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The Bowes Family

The Bowes family were originally from Northern England, in Northumbria and what later became Yorkshire. Very early it contained learned men who were either lawyers or, later, merchants. The main branches became quite wealthy in the coal business. The lines I've tracked so far are the aristocratic Bowes families of Bradley Hall, Streatlam Castle, Elford, Great Bromley, and Thornton Hall. There are also lesser families of Angram Grange and Brompton Grange. See Bowes Family of Brompton, Northallerton for an exhaustive study of the many branches of this ancient family. From that page - "There are other Bowes families mentioned by Robert Surtees in his "History and Antiquities of the County Palatine of Durham" (1816-1840) in which he states: "that there were various sprinklings of the ancient name of Bowes, hesitating between gentry and yeomanry, that occur in wills and registers throughout Allertonshire and Richmondshire. The families established at Ellerbeck and at Angram Grange, held considerable landed property for several descents.""

Oddly, despite the fame of the family, there are significant strays. I have a Francis Bowes who, in 1632, had been Sheriff [of Yorkshire?] and was knighted. He was a member of Parliament in 1644-1645, yet I don't know how he relates to the family, any more than I do how Sir Francis Bowes of America does. The family continued to live in the north of England after our Francis emigrated. There is a Bowes Museum and Bowes Castle in Durham. The Queen Mother, now deceased, was a Bowes-Lyon.

The Village of Bowes

The village of Bowes is a very ancient place, built on the site of the Roman station, Lavatrae, on the old Roman military highway, the Cades road. The road runs through the Stainmore pass which led to Cataractonium on the other side of the Pennine mountains. A number of smaller forts and signal stations dot the road. The Bowes fort covered 4 acres, arranged in the standard Roman square. Built during the Flavian period, it was occupied from the 2nd to 4th centuries. It was garrisoned by Cohors IV Breucorum in the 2nd century, Cohors I Thracum Equitata in the third, and Numerus Exploratum near the end of the fourth century.

Bowes is also the name of the parish and is in the wapentake of Gilling West and liberty of Richmondshire. It is 4 miles southwest of Barnard Castle, in the North Riding near the north point of the county of Yorkshire. The river Greta flows through the valley, just south of the village.

On a more slanderous note, "Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868" notes that Bowes is located "in a bleak country, on the verge of Stainmoor Forest, and on the banks of the river Greta." It is located on the main pass across the northern Pennines mountains, linking northern Yorkshire and Cumbria. Much of the area is moorland.

An interesting note, two miles from the village is "God's-bridge," a natural bridge over the Greta river consisting of a rock of limestone through which the river has worn its way. It is about 15 feet in span and broad enough to serve for a good carriage way. Just past this natural bridge the river plunges underground for about half a mile before breaking into the open again.

The village website is at Bowes.org.


(-6) William de Arcubus (c1030)

William is the traditional forebear of the family, but probably a mythological one. "There is a tradition recorded in a MS. which belonged to the monastery of St. Mary, York, and related in the Bowes pedigree, that Alan Niger, Earl of Richmond, in defence of the honor against the men of Cumberland and Westmoreland, who rebelled against the Conqueror, and with Gospatric, Earl of Northumberland, adhered to the King of Scots, built for himself the tower of Bowes, and placed therein his cousin William with 500 archers, and gave him a shield with the arms of Brittany, and three bows over them; and a bundle of arrows for his crest, whence this William was afterwards called William de Arcubus. This done into English is Bowes (bows) which became the surname of his descendants. Unfortunately for the truth of the tradition, there is a glaring anachronism. Crests and coats of arms did not come into use in England till long after the time of Earl Alan." - from "Geographical and Historical information from the year 1890." William was the great-great-grandfather of Adam Bowes according to Burke's "Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland."

Bowes Castle

The castle was constructed on the foundations of the Roman Lavatrae Fort. It is situated on the brink of a hill overlooking the Greta river valley and commands the approach to Stainmore over the Pennines, on the road from York to Carlisle.

Only the 50-foot high square keep remains of the original castle, surrounded on two sides by the remains of an original inner moat. It appears that the central keep was never defended by a curtain wall.

