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The Garnets of America

This family may be related to the Garnett's of Kirkby Lonsdale, but like the Heysham family, while a direct link has been postulated, it has not been proved. For an exhaustive family tree of this family, see The Home Page of John Ward. Look under the Surname Index, about halfway down the page, for 600+ Garnett entries in America and England. See also The Home Library of the Garnetts of "Elmwood" for an extensive background on the family in America.

(16) Thomas Garnett (1585)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555)

Thomas Garnett emigrated to Virginia and was amongst the earliest settlers in the Jamestown colonies. He arrived in Jamestown aboard the SWAN in 1610 – taken from “Hotten’s Lists.” The SWAN sailed from the port of London to the colony of Virginia. Thomas married Elizabeth Powell in 1618 in "Elizabeth Cittie," Virginia. Elizabeth was born about 1599 in Lancashire, England.

The Jamestown Colony

The Jamestown colony was founded by 108 men and boys in 1607 on an island, or penisula, in the James River, just upstream from the present cities of Hampton and Norfolk, Virginia. The island was chosen for its obvious advantages in defense, but the land was low and swampy. In 1698 the capital of the colony was moved seven miles upriver to Williamsburg, to find better farming land and a less restricted space, and then to Richmond, above the fall line to remove it from the threat of seaborne attack by the British during the revolution. Below is a 1624 view of Jamestown island.

The early years of the colony were extremely hard. Many of the colonists starved in the difficult year of 1609 and relations with the Algonquian Indians was poor. Of over 200 men who had by that time settled in the colony, only 60 survived when, in 1610, Lord De La War, the new Governor and Captain General of the Colony, arrived with 300 new settlers and much needed supplies, saving the colony from collapse [Thomas Garnett was part of a later group that also arrived in 1610]. In 1611 600 new colonists, including the first 20 women, arrived.

In 1612 the colony discovered the crop that would make their settlement viable, tobacco, and while there were many hard years to come, the colony's future was assured. In 1623 Jamestown and Bermuda were given a monopoly on the trade. In 1619 Dutch traders exchanged a cargo of African slaves for food. The Africans became indentured servants, similar in legal position to many poor Englishmen who traded several years labor in exchange for passage to America. The popular conception of a race-based slave system did not fully develop until the 1680's.

In 1620 women began arriving in the colony in substantial numbers, ending the colony's bachelorhood. At right is a replica of a Jamestown home of the period. In 1622 the Algonquians, disenchanted with the colony's growth, attacked outlying plantations, killing over 300 of the settlers, though a last-minute warning spared Jamestown. As a result of this and poor management by the Virginia Company, the King revoked their charter and Virginia became a crown colony in 1624. After the capital was moved to Williamsburg, Jamestown began to decline, disappearing completely by the 1750's.

Thomas' English origins have been the subject of inquiry by serveral researchers. There is agreement that he, and probably also his wife, likely came to America from Lancashire. This presupposes that the child he had in England, John, and perhaps his English wife as well, were left behind. Records of that county in England show that the Garnetts were settled there from at least the 12th century. The parish records for the church at Kirkby Lonsdale, Lancashire show a Thomas Garnett, son of Robert Garnett, baptised there and it could be the same Thomas that later migrated to America.

Thomas, at the young age of 25, made his way from England to the New World as an indentured servant, as did many others during the early years of the colony. The date for Thomas' arrival in Virginia was at a turning point in the history of the English colony at Jamestown. In 1609, Captain John Smith had returned to England and by 1610 the settlers had become discouraged. They planned to embark for England, but returned to Jamestown when they heard of the arrival of Lord Delaware with new colonists and fresh supplies. Among the arriving colonists in 1610 was our Thomas.

In what became known as the Great Massacre of 1622, a tribe of Pamunkey Indians attacked the Jamestown settlement killing 350 men, women and children and reducing the colony's population to 1050. Among the victims was the famous Mr. John Rolfe who had married the Indian Princess, Pocahontas, in 1616/17. Then, on 12 December 1622, the ship ABIGAIL docked with a load of infected passengers and the resulting epidemic reduced the colony to only 500 members. Afterwards a muster of the survivors was taken and recorded. In a "Muster of Inhabitants" taken on 20 January to 7 February 1624/5, Thomas Garnett was living at Elizabeth City, aged 40, having come to Virginia in 1610 in the good ship "Swan." Living with him were his wife, Elizabeth, aged 26, who came in the "Neptune" in 1618, and their young daughter, Susan, aged three.

Elizabeth City

Elizabeth City is on the north shore of the James river, at the eastern end of the Hampton penisula. It is today part of the city of Hampton, Virginia.

The term "Ancient Planter" is applied to those persons who arrived in Virginia before 1616, remained for a period of three years, paid their passage, and survived the massacre of 1622. They received the first patents of land in the new world as authorized by Sir Thomas Dale in 1618 for their personal adventure.

The 1618 date serves to identify Elizabeth as being among the very first women to arrive in the colony. Previously the settlers had almost all been men. In 1619 a boat load of young women arrived to become wives of the lonely settlers. Each settler gave the London Company 120 pounds of tobacco in payment for his wife's passage.

Thomas appears to have had a very colourful and distinctive personality. The following entry from the Journal of the House of Burgesses of Virginia dated Tuesday, August 3, 1619 reveals that he was most certainly a man of great spirit and boldness---and quite possibly also a "troublemaker" and rogue.

"...Captain William Powell presented to the assembly a petition to have justice against a lewd and treacherous servant of his, who by false accusation given up in writing to the governor sought not only to get him deposed from his government of James City, and utterly (according to the proclamation) to be degraded from the place and title of a Captaine, but to take his life from him also. And so out of the said Petition sprang the order following: Captain William Powell presented a petition to the General Assembly against one Thomas Garnett a servant of his not only for extreme neglect of his business, to the great loss & prejudice of the said Captaine, and for openly and impudently abusing his House, in full sight both of Master and Mistress, through wantonness with a woman servant of theirs, a widdowe, but also for falsely accusing him to the Governor both of Drunkenness, & Thefte, & besides for bringing his fellow servants to testifie on his side, wherein they justly failed him."

Further to this Petition by William Powell, the General Assembly, and the Governor himself, passed sentence upon Thomas Garnett that the said defendant "should stand four days with his ears nailed to the Pillory" [ouch] that is to say from Wednesday August 4th and for likewise Thursday, Friday and Saturday next following, and every of those four days should be publicly whipped. Clearly Thomas Garnett was indentured to Captain William Powell.

It is not evident how serious or true the accusations leveled by William Powell against Thomas actually were. The only testimony offered in the case came from William Powell himself, and he was known to be a drunkard and gambler. Furthermore, William Powell was well acquainted with the governor, played cards with him and allegedly lost his beautiful estate called Chippokes, on the James River, in a card game with the governor. Such comradeship between Captain Powell and the governor would not likely ensure fair treatment for Thomas against the word of his accuser.

There is another reference that implies this may have been a more general 'rebellion' by a number of William Powell's indentured servants, led by Thomas. Thomas was then banished to Elizabeth City. Yet another site makes the assumption, that since Powell was a tobacco planter, that Thomas worked in the tobacco fields.

