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Julia H. Hysham, 8. In the 1920 census as Julia Hysham, living at home with her parents.

While studying at the University of Iowa in 1922 she was visited by Mrs. B.J. [sic] Hysham and Miss Marjorie Hysham of Red Oak. At the time of the state census of 1895 Julia Hysham, 23, was living back home again. She was shown to have attended 5 years of college, 9 months of which occurred in 1924.

Julia became a College Professor. She was mentioned in the "Directory of American Scholars," Sixth edition, Volume 2: English, Speech, & Drama, New York: R.R. Bowker Co., 1974, and in "Who's Who of American Women," First edition, 1958-1959, Wilmette, IL: Marquis Who's Who, 1958. One of her students remembered her fondly as one of the Skidmore College faculty.

In the 1928 city directory of Saratoga Springs, New York Julia Hysham was listed as an Instructor in English at Skidmore College. In 1929 she was shown to be a teacher. In 1939 she was an Assistant Professor. In 1941 she was an Associate Professor. In 1948 she was a full Professor.

In the 1930 census of Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county, New York as Julia H. Hysham, a 28 year old college teacher. I assume she was living on campus in a house reserved for single women teachers.

In the 1940 census of Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga county, New York as Julia Hysham, a 38 year old English teacher.

She wrote "Hawthorne's Novels," "Joseph Warton: A Biographical and Critical Study," and "Joseph Warton's Reputation as a Poet."

She was quite the traveler, having crossed the Atlantic a dozen times.

She died, at the age of 87, on 9 February 1989 in Sarasota, Sarasota county, Florida and was buried back home in Red Oak, Iowa in the Evergreen cemetary.

(25) Marjorie Bernice Hysham (1909)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Jacob A. Hysham (1832) (24) Vernon Jackson Hysham (1865)

She was born on 24 April 1909 in Red Oak. In the 1910 census of Red Oak, Montgomery county, Iowa as Marjorie B. Hysham, 1. In the 1920 census as Marjorie Hysham. In the 1930 census for Red Oak as Marjorie Hysham [Hushaw in Ancestry.com], 20, and still living at home.

She earned a BA in English, Summa Cum Laude from the University of Iowa. She married J. Gordan Eaker on 24 June 1933 in Red Oak. She was a High School English teacher and her husband was an English Professor at the University of Houston for twenty years. His PhD was from the University of Iowa.

She died on 31 January 1967 in Houston, Texas. They had three children, Julia Nancy Eaker, Joanne Louise Eaker and :

(26) John Hysham Eaker (1946)

He was born on 2 March 1946 in Pittsburg, Kansas. He married Susan Cook in July 1971 in San Marcos, Texas. He was a lawyer, listed in the "Who's Who in the South and Southwest" of 1984-1985.

(23) Stephen Hiram Hysham (1835)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804)

Sometimes known as Stephen Hyram, or Hyram S., or just Hiram. He was born on 28 May 1835 in Columbus, Ohio. In the 1850 census for Blanchard township, Putnam county, Ohio as Hiram Hesham, a 15 year old farmer, living with his mother, Lucinda, and siblings, Jacob, Elizabeth, and Margaret, all born in Ohio. His father was absent and probably dead. Lucinda led the family to Iowa, in company with her Guin brothers, sometime between 1850 and 1852.

Stephen, 23, married Amy Brooks, 23, on 18 October 1858 in Fayette county, Iowa. In the 1860 census of Elkador post office, Cox Creek township, Clayton county, Iowa as Henry [sic] Hashum, a 24 year old farmer, born in Ohio. Living with him were his wife, Anna [Amy], 24, of Canada, his mother, Lucinda, 51, born in Virginia, and son, Frankie, 10/12, who was born in Iowa.

He enlisted as a Private in Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment of Iowa on 22 August 1862 at the age of 27. At this date he already had two children, meaning that he did not have to enlist having no fear of being drafted. From a city newspaper of 12 August 1862,

"Recruiting.--This city is all ablaze with recruiting. There are some fifteen recruiting offices already and more are in contemplation. General Harrison has some sixty names on his roll. The general takes the right way to secure recruits. He is not like most of those who address war meetings and who make buncombe speeches."

21st Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment

The Regiment was organized at at Camp Frankin in Dubuque, Iowa in August and September 1862. They fought various actions in the western theater, in Missouri, Texas and Louisiana. They were the battles of Hartville, Port Gibson, Champion's Hill, and Black River Bridges, and in the Siege of Vicksburg and Jackson, Mississippi, all under the command of U.S. Grant during his early career.