The castle is thought to have been built originally by Alan, Earl of Richmond, soon after the Norman conquest of 1066 on the site of the old Roman fort, in 1087. It was besieged in 1173 by King William of Scotland. It was substantially rebuilt in the period from 1171 to 1187. Around 1216 enemies of King John again besieged the castle, and again in 1322 in a regional feud between Henry Fitzhugh and the Earl of Richmond.

One site gives the following descent from William de Arcubus, assuming Adam Bowes, below, as generation (1):
(-5) John Bowes
(-4) John Bowes
(-3) Henry Bowes
(-2) Stephen Bowes
(-1) Stephen Bowes

An alternative descent was derived from the previously mentioned "Geographical and Historical information from the year 1890." Note that until I figure out how Sir Francis Bowes of Trenton, New Jersey fits into the descent, the generation numbers are based on Adam Bowes, below, as generation (1). Note that this descent at least agrees with (-1) Stephen Bowes.

(-4) Fulco de Bowes (c1100)

The father of Osbert.

(-3) Osbert de Bowes (c1150)

"Osbert, son of Fulco de Bowes, was one of the King's commissioners for superintending the erection of the [Bowes] castle [1171-1187], and this appears to have been the only connection the family had with the fortress. They were, however, possessed of lands in [the village of] Bowes at an early period, but it is from this Fulco de Bowes, rather than the traditional William de Arcubus, that their pedigree is to be traced." - from "Geographical and Historical information from the year 1890."

(-2) Unknown de Bowes (c1200)

(-1) Stephen de Bowes (c1250)

Adam, was his fourth son.

(1) Sir Adam Bowes of Streatlam (c1280)

Of Richmond. Either the descendant of the William de Arcubus or fourth in descent from Fulco de Bowes. Sir Adam Bowes, knight, was a man "learned in the lawes." A lawyer and Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas in the fifth of Edward III, 1331/2, and also Bailiff of Richmond from 1332 to 1334. Seneschal to the Bishop of Durham. He married Alice Trayne in about 1310. She was the daughter and sole heir of John Trayne [Trayner], knight lord of Steatlam, and Agnes de la Hay, heiress of Ralph de La Hay, Lord Percy, of Stainton le Strata. Adam obtained Streatlam Castle through this marriage. This was the main family seat until the 19th century and was 3 miles north east of Barnard Castle. Adam became the Lord of Streatlam in right of his wife. He probably died in 1356.

Streatlam Castle

Streatlam Castle, "Newcastle" in some records, existed in the late 13th century. It was named for its location on a Roman street. It was rebuilt in the 15th century and again rebuilt, on the old foundations, between 1718 and the mid-19th century. It is now a complete ruin. Some walls, particularly at west end, have a very thick core of rubble masonry but there are no other traces of antiquity. Streatlam was the seat of the Bowes family, and later the Bowes-Lyon, Earls of Strathmore, and fronted an older building rebuilt by Sir William Bowes around 1450. The building was gutted in 1927 and demolished in 1959 as part of a Territorial Army exercise.


(2) Thomas Bowes (c1315)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280)

Who d.s.p.

(2) William Bowes (c1315)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280)

(2) Robert Bowes (c1310)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280)

The successor of Sir Adam Bowes as knight lord of Streatlam. He was born in about 1310. He married first Unknown and had a son, Robert. Second he married Elizabeth de Lilburne [Leyburne], the daughter of Sir John Lilburne, of Lilburne, in Northumberland. They had 4 children, Thomas, William, Margaret, and Alice.

A Robert and a William de Bowes were mentioned in the rolls of Edward III as having a coat of arms, ermine, three long bows "tenduz" gules. No arms, however, have ever been registered with the College of Arms in London. The Bowes-Lyon family of the Queen mother uses arms quartering with the Bowes arms viz, ermine three bows, strings palewise, proper. These are what is known as "punning" arms, i.e. bows for Bowes.

(3) Robert Bowes (c1330)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310)

The eldest son of Robert. In the 29th year of the reign of Edward III [1359] the elder Robert entailed all his estates upon his issue male [that is, Robert Jr.], but [he] dying without issue, his possessions descended to his brother, William.

(3) Sir William Bowes (c1330)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310)

His brother's successor. He was created a Knight Banneret for his gallantry at the battle of Poitiers in 1346 [so says Burke's Commoners, but the battle actually took place in 1356]. Note that William would have been the squire of some older knight at the beginning of the battle.