Captain William Powell

William Powell was born in about 1577 (or possibly 1585) in St. Olave Parish, Surrey county, in England. He emigrated to the Virginia colony in 1607 or 1608. In 1617 Governor Samuel Argall appointed William to be "Captain of his guards and company, Lieutenant Governor and Commander of James Town blockhouses and people there." This was a life appointment. He was spoken of as a man of character and worth, "a gentleman of great name and fortune." He was one of the largest planters in the colony and represented James City in the First House of Burgesses of Virginia, which assembled in the choir of the Jamestown church at Jamestown on 30 July 1619." In late January or early February of 1623, William was ambushed, killed, and beheaded by the Chickahomony indians.

Fifteen years later, Thomas' status in life had undergone a tremendous change for the better. By that time, he was no longer an indentured servant but had become a land owner in his own right. The obtaining of land in the American wilderness was a unique process in the early days of the English settlements. Nobody came to America and purchased land. Even if that had been possible, nobody had any money to buy it with. Up to the year 1634 there was no county organization in the colony. The London Company had restricted all landholding to small patches except for larger grants that may have gone to officers and friends of the company. Some grants to free colonists were made as early as 1619, the year of Thomas' encounter with the Virginia House of Burgesses for the defamation of Captain William Powell, but this was the first representative assembly called together in America and Thomas Garnett's case came before the House in the first year of its existence.

In the Land Office at Richmond in Grant Book Number 1, page 201 is recorded the patent from Governor John West under the date of 3 July 1635 granting to Thomas Garnett 200 acres of land lying along the Little Poquoson Creek in Elizabeth City County near the present city of Hampton. The land was granted to Thomas Garnett due to his initiative in transporting four colonists to Virginia at his own expense [he received 50 acres for each]. See Nugent, "Cavaliersand Pioneers", Volume I, page 24. At almost the same time as Thomas Garnett acquired his 200 acres in Elizabeth City County, Thomas Vicount also patented land in the same area. Vicount's land was described as adjoining land owned by John Garnett and near to land of Thomas Garnett and John Moore. Although the early records have been lost, we know from the Vicount deed that John Garnett was already a land owner on property adjacent to the Vicount holding. It is likely that this John Garnett was the son of Thomas Garnett who dwelt close by.

"There is some evidence in the early land records of the Virginia colony that helps to confirm that in addition to the one daughter named Susan, Thomas Garnett may also have had two younger sons named John Garnett and Thomas Garnett, both born at some point after the 1624/25 muster was recorded." - From Doug Garnett on Garnett-L@rootsweb.com

Note: The problem with identifying the John Garnett who held land adjacent to that of Thomas Vicount in 1635, as a son of Thomas Garnett is that the muster of 1624/25 lists only one child for Thomas and his wife Elizabeth, Susan Garnett age 3 yrs. For John Garnett to have been his son and born following the taking of the Muster Roll he would have been at most an eleven year old land holder. Even if we assume John was missed on the muster, for reasons unknown, if Elizabeth, his mother, didn't come to the country until 1618, he could be no older than 16 in 1635. A more likely explanation is that Thomas had a brother, John, who came to the colony sometime after the muster was taken, perhaps drawn by Thomas' glowing description of the opportunities available. That being said, the children below, excepting Susan, may be the descendents of either Thomas or John.

From what I have read, the Garnett family of Virginia does not recognize Thomas Garnett as their ancestor. They state, "The earliest Garnett from whom descent at this time can be traced is John Garnett to whom under date of April 16, 1673 the governor, Thomas Lord Culpeper, issued a grant of 260 acres of land lying on the sourth side of Garden Creek in Gloucester County, between lands of John Smither and John Diggs."

(17) Susan Garnett (1620)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585)

She was born in 1620 in Elizabeth city county. She married Richard Foster about 1642 in Elizabeth City.

(17) John Garnett (c1625)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585)

He was born about 1625 in Jamestown, Elizabeth City county, Virginia. He died after Apr 1703 in Gloucester county, Virginia. He married unknown about 1648 in Elizabeth City.

(18) Thomas Garnett (c1650)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625)

He may be the son of John.

(18) John Garnett (c1648)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625)

He may be the son of John. He was born about 1648 (or 1652?) in Elizabeth City, Virginia. He died on 12 November 1703 (or 1743) in Kingston Parish, Gloucester county, Virginia. Another source shows his date of death as 1709. Of Gloucester, later Essex county, Virginia. A "supposed immigrant," who could not trace his parentage in England, but thought to be from Lancashire. He married Ann (Taylor?) in about 1670 in Essex county.

He was granted 260 acres of land lying on the southside of Garden Creek in Gloucester County by the Governor, Thomas Lord Culpeper, on April 16, 1683-Grant Book 7, page 239.

Gloucester County

Glouscester county, called York county when it was first formed in 1651, lies north of the York river, which is the next river north of the James, and encompasses the peninsula's eastern tip. When the English settlers first arrived at Jamestown, the Indian fortress of Chief Powhatan was located in the Gloucester region. Land patents were granted as early as 1639, but these lands were not considered safe for settlement until after 1644. George Washington's father received a land patent in the area in 1650.

The lands were a major tobacco producing area in the 17th and 18th centuries and many fine mansions were built during the period.

At some point John moved northwest into Essex county, on the Rappahannock river. The Garnett's were to remain here for many generations to come. In the Order Book of 1692-1695, on page 84, for Essex County there is recorded a deed by John Baker of Kingston Parish, Gloucester County to John Garnett of said Parish and County, a planter. By this deed, John Baker conveyed to John Garnett 600 acres of land in Essex County. This land transfer indicates that John Garnett had been one of the lucky ones to survive a very difficult period in the history of the Virginia colony and had become one of the most prosperous planters of this early era. The will of John Garnett was probated on 11 March 1713 in the Essex county court. It names as executors: Thomas Garnett (another son or a grandson?) and William Taylor.

Essex County

The next river north of the York is the Rappahannock. Essex county is on the south side of this river.


(19) John Garnett (c1671)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648)

He was born in about 1671 in Kingston parish, Glouscester county, Virginia. He died on 11 March 1773 in St. Annes parish, Essex county, Virginia. He married Ann. Another source shows him dying on 11 March 1712 in St Annes parish, Essex county at the age of forty.

(20) James Garnett (1692)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671)

He was born on 17 January 1692 in Gloucester county, Virginia and died on 27 May 1765. Justice of Essex, Member of the House of Burgesses. His will was probated in Essex County on 25 July 25 1765. He was said to have married three times. He married Sarah Green in 1716.

(21) John Garnett (1717)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692)

He was born on 27 September 1717 in Essex county. He died on 15 February 1745 in Essex county. He married Elizabeth Evans in 1744.

(22) Francis Garnett (1745)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692) (21) John Garnett (1717)

He was born in about 1745 and died in 1766. He married Elizabeth in about 1749(?).

(22) Henry Garnett (1747)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692) (21) John Garnett (1717)

He was born in about 1747 and died in 1811. He married Margaret in 1769.

(22) Augustine Garnett (1749)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692) (21) John Garnett (1717)

He was born in about 1749 and died on 16 October 1786. He married Elizabeth in 1722.

(23) Robert Garnett (1774)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692) (21) John Garnett (1717) (22) Augustine Garnett (1749)

He was born in about 1774. He married Elizabeth Clark on 5 July 1818 in Virginia.