Later they were in Major General Canby's campaign against Mobile, Alabama, taking part in the siege and capture of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely, and the occupation of Mobile.

They were mustered out of service on 15 July 1865. Note that all of their battles were Union victories. See 21st Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment for more information and background on their battles.

Stephen was in all the major battles and campaigns of the Regiment. He was promoted to Corporal and Sergeant,

Promoted to Full Corporal 8th Class on 11 April 1863
Promoted to Full Corporal 7th Class on 17 May 1863
Promoted to Full Corporal 6th Class on 26 May 1863
Promoted to Full Corporal 4th Class on 23 June 1863
Promoted to Full Corporal 2nd Class on 26 July 1863
Promoted to Full Corporal on 11 November 1863 (1st Corpl)
Promoted to Full Sergeant 5th Class on 01 May 1864
Promoted to Full Sergeant 4th Class on 06 October 1864
Mustered out on 15 July 1865 in Baton Rouge, LA
Note that Thomas J. & Samuel Hissem, in the West Virginia Volunteers, never advanced past Private.

In the 1870 census of Smithfield, Fayette county, Iowa as Stephen Hysham [Hyamough in Ancestry.com, though I have to give their people this, it does look like the census taker was very confused about the spelling.], a 36 year old farmer, of Ohio. Living with him were his wife, Amy, 36, of Canada, and children, Franklin, 10, and Elmira (known as Elmary), 9, both born in Iowa.

In the U.S. Indexed County Land Ownership Map of 1879 for Fairfield, Fayette county, Iowa as S. H. Hysham. Stephen had 57 acres in section 18.

In the 1880 census of Smithfield as Stephen Hysham, a 45 year old farmer, born in Ohio whose father was from Pennsylvania and his mother from Virginia. His wife was Amy, 45 years old, born in Canada. Their children are F.P., a 20 year old son [1860], a farmer born in Iowa, E.M., an 18 year old daughter born in Iowa, M.M., a 9 year old daughter born in Iowa. Medical information was taken during this census and it was noted, to Stephen's undying shame I'm sure, that he suffered from chronic diarea and Amy was generally debilitated.

Stephen moved his family to South Dakota sometime before 1890. In the 1890 Veterans Schedules for Huron township, Beadle county, South Dakota as Stephen H. Hysham. A Sergeant, in Compnay D, 21st Iowa Infantry, enlisted on 22 August 1862, mustered out on 26 [sic] July 1865, and served for a total of 2 years, 11 months and 2 days. He had a pension for chronic diarhea and internal piles.

Stephen was listed in the state census of 1890 and 1895 for Huron township, Beadle county, South Dakota. Living with him were his wife, Amy, and his son, Martin, in 1890, and daughter, Martha M., in 1895. Are Martin and Martha the same person, the result of a transcription error?

A Story of the Hysham’s In the Dakota Territory

“Henry Bassett, a son of Herman Bassett, who lived in Putnam township, repeats a story told him in Dakota in 1884 by Hiram Hysham [this is probably Stephen Hiram Hysham, below], then living about twenty miles northeast of Huron. His Hysham lived in or near the Brooks neighborhood, close to Corn Hill. "Cal" Perkins lived about a mile north of Taylorville. Hysham had a yoke of steers (oxen/z). Perkins, who had no team, arranged with Hysham to take them to mill, at Clermont, with corn, at Perkins' expense on the trip. They had nothing to eat but cold Johnnycake and they camped on the trip. Reaching Corn Hill on the trip home Hysham declared he was going to get a breakfast. Perkins wanted to go on home with the steers and leave Hysham, who threatened to "smash his head" if he did. After Hysham went into the sort of hotel being kept, and began to eat, Perkins came in, refused to sit at the table and have a breakfast but pulled out more frozen Johnnycake to eat." - from "Chats with Old Timers of Fayette County, Iowa" published in the Fayette Leader, 1938-1943.

Bassett figures this stop of Hysham and Perkins at Corn Hill to have been about 1844.”

The story above may indicate the existence of a Hiram Hysham, father to Stepehn Hiram Heysham, below, but more likely Henry Bassett got the dates wrong. Stephen Hiram Hysham had moved to Iowa at an early date and was still living there at the time of the 1880 census. He was, however, in Huron township, Dakota by the time of the 1890 census, so perhaps Bassett really meant 1884, vice 1844, in the story above. 1844 would have been an extremely early date for any settler to be in the Dakota territory.