The Battle of Poitiers

A battle of the Hundred Years War (1337-1453). In August 1356 Edward, the Black Prince, eldest son of Edward III, commenced a great raid out of Acquitaine, in what is now known as Bordeaux. This expedition was designed to relieve French pressure on the English garrisons in Normandy, commanded by his brother, John of Gaunt. John II, the King of France, determined to ambush the English. Edward retreated south, but was caught near Poitiers. Outnumbered, he offered to surrender his spoils and his prisoners and not fight for 7 years if he were allowed to escape, but the French were so confident of victory that they refused his offer.

Edward, a veteran of the battle of Crecy, organized his men in a defensive position on an eminence behind a maze of hedges. John, remembering the massacre of mounted knights at Crecy, ordered his men to fight on foot. However, forced to approach through narrow gaps in the hedges, their concentrated mass created a perfect target for the English longbowmen. At a pivotal moment in the battle Edward released a small cavalry force that had been hiding in a nearby wood. Threatened by encirclement, the French broke and their King, left exposed on the field, was captured. His ransom would bankrupt the nation.


The Steps of Knighthood

Page

When the son of a Knight turned 6 or 7 years old he would be sent to a nearby castle where he would be trained by the Lord of that castle. During the first stage of his training, as a Page, he would help his lord to dress and put on his armor. He also maintained the armor by rolling it in a barrel of sand to remove the rust. He would engage in physical exercise, like wrestling, and practice with a wooden sword. The Lord's lady might teach the boy table manners. He would also learn to hunt and hawk.

Squire

At about the age of 14 he became a Squire, the Knight's personal servant. In battle, a Squire would bring his Knight replacements of lances, swords, horses, or any item lost or damaged in the battle. He would now train with real weapons and was allowed to carry a sword and a shield to show his rank.

Knight

A Squire became a Knight by the act of dubbing, that is being slapped with the flat of a sword while his Lord intoned, "I dub thee Sir Knight." On normal occasions this would be preceded by a night of prayer and much ceremony. On the battlefield it would be a more perfunctory act.

William married Maude De Dalden, the sole heir of Jordan Dawden [Robert de Dalden], and with her acquired Dawden, Seaham, Ryhope, Seaton, and other properties. Their children were, Robert, Thomas, Roger, William, Adam, Ralph, John, Elizabeth, and Idones.

(4) Sir Robert Bowes (c1360)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330)

He succeeded his father, Sir William Bowes. He married Jane [Joan] Conyers, the daughter of Sir Robert Conyers [Coigniers], of Sockburn and Ormesby, in Cleveland, and Alianna de Cotam. He was created a Knight Banneret at the seige of Rouen, Normandy in 1419. He was subsequently slain with Thomas, Duke of Clarence, at the disaster at Bangey [Baugy] Bridge in 1421 [?].

(5) Sir William Bowes (1389)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360)

"Old Sir William." He succeeded his father, Sir Robert Bowes. The "sole surviving heir of the whole family." - from "Geographical and Historical information from the year 1890" by George Bulmer. I assume that means that all of his brothers died sine prole. He was born in 1389 in Durham. He married Joan [Jane], the daughter of Ralph Lord Greystock, in about 1415 and acquired the manor of Newton, in Durham. She was the daughter of Ralph Lord Greystoke and Elizabeth FitzHugh. She died within the year, however, leaving him an infant son. Sir William mourned her loss by living a widower for the rest of his life.

He was knighted at the battle of Vernoile [Verneuil] in 1424.

The Battle of Verneuil

This was a battle of the second half of the Hundred Years War and followed the death of Henry V in 1422. The Regent of France for the infant Henry VI was his uncle John, the Duke of Bedford. John had assembled an army to conquer the counties of Maine and Anjou, which would link English possessions in Normandy and Acquitaine. In the meantime the French raised an army to attack Normandy and succeeded in capturing the town of Verneuil by a ruse. John raced to the walled city with 9,000 men. A French and Scots army of 17,000 emerged and attacked in front of the city wall with great confidence. The French cavalry could have done great damage, but after sweeping John's right flank, they chose instead to continue and attack the English baggage train. A reserve force of archers drove them off with great loss. After heavy fighting, the French center was driven back and many drowned in the city's moat. When the French center broke John turned on the Scots who had been exposed by the French retreat. Other English forces from across the field then joined the attack, eventually surrounding the Scots, who were massacred.