(23) Augustine Garnett (1776)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692) (21) John Garnett (1717) (22) Augustine Garnett (1749)

He was born in about 1776.

(23) Frances Garnett (1779)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692) (21) John Garnett (1717) (22) Augustine Garnett (1749)

He was born in about 1779.

(23) Philadelphia Green Garnett (1783)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692) (21) John Garnett (1717) (22) Augustine Garnett (1749)

He was born in about 1783. I cannot explain his peculiar name.

(21) James Garnett (1719)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692)

He was born on 5 October 1719 in Essex county. He died on 23 February 1744.

(21) Thomas Garnett (1722)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692)

He was born on 19 January 1722 in Essex county. He died on 11 March 1737.

(21) William Garnett (1727)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692)

He was born on 11 July 1717 and died on 21 Febraury 1759 in Essex county. He married Ann Rouzie on 29 June 1751.

(21) Rubin Garnett (1729)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692)

He was born on 15 June 1729 and died on 7 October 1749 in Essex county.

(21) Robert Garnett (1732)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671) (20) James Garnett (1692)

He was born on 20 May 1732 in Essex county.

(20) John Garnett (1694)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671)

He was born in about 1694 in St Annes parish, Essex county, Virginia.

(20) Anthony Garnett (1697)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) John Garnett (c1671)

He was born in about 1697 in St Annes parish, Essex county, Virginia. He died, date unknown, at St Marks parish, Spotsylvania county, Virginia. I'd like to think that his name shows a family connection to (14) Anthony Garnett, but its many generations.

(19) Anthony Garnett (c1673)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648)

He was born in about 1673 and died about 1709 in Gloucester county, Virginia, before attaining maturity. In a deed of June 8, 1709, recorded in the Essex County Deed Book Number 13, page 225,

". . . in consideration of the 3,500 pounds of tobacco Thomas Garnett conveys unto John Foster, 50 acres of land on the south side of the Rapphannock River, being part of the tract of 600 acres purchased by John Garnett, deceased from John Barker, lying on the Rappahannock River near Moseley's Quarter and more particularly the said Thomas Garnett's share of the 150 acres which John Garnett had by his last will, dated November 12, 1703, given to his son, Anthony Garnett, who having died before he attained the age of twenty-one years, his share did then by right belong to the surviving children of the said John Garnett."

(19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648)

His first name may actually be James. He was born in 1675/6 in Kingston Parish, Gloucester county (or Stafford or Westmoreland county?), Virginia and died on 20 December 1748 in Essex county. He married, firstly, Elizabeth before 1700, and then Elizabeth Muscoe in about 1704. She was the daughter of Salvator Muscoe, who was born on 28 December 1674. She died on 23 August 1736. Both James Garnett and Salvator Muscoe were members of the House of Burgesses of Virginia from Essex County and Vestrymen of St. Anne's parish.

Salvator Muscoe Sr. was originally from Italy and was a stone cutter by trade. Salvator Muscoe had moved from Italy to London, England after the great fire of 1666 had destroyed much of that city. His skill as a stone cutter was employed in the rebuilding of the city and he worked under the direction of Sir Christopher Wren in the construction of St. Paul's Cathedral. Salvator Muscoe Sr. emigrated from London to Virginia in about 1685 and was a neighbour to the Garnett family then living in the colony. His daughter Elizabeth married Thomas.

In a deed of 8 June 1709, recorded in the Essex County Deed Book Number 13, page 225, the grantor, Thomas Garnett, of St. Anne's Parish, Essex, planter, is described as "one of the sons and devisees of John Garnett, late of the Parish of Kingston, in the county of Gloucester."

Thomas moved from Gloucester in Essex and took up his residence in St. Anne's Parish. It appears that Thomas very likely had 2 wives names Elizabeth, and that his son Anthony was the only child born to the 1st Elizabeth. His third marriage may have been to Mary Rowsee Jones.

(20) James Garnett (1708)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6)

He was born in Stafford, Virginia in 1708. He died in 1776 at the age of 68.

(20) Anthony Garnett (1708)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6)

He was born in St Anne's parish, Essex county, Virginia and died in 1784 in Lincoln county, Kentucky. Other sources say in July 1803 in Culpepper county, Viriginia at the age of 94. He married Elizabeth Jones Bowler, the widow of John Bowler.

"To All Christian People Anthony Garnet and Elizabeth his Wife of the County of Essex in consideration of a Release made by Susanna Bowler acknowledged in Essex County Court dated the 18th day of August 1733 do absolutely release said Susanna Bowler of Parish an County aforesaid of all manner of Dower and Right of Dower which they the said Anthony Garnett and Elizabeth his Wife late Widow and relict of John Bowler late of the aforesaid Parish and County Decd Brother to the said Susanna partie to these presents parties first above named have hereunto sett their hands and affixed their seals this 20th day of August 1733."
In the presence of Salvator Muscoe, Anthony Garnett. Essex County Deed Book 20 - pge 16-18. Note: Elizabeth Jones Boulware Garnett and Anthony Garnett had at least one child; Elizabeth Garnett born 16 April 1744 in Virginia. She married William Willis born 22 Feb 1743 in Culpeper Co, VA. Descendants of this family lived in Culpeper Co, Adair County, Ky and Shelby Co, Ky.

(21) Robert Garnett (1736)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Anthony Garnett (1708)

He was born on 31 December 1736 in St Anne's parish, Essex county and died on 30 December 1830 in Cumberland county, Kentucky. He married Lucy Towles in 1755 in Virginia.

(22) Oliver Garnett (1760)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Anthony Garnett (1708) (21) Robert Garnett (1736)

He was born in 1760 in Culpepper county. He died in Mercer county, Kentucky at a date unknown.

(21) Thomas Garnett (1737)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Anthony Garnett (1708)

He was born in 1737 in Culpepper county and died in Cumberland county, Viriginia. Married unknown.

(21) James Garnett (1743)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Anthony Garnett (1708)

He was born in November 1743 in St Anne's parish and died in Lincoln county, Kentucky.

(21) John Garnett (1747)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Anthony Garnett (1708)

He was born in 1747 in St Marks parish, Culpepper county.

(21) Ruben Garnett (1753)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Anthony Garnett (1708)

He was born on 27 July 1753 in St Anne's parish, Essex county.

(20) John Garnett (1715)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6)

He was born between 1702-1715. He died in 1772. He married Mary Fogg.

(20) James Garnett (1708)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6)

He was born in 1708 and died in 1776. He married Sarah Taylor. Not corraborted by other sources.

(20) Thomas Garnett (1723)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6)

He was born between 1713-1723 and died in 1780 or 89. He married Rachel Wilson.

(20) Muscoe Garnett (1736)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6)

Of “Mount Pleasant,” St Anne's parish, Essex county, Virginia. He was born on 17 August 1736. On 9 July 1767 he married Grace Fenton Mercer. She was born on 20 February 1750.