Stephen apparently bought two farms in South Dakota. From "Beadle Co. South Dakota -- Federal Land Records,"

Name Meridian TWP Range Section Acreage Type Casetype DocID Date
HYSHAM STEPHEN H 05 113N 059W 017 160 251101 PA 5467 07/16/1890
HYSHAM STEPHEN H 05 113N 059W 020 160 251105 PA 1708 10/15/1895

Meridian: 05-located in the eastern part of Iowa [this is confusing] Type: 251000 - Disposition: Use and Occupancy, Homestead PA: Patent (i.e. not a grant deed)

Stepen was a member of the Huron “Kilpatrick Post”, No. 4, of the Grand Army of the Republic. This was an organization of Civil War veterans. The post was chartered by the Department of Iowa on 25 March 1882, and is still in existence (as of 1932). Its largest membership was 137 in 1891. Stephen H. Hysham was listed as a Sergeant, Co. D, 4 Iowa; 34 months (I think this was the number of months he was in the service).

In the 1900 census for Huron, Beadle county, South Dakota as Steven Hysham [Hersham in Ancestry.com], a 65 year old [May 1835] farmer. The census still showed him as married, for 42 years, but he was a lodger in the house of a carpenter whose name is difficult to make out, but it may be Charles [and Adelard] Phillips. That is, his daughter, Martha's, step-parents. He was shown as having gone the last 12 months without employment, which probably indicates a forced retirement. Franklin was living on his own at this time and Martha had married and moved to Iowa. I assume Elmira married before the move to South Dakota. That only leaves Amy, who must have died by this time.

Amy Hysham died sometime after 1895 and was buried in Beadle county - from Beadle county, South Dakota Burial Index. No date of death was on her tombstone, but it must have been before 1900.

In the 1910 census Stephen was living in Clear Lake, Cerro Gordo county, Iowa with his daughter, Martha, and her husband, Clarence Phillips. Stephen was a 74 year old widower, born in Ohio. His occupation was listed as "Draw Income." Note that Lucinda's poem had said of him that "Uncle Hiram went to South Dakota where he failed and lost, but tried." [was this poem actually written by Margaret Maria, Lucinda's daughter?]

Stephen died on 10 December 1910 while living in Clear Lake, Iowa with his daugther. Stephan, Amy and daughter Martha are interred in the Riverside cemetery in Huron. Stephan's mother, Lucinda, was buried in Lawrence cemetery in Yale, South Dakota. Stephan's children were,
(24) Franklin Pierce Hysham (1859)
(24) Elmira M. Hysham (1862)
(24) Martha M. Hysham (1870)

(24) Franklin Pierce Hysham (1859)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Stephen Hiram Hysham (1835)

I suppose Frank's naming reflects his father's politics. Frank was born in Elkader, Clayton county, Iowa on 25 August 1859, the son of Stephan Hiram Hysham and Amy Brooks. In the 1870 census of Smithfield, Fayette county, Iowa as Franklin Hysham [Hyamough in Ancestry.com] 10, born in Iowa. In the 1880 census of Smithfield as F.P. Hysham, a 20 year old farmer, born in Iowa, living with his parents, S.H. and Amy Hysham.

Frank accompanied his parents to South Dakota. He bought two farms and apparently sold a third. From "Beadle Co. South Dakota -- Federal Land Records,"

Name Meridian TWP Range Section Acreage Type Casetype DocID Date
HYSHAM FRANKLIN P 05 113N 059W 017 160 272002 PA 4808 06/05/1888
HYSHAM FRANKLIN P 05 113N 060W 012 120 251101 PA 5765 07/25/1898
HYSHAM FRANKLIN P 05 113N 060W 012 160 251105 PA 2235 12/27/1898

Meridian: 05-located in the eastern part of Iowa [this is confusing] Type: 251000 - Disposition: Use and Occupancy, Homestead 272000 - Sales, Cash PA: Patent (i.e. not a grant deed)
Stephen's farms, bought in 1890 and 1895 where in 113N 059W section 17. Perhaps the farm Frank sold in 1888 was one Stephen had originally purchased upon moving to South Dakota.

In the 1900 census of Milford, Beadle county, South Dakota as Franklin Hysham [Hytham in Ancestry.com], a 40 year old [August 1859] farmer. He lived alone with two servants, a farmer laborer who had come over from Switzerland in 1870, and his wife, who was probably a cook/maid.