William was Chamberlain to John Duke of Bedford, the younger brother of Henry V, while he was Regent of France. He was also Governor of Galliard Castle, in Normandy. He served in France for 20 years. Back in England, he was Warden of the Middle March and Governor of Berwick castle. He also rebuilt Streatlam Castle, having made plans for its restoration while still in France. William resided at Streatlam so long that he became known as "old Sir William Bowes." He died in 1465 at Streatlam at the age of 86.

(6) Sir William Bowes II (1446)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389)

He succeeded his father, Sir William Bowes. He was born in about 1446 at Steatlam Castle. He was High Sheriff of Northumberland and Warden of the Middle March against Scotland. He married Maude FitzHugh, the daughter of William [Henry?] Lord FitzHugh, Baron of Ravensworth, and Margaret Willoughby. Their children were William, Ralph, Robert [a lawyer, Master of the Rolls, Privy Counselor to Henry VII, s.p], Thomas [s.p.], Henry, John [?, Knight, Speaker of the House of Commons 1436, s.p.], Margery (she married William Hilton, of Hilton), Elizabeth (she married Sir R. Bulmer, of Witton), Catherine (she married Sir Richard Conyers), Margaret (she married Sir Humphrye L'Isle), Isabel (she married Sir John Swinowes), and Anne (she married Ralph Wycliffe).

(7) Sir William Bowes (c1465)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446)

He succeeded his father, William Bowes. Knight. He married Isabel Clifton, the niece of Lawrence Booth, the bishop of Durham, but died without issue on 7 October 1474. The family estates devolved upon his brother, Ralph.

(7) Sir Ralph Bowes (1468)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446)

He was born on 1 September 1468 at Streatlam Castle, Durham, England. He succeeded his brother, William Bowes.

He married Margery Conyers, the daughter and co-heir of Sir Richard Conyers, of South Cowton, and Alice Wycliffe, in about 1475 [?]. She was born in South Cowton. Note that Margery Conyers' brother, Richard, married Ralph's sister, Catherine. Ralph's children were Ralph, Robert (successor to his nephew), Richard, John, and Margery. He died before 3 July 1482 in Steatlam.

(8) Sir Ralph Bowes II (c1500)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468)

He succeeded his father, Sir Ralph Bowes. He was born in South Cowton. Of Streatlam and Dalden. The High Sheriff of Durham for 30 years. He fought at the battle of Flodden Field in 1509 and was there knighted. He married Elizabeth Clifford, the sister of Henry Clifford, the first Earl of Cumberland. Their children were George, his only son, Margery [Muriel] (she married Ralph Eure), and Anne. Ralph died in April 1516.

(9) Sir George Bowes (1517)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Ralph Bowes II (c1500)

He succeeded his father, Sir Ralph Bowes. Of Dawden. He was born in 1517 [?]. He died in 1546. He married Muriel Eure, the grand-daughter of Lord William Eure, of Witton, in 1534. Her brother married Margery Bowes. Sir George Bowes took part in border warfare. He went with the Earl of Hereford on his devastating raid in 1544 and was knighted in May of that year at Leith. So highly were his services esteemed that the King announced his plans to confer a barony upon him, though this never happened. He returned from Scotland and died in 1556 [or 1546] with no surviving male heir. Their children were Ralph (who apparently died young), Elizabeth (she was the 2nd wife of John Blakiston), Anne (she married Robert Bowes, the son of Richard Bowes and Elizabeth Aske] and Dorothy (she married Sir Cuthbert Collingwood, of Eslinton). Sir George was succeeded by his uncle, Sir Robert Bowes, Knight, below.

(8) Henry Bowes
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468)

He married Tabba Sadler.