She was the daughter of John Mercer of Marlboro, Stafford county, Virginia, the author of “Mercer's Abridgement of the Laws of Virginia.” He was born on 6 February 1704 in Dublin, Ireland and emigrated to Virginia in 1720. He married, firstly, Catherine Mason on 10 June 1725. Next he married Ann Roy on 10 November 1750. She died on 14 October 1768. Grace was the sister of the Honorable John Francis Mercer, Member of the Continental Congress, Member of the Constitutional Convention, 1787, and Governor of Maryland, from 1801 to 1803.

Through her mother, Emily Dennis Hayward, Grace was descended from many of the early colonists, among them Sir George Yeardley, Governor of Virginia in 1618; Colonel Nathaniel Littleton of His Majesty's Council; Colonel Obedience Robins, 1600-1662, Chief Magistrate of Northampton County; Captain Adam Thoroughgood of the Virginia Council, 1639-1640; Captain Edward Waters, 1610, and Ensign Thomas Save, who was the first white settler on the Eastern Shore of Virginia and who came to the Colony with Captain Christopher Newport in January, 1608.

The Garnett's Elmwood estate, overlooking the Valley of the Rappahannock River, was built in the mid 1700s by Muscoe Garnett for his son, James Mercer Garnett. The estate comprised 1,000 acres and the huge house was described as one of the finest in the colony. From The Virginia Landmarks Register, “The wealth and influence of the Garnet family in the 18th century is illustrated by Elmwood, one of the most ambitious of Virginia’s colonial mansions." The imposing Georgian house, laid in Flemish bond, is 100 feet long and 30 feet wide with three stories over an English basement. flanked by twin chimneys and adorned with 20 windows, 10 on each floor. The main hall was 20 feet wide, leading to cross halls, each 10 feet wide and 20 feet long. A molded water table bands the entire foundation. The hipped roof is broken by dormers and by a central projecting pavilion on the front entrance with a second floor Palladian window. Hall woodwork was elegant black walnut, hand-carved and in natural finish. At the cross hall entrances there were arches that have been called the finest work of colonial architects. Wood work in the house is thought to be by William Buckland. The elaborately paneled ballroom foreshadows Buckland's magnificent work in Annapolis. In the mid years of this century, the Garnetts undertook an extensive restoration, removing an 1851 stair tower, which had been added to the left of the main entrance, and Victorian porches on each side. Riverside and garden doorways were designed by architect Charles E. Spencer to replace the Victorian ones. Mr. and Mrs. Muscoe R. H. Garnett Jr., owners.

From "Selected, Entries, Vol. 28-29, Circuit Court Order Books, 1773-1783 - Essex Co. Virginia," p. 229, May 1774:

"The Court ordered that Muscoe Garnett pay to John Loyd 50 lbs. of tobacco for attending court 2 days as a witness for him in a suit against Archibald McCall. Ordered that Archibald McCall pay Thomas Loyd 250 lbs. of tobacco for attending court 10 days as a witness for him against Muscoe Garnett."

Muscoe was a member of the Committee of Safety and Correspondence of Essex county, Virginia, from 1774 to 1775. He died in January 1803. His wife, Grace, died on 4 June 1814.

(21) James Mercer Garnett (1770)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736)

An agricultruist and politician. He was born in Mount Pleasant, Essex county, Virginia on 8 June 1770. His brother was Robert Selden Garnett, below. He studied under private teachers.

He was a member of the House of Delegates of Virginia from 1799 to 1800. After serving for several years in the Virginia legislature he was twice elected to the National house of representatives, and served from 2 December 1805 to 3 March 1809. He was a member of the grand jury that indicted Aaron Burr, former Vice President, for treason in 1807. He acted with the Democratic party and engaged in a controversy with Matthew Carey, the protectionist. He was an intimate friend of his colleague in Congress, John Randolph, of Roanoke. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1808. He was again a member of the State house of delegates in 1824 and 1825 and a member of the anti-tariff conventions of 1821 and 1831. He was a delegate to the State Constitutional Convention from 1829 to 1830, also of P. E. Diocesan Conventions of Virginia.

He was a founder and the first president of the United States agricultural society, and wrote extensively on rural economy. President of the Fredericksburg Agricultural Society 1817-1837He was also interested in educational progress, maintained a female seminary in his own house for twelve years, and was active in introducing into Virginia improved methods of instruction.

He married Mary Eleanor Dick Mercer on 21 September 1793. She was born on 4 October 1774 and died on 11 April 1837. She was the daughter of James Mercer who was born on 26 February 1736 and died on 31 October 1793. James Mercer was a member of the House of Burgesses of Virginia from 1765 to 1774, of the the Virginia Conventions of 1774 to 1776, the Committee of Safety from 1775 to 1776, the Continental Congress of 1779 to 17780, Judge of the General Court from 1780 to 1789, and of the Court of Appeals of Virginia from 1789 to 1793.

Vice President of the Virginia Colonization Society. He died on his estate, “Elmwood,” near Loretto, Virginia on 23 April 1843. He is interred in the family burying ground on his estate.

(22) James Mercer Garnett (1794)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) James Mercer Garnett (1770)

He was born on 30 October 1794 and died on 14 July 1824. He married Maria Hunter on 7 March 1820.

(23) Muscoe Russell Hunter Garnett (1821)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) James Mercer Garnett (1770) (22) James Mercer Garnett (1794)

A politician. I'm not sure which of James Mercer Garnett's sons was his father, but Muscoe was a grandson of James Mercer Garnett (1770). He was born at Elmwood, near Loretto, in Essex county, Virginia on 25 July 1821. He was tutored at home and then attended the University of Virginia at Charlottesville. He graduated from the Literary department in 1839 and the Law department in 1842. He was admitted to the bar and practiced at Loretto, Virginia.

A Democrat and a Delegate to the Virginia state constitutional onvention from 1850 to 1851. He was a delegate to the Democratic national conventions of 1852 and 1856. A member of the Virginia state House of Delegates from 1853 to 1856. He was a member of the board of visitors of the University of Virginia from 1855 to 1859. He was then elected to Congress from Virginia's 1st District to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Thomas H. Bayly, and twice re-elected, serving from December 1856 to March 1861.

He was a delegate to the Virginia secession convention and to the State constitutional convention in 1861. Representative from Virginia in the Confederate Congress from 1862 to 1864. He died in office in 1864 after contracting typhoid fever while attending the Confederate Congress, in the Virginia State Capital of Richmond, Virginia, and died at his home at Elmwood on 14 February 1864. He is intered in the family cemetery on his estate.

(22) Albert Roy Garnett (1800)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) James Mercer Garnett (1770)

He was born on 28 February 1800 and died on 23 February 1852. He was unmarried.

(22) Charles Fenton Garnett (1810)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) James Mercer Garnett (1770)

He was born on 7 October 1810 and died on 6 March 1886. He was unmarried.

(22) Theodore Stanford Garnett (1812)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) James Mercer Garnett (1770)

He was born on 18 (12?) November 1812 at Elmwood, Essex County, Virginia and died on 28 May 1885. He married Florentina Isidora Moreno on 18 April 1839. She was born on 4 April 1822, the daughter of Francisco Moreno of Pensacola, FlOrida. Arms–Gules, a lion rampant, argent, ducally crowned within a bordure dovetail or; on a canton of the last a cross pattée fitchée of the field.
Crest–A dexter hand holding up a swan's head and neck, erased, proper.
Motto–Diligentia et honore.