In the U.S. Indexed County Land Ownership Map of 1906 for Milford township as F. P. Hysham. Frank owned section 12.

A newspaper clipping of a 50th anniversary party (for the Harkens, below) includes guests Hiram Hysham and Frank Hysham of Carpenter, South Dakota. That party would have been in 1907.

In the 1910 census of Sand Creek, Beadle county, South Dakota as Frank Hysham, a 50 year old single farmer, of Iowa. His father was born in Ohio and his mother was "Can English."

In the U.S. Indexed County Land Ownership Map of 1913 for Sand Creek township as Frank P. Hysham. Frank owned most of section 33.

In the 1920 census of Huron as F.P. Haysham [Hayshan in Ancestry.com], a 60 year old retired farmer. He was married, but no wife was shown.

Frank married Mattie Frances Smith on 27 April 1921.

In a 1926 Huron City Directory as "Hysham Frank P (Mattie) lab h 708 Michigan Avenue.

In the 1930 census of Huron as F.P. Hysham, a 70 year old teamster. Living with him was his wife, Mattie, 56 [1874], of Indiana. He's in the Huron, Beadle county, South Dakota 1931 phone book, a city subscriber, as Hysham F P r708 Michigan SW 3856. In the 1934 city directory of Huron Frank Hysham (Mattie F.) was listed as a gardener. In the 1938 directory Frank was listed as a farmer.

Frank P. and Martha F. Hysham were receiving old age assistance of $13.75 and $5.00 a month respectively according to the "Report of the Auditor," of South Dakota. I have a Martha [Mattie] F. Hysham who died in Beadle county on 27 September 1939.

In the 1940 census of Huron, Beadle county, South Dakota as Frank P. Hysham, an 80 year old widower with no occupation, of Iowa. Living with him was Mabel Parmenter, a housekeeper.

Frank died on 20 March 1943 in Beadle county, South Dakota.

(25) Violet Hysham (1911)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Stephen Hiram Hysham (1835) (24) Franklin P. Hysham (1859)

I don't see Violet in the 1920 census.

Violet Hysham, aged 18, was listed as a passenger on the SS CITY OF HONOLULU when it docked in Hawaii in 28 March 1930. She was shown as born on 4 June 1911 in Huron, South Dakota, though living at 213 west 77th street, Los Angeles, California. Whose daugher could she be, other than Frank's? On the other hand, Frank would have been 51 in 1911. Might Violet be adopted?

In the 1930 census of Honolulus, Hawaii as Violet Hysham, a 19 year old lodger at a hotel on 1124 Union street, of South Dakota, with no occupation. Her father was of Wisconsin [?] and her mother was of Ireland. This address corresponds with the Wolters building apartments which provided furnished rooms. The street is now little more than a paved pedestrian path, running diagonally from South Hotel Street, between Fort and Bishop streets, to South Beretania Street near Alakea Street. There is a Wolters building still existing in Honolulu, but this is a different structure on another street.

Violet married Alphie Terra. In the 1940 census of Los Angeles, Callifornia as Violet Terra, 28. She was living with her husband, Alphie, 28, and children, Richard, 9, William, 4, and Donna, 2.

Violet died in Downey, California on 21 April 1986.

(24) Elmira M. Hysham (1862)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Stephen Hiram Hysham (1835)

Known as Elmary, she was born on 9 April 1863 in Fayette, Iowa. In the 1870 census of Smithfield, Fayette county, Iowa as Elmira Hysham [Hyamough in Ancestry.com] 9, born in Iowa. In the 1880 census of Smithfield as E.M., an 18 year old daughter born in Iowa. She married Edward Baxter Bond in 1883. She divorced Edward before 1910 and married John H. Cowles of Carpenter, South Dakota. It looks like Elmary may have met John through her father or brother, who lived in Carpenter at the time.

Elmary died in October 1944 in Sioux City, Woodbury county, Iowa.

(24) Martha M. Hysham (1870)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804) (23) Stephen Hiram Hysham (1835)

She was born in July 1870 in Luana, Clayton county, Iowa. In the 1880 census listed as M.M., the 9 year old daughter of Stephen. Listed in the 1890 state census as Martin while in the 1895 state census as Martha, living with S.H. Hysham.