(8) Sir Robert Bowes (1495)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468)

He succeeded his nephew, Sir George Bowes. He was born in 1495. A distinguished courtier during the reigns of Henry VIII and Edward VI. He was Warden of the Middle March [also referred to as Warden of West March and East March]. He took part in the Pilgrimage of Grace in 1536. Robert Aske, the son of Sir Robert Aske of Aughton near Selby, was their leader. Robert Bowes was allowed to travel to Windsor to put their case before Henry VIII, though unsucsessfully. The following is from a dissertation, "Sollom MOss - 1542" by James R. Bell.

"By August 1542, both English and Scottish Borderers were being incited by their respective Governments to wreak as much havoc as possible on the opposite side as a forerunner to the now inevitable war. In reprisal for a particularly effective Scottish Reivers raid, Robert Bowes, the English East March Warden raided and devastated Teviotdale and the surrounding area; whilst returning with the plunder and livestock, the English were ambushed by the Earl of Huntly at Haddon Rig. The English force included Reivers from Tynedale and Redesdale, who realising the overwhelming odds, deserted Bowes and vanished into the hills with the plunder. The remaining English were badly defeated and fled, with Robert Bowes being taken prisoner. Henry VIII was furious and decided to settle the matter once and for all by force."
A Privy Councillor from 1551 to 1554. He was Master of the Rolls of the Court of Chancery from 1552 to 1553, that is, he was the third most senior judge in England. He was a witness to the will of Edward VI which devised the crown to Lady Jane Grey. His signature is on a letter from the Privy Council to Princess Mary, dated 9 July 1553, stating that she was illegitimate and that Lady Jane Grey was Edward VI's true heir.

Robert Bowes married Dorothy Metcalfe [or Alice Medcalfe?], the daughter of Sir James Metcalfe. They had 4 sons but they all died young. He died in 1554 - conveniently or at the hands of Mary? The family estates devolved upon his brother, Richard.

(8) Richard Bowes (1498)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468)

He succeeded his brother, Sir Robert Bowes. He was born in about 1498 in Seaham Manor, Durham, England. He married Elizabeth Aske, the daughter and co-heir of Sir Roger Aske, of Aske, and Margaret Wycliffe. She was born in 1505 in Aske, Richmond, Yorkshire, England. He was the Captain of Norham in 1550. Richard died on 10 November 1558 in Durham. Elizabeth died on 10 April 1558 in Durham. Their children were George, Robert, Ralph, Francis, Christopher, Bridget, Elizabeth, Anne, Muriel, Margery, Margaret, Mary, Lucy, Jane, and Agnes.

Aske

Aske is a township of 1,764 acres. It was written Asse in the Domesday Book and had, previous to Norman usurpation, belonged to Tor, a Saxon. Soon after the Conquest, the manor was granted to Whyomar, a kinsman and sewer to Alan, the first Earl of Richmond. Whyomar's descendants, under the name of Aske, flourished for upwards of 500 years. The direct line, terminating in Elizabeth, one of the daughters and co-heiresses of Roger Aske, conveyed this estate in marriage, about 1530, to Richard Bowes, one of the Streatlam family, in the County of Durham. The manor remained in this family until the time of Sir Talbot Bowes, who sold it to Philip, Lord Wharton.


(9) Sir Robert Bowes (c1535)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498)

Of Aske. The younger brother of Sir George Bowes. He matriculated from Queen's College, Cambridge on Michelmas 1547. He married Eleanor Musgrave, the daughter of Sir Richard Musgrave, of Hartley, and Anne Wharton. Another source claims that he married his cousin, Ann Bowes, the daughter of (9) Sir George Bowes, above. Member of Parliament for Knaresborough in 1563, for Carlisle in 1571, for Appleby in 1572, and for the county of Cumberland in 1584 and 1588. Sheriff of Durham in 1569 (another Rober Bowes, also of Queens College, 1545, was his Deputy Sheriff).

A supporter of Elizabeth 1 at the time of The Rising of the North in 1569, he was the sworn enemy of the Percy's, Neville's, and Dacre's. He, and his brother Sir George Bowes, occuppied and defended Barnard Castle against the Earls during the Rising, though their home at Streatlam was destroyed. The family was rewarded with the title of "Master and Keeper of the forests and chases within the Lordship of Barnard Castle." Sir Robert Bowes of Aske, esquire, was Elizabeth I's Ambassador to Scotland from 1577 to 1583. It appears that his brother, George, also served as an ambassador to Scotland. He died at Berwick on 15 November 1597. Eleanor died d.s.p. on 25 July 1623.