Residence–1316 Bolton Street, Baltimore, Md. Clubs–University, Churchman's, Men's Club of Memorial P. E. Church; Baltimore, Md. Societies–Army of Northern Va. Assn.; Com'd'r John Bowie Strange Camp, U. C. V., Va.; Vice Prest. Confederate Army and Navy Society in Md.; Adjutant and Lieut. Commander Franklin Buchanan Camp, U. C. V., of Md.; Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, Phi Beta Kappa Soc.; Vestryman of Christ Church, Charlottesville, Va.; Vestryman of Memorial P. E. Church, Baltimore; member of P. E. Dioce****an Council of Virginia; member of P. E. Diocesan Convention of Maryland; member Gen'l Convention of P. E. Church from Virginia, 1895 and 1898.

Theodore S. Garnett, Sr., who occupied a prominent position in the South as a railroad man and civil engineer, was born on the 12th of November, 1812, at "Elmwood," Essex County, Va. His father was James Mercer Garnett, and his mother, before her marriage, was Miss Mary Eleanor Dick Mercer, daughter of the Hon. James Mercer, who was for so many years a distinguished member of the Virginia bench. On his father's side he was descended from John Garnett, of Gloucester County, Virginia, one of the earliest of the colonial settlers, and on his mother's side from the Mercers who came from Scotland, among the most distinguished of whom was John Mercer of Marlboro, Stafford County, Virginia.

His early education was obtained from private tutors at "Elmwood," and from the Rumford Academy. He was thus prepared to enter the University of Virginia, which he did in 1828 while the University was still in its infancy. That session and a part of the next he spent at the University, but was compelled to leave during the session of 1829 on account of the illness of his brother Charles, whom he took home and nursed back to health. For a few years he devoted himself to farming in Mason County, near Point Pleasant, and then began the study of civil engineering. He soon acquired the reputation of being a skillful engineer, and received a position with the Philadelphia, Reading & Pottsville Railroad, and subsequently with the Richmond & Petersburg Railroad. After a visit to Texas in the interest of the land claims of the Texas Association, he became the chief engineer of the Columbia & Charlotte Railroad. In 1852, after service as an engineer in Kentucky, he became assistant to General Gwynn, on the North Carolina Railroad, of which he afterwards became Superintendent. In 1857 he was elected chief engineer of the railroad from Tallahassee to Fernandina. In 1858 he retired to his estate at Cedar Hill, in Hanover County, Virginia, where he lived until 1877, when he removed to Norfolk to spend the last years of his life with his son in that city. During the Civil War he was an ardent supporter of the Confederacy, and though too old for active service served on the field at Seven Pines.

On the 18th of April, 1839, at Pensacola, Florida, he married Miss Florintina I. Moreno, who still survives him (1904). He left three children—James Mercer Garrett, the educator; Theodore S. Garnett, a distinguished lawyer of Norfolk; and Miss Ella Isidora Garnett.

Of him and his distinguished brother, Charles Fenton Mercer Garnett, it may be said that they were the pioneers of railroad construction in the South. Each of them achieved eminence in his professor, and was noted in his time for skillful work and honorable character. He died on the 28th of May, 1885.

(23) Theodore Stanford Garnett (1844)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) James Mercer Garnett (1770) (22) Theodore Stanford Garnett (1812)

He was born on 28 October 1844 in Richmond, Virginia and died on 27 April 1915 in Norfolk. He married, first, Emily Eyre Baker on 25 October 1873, who died on 23 February 1876. Their child was Theodore Stanford III. Second he married Louisa (Smith) Bowdoin on 28 July 1885.

(24) Theodore Stanford Garnett (1875)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) James Mercer Garnett (1770) (22) Theodore Stanford Garnett (1812) (23) Theodore Stanford Garnett (1844)

He was born on 8 September 1875. He married Eleanor Colville Randolph on 25 April 1901.

(25) Theodore Stanford Garnett IV

(23) James Mercer Garnett (1840)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) James Mercer Garnett (1770) (22) Theodore Stanford Garnett (1812)

He was born at Aldie, Loudoun county, Virginia on 24 April 1840. He married Kate Huntington Noland at Middleburg, Virginia on 19 April 1871. She was the daughter of Major Burr Powell and Susan Chapline (Wilson) Noland, his wife.

A Philologist and Author, Captain of Artillery for Ordnance duty, C. S. A., 1861-5; M.A. University of Virginia, 1859; LL.D. St. John's College, Annapolis, Md., 1874; Acting Professor of English Literature, Woman's College of Baltimore, 1896-7; Principal of St. John's College, Annapolis, Md., 1870-80; Professor of English Language and Literature, University of Virginia, 1882-96; Warden of St. Anne's P. E. Church, Annapolis, Md. Studied at Berlin, Leipzig, 1869-70; V. P. Modern Language Association of America, 1887-8; Prest. Am. Dialect Soc., 1890-1; Prest. Am. Philol. Assn., 1893-4; Vice-Prest. Spelling Reform Assn. of America; author of “Translation of Beowulf,” 1882-1901; “Elene and Other Anglo-Saxon Poems,” 1889; editor of “Selections in English Prose,” 1891; “Hayne's Speech,” 1894; Macbeth, 1897; “Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America,” 1901; “History University of Virginia,” 1904.

He was a Captain and Ordnance Officer of Rodes's, later Grimes's Division, 2nd Corps, A.N.Va, C.S.A. He enlisted in the Rockbridge Artillery, Jul 17 1861 and was paroled at Appomattox, C.H., Va. AApr 10 1865.

(24) James Mercer Garnett (1872)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) James Mercer Garnett (1770) (22) Theodore Stanford Garnett (1812) (23) James Mercer Garnett (1840)

He was born at Middleburg, Virginia on 10 March 1872.

(21) John Mercer Garnett (1783)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736)

He was born on 24 March 1783 and died on 3 April 1856 at the age of 73. He did not marry.

(21) Muscoe Garnett (1786 - twin)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736)

The twin of William Henry Garnett Sr. Of “Prospect Hill,” Essex County, Virginia. He was born on 12 July 1786 and died in 1869 at the age of 82 [another source claims 10 April 1870 in Fredricksburg, Virginia]. He married Maria Willis Battaile in 1807. She was born in 1789, the grand daughter of Lieutenant Colonel Lewis Willis, of the 10th Virginia Continental Line, 1776, son of Colonel Henry Willis and his wife Mildred Washington, aunt and sponsor of General George Washington.

(22) William Garnett (1808)

(22) Alred Hay Garnett (1810)

(22) John Mercer Garnett (1812)

(22) Alexander Yelverton Peyton Garnett (1819)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) Muscoe Garnett (1786)

A physician, born in Essex County, Virginia on 20 September, 1820. He earned a degree in medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in 1841 and entered the United States Navy as an assistant surgeon on 8 September 1841. He was promoted to surgeon in 1848 and resigned on 21 October 1850 in order to accept the professorship of clinical medicine in the National medical College at Washington, D.C.

He married the eldest daughter of Henry A. Wise in 1848. In 1861 he left Washington and became a member of the examining board of surgeons for the Confederate army. He was afterward surgeon in charge of the two military hospitals in Richmond. He was the family physician of Jefferson Davis and of all his cabinet officers. He accompanied Mr. Davis after the evacuation of Richmond. Afterward he returned to Washington and was again elected a professor in the medical College in 1867, but resigned in 1870, and was made an emeritus professor. He was elected a vice-president of the American medical association in 1885.