Martha Hysham, 28, married Clarence Phillips on 7 September 1897 in Beadle county, South Dakota - from the Beadle county Marriage Index (1881-1905). He was born on 14 June 1871 in Luana, Iowa. Had Clarence followed the Hysham's to South Dakota? Whatever the case, they had moved back to Iowa, to Afton township, in Howard county by 1900. M. Martha was 29 [July 1870]. Clarence was a carpenter, just like his father.

In 1910 they were living in Cerro Gordo county, Iowa. Stephen Hiram, 74, was rooming with them. Clarence died in San Jose, Santa Clara county, California on 9 February 1952.

(23) Elizabeth Hysham (c1837)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804)

Also Lydia or Libbie. Elizabeth was born in about 1837. In the 1850 census for Blanchard township, Putnam county, Ohio as Elizabeth Hesham, 12, living at home with her mother. She was born in Ohio. In the 1860 census of Elkader township, Clayton county as Elizabeth Hushem [Harshem in Ancestry.com], 21, shown as born in Virginia. She was living with her half-brother, Jacob. She married William H. Brooks on 30 November 1861 in Cox Creek, Clayton county, Iowa. William was born on 2 August 1829 in Elgin county, Ontario, the son of David Brooks. William was related to Stephen Hiram Hysham's wife, Amy Brooks, above. Elizabeth died before December 1868 in Cox Creek, when William married Rebecca Parmenteer. Elizabeth had no children.

(23) Margaret Maria Hysham (1841)
(19) Unknown Heesom (c1687) (20) Thomas Hesom (c1720) (21) Thomas Hissom (1750) (22) John Hissem (1804)

Or Margaret Marie. She was born on 29 September 1841 in Ohio. In the 1850 census for Blanchard township, Putnam county, Ohio as Margaret Hesham, 9, born in Ohio. Also known by the surname Hysum and Hushen. She married Andrew Harkin [Harken] on 16 July 1857. He was born 10 February 1832. Andrew and Margaret settled in Fayette County, Iowa. The Harkin's were Irish Catholics and Margaret took up the religion.

Andrew's father was John Harkin. He had married Hannora McClaferty in Ireland and in 1833 they left and immigrated to Canada. They had a son Andrew who married Margaret Marie Hysham.

From: "1878 History of Fayette County, Iowa," page 682,

"Harkin, Andrew, farmer, Section 2 (Smithfield Township); PO Fayette; was born in Ireland, February 10, 1832; came to this county in 1855; has 395 acres of land valued at $7,900. Politics Democrat. Married Margaret M. Hysham, July 16, 1857; she was born September 29, 1841; have ten children [other sources have as many as twelve] --- John A., born Nov. 30, 1858; William H., born Sept. 15, 1860; Margaret A., born Nov. 21, 1862; Charles H., born Feb. 23, 1864; Julia L., born July 4, 1867; Dixon A., born Sept. 21, 1869; Miranda H., born Feb. 10, 1872; Mary C., born Dec. 13, 1873; Rosa M., born Dec. 6, 1875; Maud A., born Dec. 21, 1877. Came to America when he was a child; went to Canada West, where he lived eighteen years; then went to Kane Co., Illinois, lived there four years; from there to this (Fayette county ) county, where he has resided since. Through careful management, he has made a comfortable home."

The Hysham name appears to have been mis-remembered as Hushen by at least one member of the family, so that is another avenue of investigation. Records of the Hysham's and Harkin's have also been found in the St. Joseph Catholic Church of Elkader, Iowa, so perhaps the family had become Catholic by this time, though this would be the first time I've heard of that.

Information I obtained from a family poem, above, states that Margaret came to Iowa from Ohio, as a child. Her father [John?] had died and with her mother Lavender [Lucinda?], two brothers [Stephen Hiram & Jacob?] and one other sister [Elizabeth?], they had a short stay [?].

In the 1870 census of Smithfield, Fayette county, Iowa, Margaret's mother, Lucinda, was living with Margaret and her husband, Andrew Harkin. Afterwards Lucinda went to South Dakota with her son, Stephen.

On 12 July 1907 Andrew and Margaret Harkin had their Golden Wedding Anniversary. Hiram Hysham, her brother, and his son, Frank, attended.

Andrew died on 1 March 1912 in Sheldon, Iowa. Margaret died on 1 March 1923, also in Sheldon, Iowa. She was buried at St. Patrick's cemetary, in Sheldon, O'Brien county, Iowa, plot blk 19, lot 1.

Steve Hissem
San Diego, California