(9) Marjorie Bowes
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498)

Or Margery. She married John Knox, the Scottish reformer. Her father opposed the match, both because he felt it beneath his family's position and because he was inclined to "popery." Knox attempted to have Margery's uncle, Sir Robert Bowes, intervene, but he also opposed the match.

(9) Sir George Bowes (1529)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498)

He succeeded his father, Richard Bowes, as heir-general of the family, and to him descended the Dawdon estates, with other possessions in the eastern part of the county of Durham. He was born in about 1529 [1527?], of Steatlam, Durham. Sheriff of Yorkshire. He was knighted in 1558 and appointed Governor of Barnard Castle. In 1568 he escorted Mary Queen of Scots from Carlisle to Bolton Castle. Later Mary had a grateful remembrance of his kindness and wrote to him as a friend. He was made Knight Marshall North of the Trent by special commission, for his signal services to Queen Elizabeth, "an office which gave him an opportunity of wreaking his vengeance on the enemies of the queen and himself, and which he is said to have exercised with great severity."

Marshal Knight of Berwick and a supporter of Elizabeth 1 at the time of The Rising of the North in 1569. When the Earls of Westmoreland and Northumberland reared the Standard of revolt in the North, Sir George was the only person of great influence that opposed the insurgents, having, for that purpose, fortified himself in Barnard Castle. He, and his brother, Robert, occuppied and defended Barnard Castle against the Earls during the Rising, though his home at Streatlam was destroyed. The family was rewarded with the title of "Master and Keeper of the forests and chases within the Lordship of Barnard Castle." He was in many commissions for treaties with Scotland, and had other marks of confidence and trust.

It was in 1569 that the Bowes family was granted Bradley Hall.

He first married Dorothy Mallory, the daughter of Sir William Mallory, of Studley, near Ripon, in Yorkshire. Their children were William, Robert, George, Elizabeth (she married Sir Charles Wandesford, of Kirtlington), and Anne (she married Sir John Conyers).

Second he married Jane [Joan] Talbot, the daughter of Sir John Talbot, of Albrighton, in Salop, and Frances Giffard. "By a strange will or entail made by Sir George about the year 1590 , the estate of Streatlam , with the great bulk of his property, passed to Sir Talbot Bowes , his son by the second marriage; and thus his eldest son, by his former wife, was deprived of his birthright, and only inherited from his father the estate and lordship of Bradley Hall which had been acquired by a grant from the crown 14th of Elizabeth. The younger branch, having in this manner become possessed of the immense estates of Sir George , continued for a long time to be one of the most considerable families of the county palatine . . ." - from Burke's "Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland." It is through this line that the Bowes-Lyons family of the late Queen Mother emerges.

The children of Jane Talbot were Francis, Talbot, Richard, Thomas, John, Anne, Elizabeth, and Jane. Sir George Bowes died in 1580.


The Bowes of Bradley Hall

The following are the children of Sir George Bowes and his first wife, Dorothy Mallory.

Arms: 1st for Bowes .-Ermine, three bows strung in pale gu. 2nd for Trayne .-Arg. a cross flory, between four martlets az. 3rd for De la Hay .-Arg. a fess between six martlets gu. 4th for Dawden .-Arg. three fesses az. a border eng. gu. 5th for Conyers of Boulby .-Az. a maunch or, debruised by a bendlet checky ermine and or. 6th for Fitz Hugh .-Az. a chief and three chevronells conjoined in base or. 7th for Grey .-Gu. a lion rampant within a border eng. arg. 8th for Conyers of South Cowton .-Az. a maunch or. 9th for Aske .-Az. four fesses or. 10th.-As first.

Crest-A sheaf of arrows or, bound in a girdle az. surmounted with the motto-Sans variance et mon droit.

Motto-In multis-in magnis-in bonis expertus.

Estate-Bradley Hall, in the parish of Wolsingham, in the county of Durham, acquired, by grant from the crown, as part of the forfeited possession of the Earl of Westmoreland, temp. Elizabeth. Seat-Bradley Hall, Durham.