He contributed to medical literature on the claims of "Condurango as a Cure for Cancer," "The Potomac Marshes and their Influence as a Pathogenic Agent," "Epidemic Jaundice among Children," "The Sorghum Vulgate or Broom-Corn Seed in Cystitis," "Nelaton's Probe in Gunshot Wounds," and "Coloproctitis treated by Hot-Water Douche and Dilatation or Division of the Sphincters."

(22) Edgar Malcom Garnett (1821)

(22) James Mercer Garnett (1823)

(22) Maria Champe Garnett (1825), she married Louis Anacharsis Garnett in 1853, she died in 1909

(22) Muscoe Garnett (1827)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) Muscoe Garnett (1786)

In the 1880 census as a single man, aged 52, a farmer, living at Port Royal, Caroline, Virginia with his cousin.

(23) Muscoe Garnett

I have a Private Muscoe Garnett Jr. who served in the 55th Virginia Infantry, along with a Lieutenant William Kemp Garnett [a cousin?], during the Civil War. He may be Moscoe Garnett IV, though enlisting as a Private wasn't the Garnett way.

(22) George Brooke Garnett (1831)

(22) Robert Payne Waring Garnett (1833)

He was born in 1833. He married Sally Brooke Harper on 18 October 1855. She was born about 1833. He died on 10 March 1850. There is a tax/revenue collector named R.P.W. Garnett mentioned in the Fredricksburg, Virginia New Era, a newspaper, in 1865. Perhaps a son of Robert's. The same list also has an A.Y. Garnett, who is also a tax collector. Could this refer to Dr. A.Y.P. Garnett, above? There is also a Robert P.W. Garnett who died in 1921.

(21) William Henry Garnett (1786 - twin)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736)

The twin of Muscoe Garnett Jr., he was born on 12 July 1786 in Mount Pleasant, Essex county and died on 16 March 1866 at the age of 79. He married Anna Maria Brooke in 1807. She was born on 15 May 1787 and died in 1854. She was the daughter of Richard Brooke.

(22) William Henry Garnett Jr. (1817 - twin)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) William Garnett (1786)

Richard Brooke Garnett's twin brother, he was born on 21 November 1817.

(22) General Richard Brooke Garnett, CSA (1817 - twin)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) Muscoe Garnett (1786)

He was born on 21 November 1817 at the family mansion in Essex county, Virginia. A West Point classmate and cousin of Brigadier General Robert Seldon Garnett. He graduated from the Academy in 1841, 29th in his class, and was appointed a Second lieutenant in the 6th U.S. infantry, and served in the Seminole war in Florida from 1841 to 1842. He served in garrison and on frontier duty in 1842 to 1845, and was aide-de-camp to his uncle, General George Mercer Brooke, at New Orleans, Louisiana, and San Antonio, Texas, from 1845 to 1851. He was promoted to First lieutenant on 16 February 1847. He was on frontier duty at Fort Laramie, Dakota, from 1852 to 1854 and on recruiting service, from 1854 to 1855. He was promoted Captain on 9 May 1855.

In 1855 he married 'Looking Woman,' an Oglala Lakota [Sioux], in the Fort Laramie region of California. An Indian woman, she was born in about 1840. She died on 12 December 1928 at the age of 88. He was engaged in quelling the disturbances in Kansas, a prelude to the Civil War, from 1856 to 1857 and in escorting the Kansas southern boundary commission in 1857. He was at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, from 1857 to 1858 and in the Utah expedition, otherwise known as the Mormon War, in 1858. He was in California from 1858 to 1861.

Garnett attended the "Hancock party" in Los Angeles where he together with General Winfield S. Hancock and Lewis A. Armistead struggled with the difficult choice of continuing to serve under the old flag or to resign and serve their confederate states. In the end, he resigned his commission, on 17 May 1861, and joined the Confederate army. He was commissioned a Major on 17 May 1861 and was initially engaged in garrison duty. He was not present at Manassas for the opening Confederate victory. On 14 November 1861, he was promoted to Brigadier General and was immediately assigned to the Shenandoah Valley, coming under command of General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, known as "Old Blue Light" for his intense, penetrating stare.

In the spring of 1862, Richard gained commanded Jackson's old unit, the "Stonewall Brigade." Like all future commanders of the brigade, he assumed responsibility under the shadow of its former leader and would be closely watched by Jackson to see how he was handling his “Old Brigade.” Jackson did not like Garnett from the beginning, thinking him unqualified and had actually asked that A.P. Hill command the brigade.

At the Battle of First Kernstown, Richard angered Jackson by ordering a retreat as his brigade began to break after running out of ammunition. He wrote:

“…had I not done so we would have run imminent risk of being routed by superior numbers, which would have resulted probably in the loss of part of our artillery and also endangered our transportation.”
Jackson had him relieved from command on 1 April and Garnett was arrested and sent under guard to Harrisonburg. The trial convened in August 1862 with only Jackson and his aide, Captain Alexander Pendleton, giving testimony. Active campaigning prevented completion of the court marital which is thought to have been going in Garnett's favor. The trial was suspended due to the pressing duties of renewed campaigning. General Robert E. Lee’s Maryland Campaign was underway and the services of a first-rate brigadier were sorely needed. By order of Lee, Garnett was released from arrest and assigned to Maj. Gen. James Longstreet First Corps.

Garnett's manuscript of the court marital is now at the Museum of the Confederacy and scribbled in its margins next to Jackson's remarks are often LIE and other comments. Garnett, however, to his credit, unlike Jackson, did not hold a grudge, serving as an honorary pallbearer in Jackson's funeral. For more information on Garnett and this issue, see Assorted Civil War FAQ.

Garnett campaigned zealously to get a new command and was given a brigade in George E. Pickett’s division on 5 September 1862. He led it at Antietam, Fredericksburg, and in southeastern Virginia. He cleared his tarnished reputation on the third day of the battle of Gettysburg. On 3 July 1863, too sick to walk and wearing a heavy overcoat in spite of the heat, he refused to watch from behind his men, electing instead to ride, on his personal mount Red Eye, in front and encouraging them. General Garnett got to within twenty yards of the Federal lines behind the stone wall on Cemetery Ridge, when he disappeared in the gunsmoke and confusion. His riderless horse soon galloped toward the rear. Presumably, Federal soldiers stripped his dead body of its sword and other insignia before burying Garnett in one of the mass graves on the battlefield. His sword turned up later in a Baltimore pawn shop.

Opposing him on the other side of that stone was was General John Gibbon, of the Heysham-Gibbon family. Richard was 45 years old. His body never recovered. There is a marker for General Garnett in the Confederate section of Hollywood Cemetery, in Richmond which reads:

"Among the Confederate Soldiers' Graves in this area is the probable resting place of Brigadier General Richard Brooke Garnett C.S.A. who was killed in action July 3, 1863, as he led his Brigade in the charge of Pickett's Division on the final day of the battle of Gettysburg. First buried on the battlefield, General Garnett's remains were likely removed to this area in 1872 along with other Confederate dead brought from Gettysburg by the Hollywood Memorial Association. Requiescat in Pace Richard Brooke Garnett 1817 - 1863."
Colonel Eppa Hunton, who was to succeed Garnett, said of him: “He was one of the noblest and bravest men I ever knew.”

(23) William Garnett (1855)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) Muscoe Garnett (1786) (22) Richard Brooke Garnett (1817)

He was born on 25 April 1855 at Fort Laramie, Wyoming Territory. He died on 12 October 1928 in Pine Ridge, Shannon, South Dakota at the age of 73. As half-Indian his life would have been fairly hard during this period of history. Dying at Pine Ridge implies he made his way amongst his mother's Indian relatives. He married three times.

(24) Charles W. Garnett (1876)

William had 'at least' 1 son. Charles was born in 1876 and died in 1954.

(21) Robert Seldon Garnett (1789)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736)

Or John Selden Garnett? The youngest brother of James Mercer Garnett, who was 19 years his senior. He was born on 26 April 1789 at Mount Pleasant, near Loretto, in Essex county, Virginia and died on 15 August 1840. A member of the United States Congress from 1817 to 1827. He married Charlotte Olympia Degouges [Charlotte Olympe Aubry de Gouges] on 30 December 1812. She was born on 5 May 1796, in Paris, the daughter of Pierre Aubry de Gouges and Marie-Anne Hyacinthe Mabille. How did the two come to meet?

"After the execution of Mme de Gouges on the guillotine the 3 november 1793 in Paris, general Pierre Aubry de Gouges went to Guyana with his children and wife. He died in Macouria in 1803 ans his wife Maria Hyacinthe Mabille married a second time with Mr Audibert. When Guyana was invaded by portuguese army in 1809, she fled to France with her children but ther vessel was captured by english navy. By the time the mother died on the boat and her corpse was thrown in the sea. The children went to the Antilles and settled in Guadeloupe. The two young Miss Aubry de Gouges, Charlotte and Geneviève, met then their husband and married about 1812/13. Geneviève married in Guadeloupe in 1813 then she went to England they went to Tasmania. But Charlotte could have be married either in Guadeloupe or in Virginia. I do not know. Sincerely yours, Charles-Olivier"
Charlotte died on 8 August 1856. She was the daughter of General Jean Pierre Degouges of the French Army.

He was educated at the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University, studied law, and began practice in Lloyds, Virginia. A Democratic member of Virginia state legislature in 1816 and 1817. Elected as a Republican to the Fifteenth Congress as a U.S. Representative and reeelcted to four succeeding Congresses. He served the 12th Distict from 1817 to 1827. On the question of recognizing the South American republics he voted alone. He was a political supporter and personal friend of Andrew Jackson.

He was not a candidate for renomination in 1826. He resumed the practice of law in Lloyds and died on his estate, “Champlain,” near Lloyds, Essex County, Virginia on 15 August 1840, and was interned in the family burying ground on his estate.

Their children were,
(22) Robert Selden Garnett (1819)
(22) Louis Anacharsis Garnett (1821)

(22) Brigadier General Robert Selden Garnett, CSA (1819)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) Robert Selden Garnett (1789)

He was born on 16 December 1819 at "Champlain" in Essex county, Viriginia. He and his cousin, Richard Brooke Garnett, were inseparable friends as children. He was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1841, standing 27th in his class of 52. Richard Brooke was in the same class.

He was appointed a Second lieutenant of artillery and, from July 1843, to October 1844, he was assistant instructor of infantry tactics at the Military Academy. He was aide-de-camp to General Wool in 1845 and distinguished himself in the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Pahna. He was promoted to First lieutenant in 1846 and was aide-de-camp to General Taylor through the Mexican war. He was brevetted Captain and Major for gallant and meritorious conduct at Monterey and Buena Vista.

He was transferred to the infantry in 1848. In 1849 he was in California and designed the state seal, left. He was promoted to Captain in 1851. From 1852 till 1854 he was commandant of the corps of cadets and instructor in infantry tactics at West Point. He was commissioned as Major on 27 March 1855. He was the commander in the operations against the Indians on Puget's sound, Washington territory in 1856, and commanded the Yakima expedition in 1858.

At the beginning of the Civil War he returned from Europe, where he had been traveling on sick leave, and resigned his commission on 30 April 1861. He was appointed Adjutant General, with the rank of Colonel and assigned to organize the Virginia troops. On 6 June 1861, he was commissioned as Brigadier General in the Confederate army and sent to command the forces in the western part of the state.

On 3 June 1861 about 1,000 Confederate troops, commanded by Colonel George Porterfield, were defeated by about 1,900 Union troops commanded by Colonel Benjamin F. Kelley at the Battle of Philippi. That battle is considered by many the first land battle of the Civil War. Porterfield retreated to Huttonsville where he was met and relieved of his command by General Robert Selden Garnett. General Garnett then merged his 5,000 Confederate troops with the 1,000 led by Porterfield, creating an army of about 6,000 troops. General Garnett then established several defensive positions throughout the Beverly-Huttonsville area. He was especially interested in defending a strategic mountain pass on the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike. On 22 June 1861 20,000 Union troops, commanded by General George Brinton McClellan crossed the Ohio River by Parkersburg and used the B & O Railroad to reach Grafton the next day. They then marched to meet General Garnett's forces. The two forces then maneuvered for position for several weeks before finally meeting in battle on 11 July 1861 at Rich Mountain, just a few miles west of Beverly. The vastly outnumbered Confederate forces were defeated and forced to withdraw from the area. The victory was instrumental in General McClellan's later being promoted to commander of the Army of the Potomac.

While withdrawing from his Laurel Hill entrenchment following the battle of Rich Mountain, General Garnett received false information that his escape route into Virginia along the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike was blocked. Instead he turned northeast along the ridges and valleys that were more difficult to travel. He had withdrawn under cover of dark on 11 July 1861, but the federal column had easily followed and caught up with Garnett's rear guard on 13 July. For several days the Federals gave chase and skirmished at every stream crossing. Crossing at Corrick's Ford, Confederate troops on a high bluff gave cover for their troops to cross the river. While directing this rearguard action, General Garnett was shot and killed. His body was recovered by Union troops, but was returned to the family by General McClellan. Garnett had the unfortunate distinction of being the first Confederte general officer killed in the Civil War.

(22) Louis Anacharsis Garnett (1821)
(14) Anthony Garnett (c1525) (15) Robert Garnett (c1555) (16) Thomas Garnett (1585) (17) John Garnett (c1625) (18) John Garnett (c1648) (19) Thomas Garnett (1675/6) (20) Muscoe Garnett (1736) (21) Robert Selden Garnett (1789)

He was born in 1821 in Essex county, Virginia and died in 1901 in Pacific Grove, California. A graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, but he had no military record. From the "Superintendent's Order Book," Vol. 1, Nov 1839-Jan 1852 Jan, page 1, Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, 11 November 1839, Order No 1:

"Major Francis H. Smith assumes the command of the Virginia Military Institute. All reports, permits, & c will be made to him during the morning Office Hours. The present guard will consist of one Sergeant, one Corporal, and three privates--and one sentinel will be habitually posted at the main gate. The following temporary appointments are made--
Cadet Wm. D. Fair. to be Adjutant of the Corps of Cadets
Cadet Henry B. Sumpter to be 1st Sergeant
Cadet James H. Jameson to be 2nd Sergeant
Cadet Louis A. Garnett to be 3d Sergeant

He became a lawyer. He married Maria Champe Garnett, a cousin, in 1853. She was the daughter of Muscoe Garnett, Robert Selden's brother, and Maria Battaile.

In 1856 he was employed at the U.S. Branch Mint, in San Francisco, California. From "Trade Dollars, 1873-1885, Historical Background," by R.W. Julian:

"One of the people in San Francisco with whom Knox [John Jay Knox, a numismatist, deputy comptroller of the currency, assigned as a special investigator of problems at the San Francisco Mint] held long discussions was Louis A. Garnett. The latter explained to Knox about the coming silver problem and suggested that a "commercial dollar," as it was first called, was the answer. Garnett believed that if a sufficient number of them could be exported to China and India, the expected troubles would not materialize. It was well known, for example, that hoarding was endemic to India, and if Indians could be induced to hoard American silver, so much the better.

Louis Anicharsis Garnett, who "was more responsible for the idea of the United States trade dollar than any other man," was a son of Robert S., a congressman from Virginia. Graduating from the Military Institute of Lexington in 1842, he later studied and practiced law through 1850, when President Zachary Taylor appointed him to a post at the San Francisco Custom House. In the early 1850s Louis A. Garnett was among those who helped establish the San Francisco Mint (opened in 1854). At one time he served as treasurer, later melter and refiner, there.

In 1860 he was an incorporator of the Ophir Mine. In the early 1860s Garnett went to Europe, where he studied finance, banking, and economics. In 1870 he was named to the positions of president, manager, and board member of the San Francisco Assaying and Refining Works, which at the time was depositing about two-thirds of the gold received for coining at the San Francisco Mint. In 1876 he retired from active business management to devote his time to studying financial and currency matters. In 1898 he represented California at the Monetary Commission conference held in Indianapolis. He died three years later, at the age of 79.

In 1870 in his meetings with Knox, Garnett emphasized that the proposed commercial dollar should have no real relationship to the regular currency and the name dollar would be for legal purposes only. In effect the American government would be exporting round ingots of silver which were in the form of coins rather than the traditional shapes."
This idea appears similar to today's marketing of gold Krugerands and Canadian Maple Leaf dollars.

He was an author, included in "Allibone's Critical Dictionary of English Literature: A Supplement, British and American authors," Two volumes, by John Foster Kirk, Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott & Co., 1891. He is also in "A Dictionary of North American Authors Deceased before 1950," compiled by W. Stewart Wallace, Toronto, Ryerson Press, 1951.

Anacharsis

I had assumed that Louis's father was showing off his erudition when he named his son. Anacharsis was a Scythian philosopher who lived about 600 B.C. Born on the northern shore of the Black Sea, then known as the Euxine, he prevailed on his father, the local King, to send him to Athens as ambassador in 589 B.C. There he became acquainted with Solon, the father of Athenian law, from whom he rapidly acquired a knowledge of the wisdom and learning of Greece, and by whose influence he was introduced to the principal persons in Athens. He was the first stranger who received the privileges of citizenship. He was reckoned one of the Seven Sages, and it is said that he was initiated into the Eleusinian mysteries. He was known as an extremely smooth and effective orator.

However, I was recently informed by Charles-Olivier Blanc that "Louis-Anacharsis comes from a brother of Mrs Garnett bornt Charlotte Olympe Aubry de Gouges, probably the father in law of Louis Anacharsis Garnett." So the erudition was exhibited by an earlier member of the family.


Their children were,
(23) Louis de Gouges Garnett (1858), born 10 February 1858, died after 1900
(23) Yelverton Triplett Garnett (1860), born 8 December 1860, he married Ne Miland. Their children were,
- (24) Yelverton Triplett Garnett (1916)
- (24) James Garnett (1917)
(23) Kennedy Porter Garnett (1871), born 12 March 1871, Married Edna Foote 1890, died 1930 in Pittsburgh,


The Westmoreland county Garnett's appear to be a different family, or a branch that split off early.

Henry Thomas Garnett (c1800)

Of Oak Grove, Westmoreland county, Virginia. Democrat. Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Virginia. Married Eliza Stuart Bankhead.

Colonel Thomas Stuart Garnett, CSA (1825)

He was born in 19 April 1825 in Westmoreland county, Viriginia. He attended VMI, but did not graduate. He was a Physician [or was he a lawyer?]. He fought in the Mexican-American War as a Lieutenant. He married Emma L. Baber in 1848. He enlisted as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Confederate Army on 27 June 1861, in Company S, 48th Virginia Infantry Regiment. He was hospitalized on 01 March 1862 at Richmond, virginia and then Wounded in the left thigh on 09 August 1862 at Cedar Run. He was promoted to Full Colonel on 02 April 1863. He was killed while still serving in Company S, 48th Virginia Infantry Regiment, on 03 May 1863 at Chancellorsville.

Errata:

From Colonial Families of the United States of America: Volume 5, p.594, Passengers on “The Ark” and “The Dove” Inv. Apl. 29, 1638–Richard Garnett Sur. Admr.

United Empire Loyalists

Proceeding of Loyalist Commissioners. Montreal, 1788. VOL. XIII, page 415

“He is a native of England & came to America in the 28th Real. in 1758. He got his discharge at the Peace & settled in Pennsylvania. D, 1764 he came to Albany County where he lived in 1775. He came to Canada in 1777. Before that time he had lived in the woods with Lt. Garnet & never on any occasion joined the rebels. After he came to Canada he served the remainder of the War in the R. Real. of N. York.”

Colonial Families of the United States of America: Volume 7

The earliest information which we have, as yet been able to obtain of this particular family is that Robert BARRET “a dauntless sailor in the English Navy” is mentioned as being a Master of one of the ships of the fleet which Admiral Sir John HAWKINS commanded, and which sailed from Plymouth on the 2d October, 1567. This particular fleet consisted of six ships, namely, The Jesus, Admiral HAWKIN'S flagship, Robert BARRET, Master; The Mignon, Capt. Thomas HAMPTON, John GARNETT, Master; The William and John, Capt. Thomas BOLTON, James POUNCE; Master; The Judith, Capt. (afterwards Sir) Francis DRAKE; The Angel and The Swallow; he was evidently in the “West India Trade” and must have amassed more or less a fortune; m. Penelope GILBERT.

From Colonial families of the United States of America: Volume 7

Interestingly, this Garnett does not use the family arms.
I. William Garnett, b. 19th November, 1890, the subject of this memoir.
Arms.—Gules a boar's head erased argent.
Crest.—A dexter hand holding a dagger erect ppr. on the point a boar's head couped gules.
Mottoes.—“Vi aut virtute;” over crest “Feros ferio.”
Residence.—925 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Maryland. Clubs.—Bachelor's Cotillon. Societies.—Colonial Wars, Sons of the Revolution, American Historical Association, American Red Cross, General Alumni Association, University of Maryland.

The Gernet name can still be found in France, where there are two famous historians, Louis and Jacques Gernet, in Germany and America. However, I believe the name developed independently of the Gernet family in England.

Steve Hissem
San Diego, California