Bradley Hall


(10) Sir William Bowes (c1550)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529)

The son of Sir George's first marriage to Dorothy Mallory, he succeeded his father, but only to the Bradley Hall and its estates. He was born in Durham. He matriculated from St. John's College, Cambridge on Lent 1564-5. M.A. 1594-5 on accompanying the Earl of Essex to Cambridge. He served under his father in Scotland and in the Northern rebellion. Knighted in 1586. Member of Parliament for Westmorland in 1593. He was frequently employed in embassies to Scotland and was Treasurer of Berwick-upon-Tweed in the reign of James I. He married Mary Scrope, the daughter of Henry, the ninth Lord Scrope, of Bolton, and upon the decease of her uncle, Emanuel, the Earl of Sunderland, was heir to that Barony. By this lady he had an only daughter, Mary, who married Sir William Eure. He died at Walton, Derbyshire on 30 October 1611.

Next he married Isabel Wray, the daughter of Judge Wray, and relict of Godfrey Foljambe, esq., but had no further issue. Sir William was succeeded by his nephew, Sir George Bowes.

(10) Robert Bowes (c1560)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529)

The son of Sir George's first marriage to Dorothy Mallory. He was killed in the Keswick mines in 1610,

(10) George Bowes (c1560)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529)

The son of Sir George's first marriage to Dorothy Mallory. Of Biddick, of Biddie-Waterville, county Durham. He married Magdalen [Margaret] Bray, the daughter of Sir Edward Bray and had issue. His first son, George, succeeded his uncle William in the Bradley estates.

(11) Ralph Bowes (1600)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) George Bowes (c1560)

He was baptized 25 Ocotber 1600. Of Hexham. The son of George Bowes of Biddick, county Durham. He married Dorothy Errington at St. Margaret's, Durham on 11 December 1629. They had seven children, all girls.

(11) Robert Bowes (c1590)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) George Bowes (c1560)

The second son, not succeeding. Of Beddick. He married Joan Hutton, of Marske, the daughter of Robert Hutton, D.D., Prebendary of Durham in 1620 and had several children. Joan was born in 1600. Robert and Joan had a daughter, Catherine, who married Christopher Hutton, of Marske, a merchant of Newcastle-on-Tyne. Christopher was the third son of Robert Hutton Jr., son and heir of of the Prebendary of Durham and the nephew of Joan [!!!].

The Hutton's of Marske

Seven times members of various Bowes family line's married into the family of the Huttons of Marske. Note also that Richard Bowes, born circa 1585, of the Sir Martin Bowes line, was the Lord of the manor of Hagthorpe, a one-time Hutton property. This probably also indicates a Hutton connection.

(1) Matthew Hutton

Of the village of Priest Hutton. He married and had two sons.

(2) Edmund Hutton
(1) Matthew Hutton

(3) Robert Hutton
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Edmund Hutton

D. D. Prebendary of Durham, and rector of Houghton-le-Spring, in the palatinate of Durham, for thirty-four years. "This learned divine, whose opinions verged on Puritanism was 1621, before the High Commission Court, for a sermon preached in the cathedral reflecting on the king, the bishop, and the ceremonies of the church. He married Grace Pilkington, daughter of Leonard Pilkington, D.D., brother of the Right Reverend James Pilkington, bishop of Durham, by whom (who d. 23 Nov 1633) he left at his decease one son and four daughters. I have a bill of complaint by him dealing with the sale of a horse dated 1608/9.

(4) Robert Hutton Jr. (1597)
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Edmund Hutton (3) Robert Hutton

The ancestor of the Huttons of Houghton-le-Spring, proprietors of an old hall and good estate there. He was born in 1597. In 1619 he married Elizabeth Fulthorpe, the daughter of Christopher Fulthorpe, Esquire of Tunstall. He died in 1643.

(5) Christopher Hutton
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Edmund Hutton (3) Robert Hutton (4) Robert Hutton Jr. (1597)

Christopher was the third son of Robert Hutton Jr. He married Catherine Bowes,the dauther of Robert Bowes, of Beddick, and his aunt, Joan.

(4) Joan Hutton (1600)
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Edmund Hutton (3) Robert Hutton

Also Joane. Of Marske, the daughter of Robert Hutton, D.D., Prebendary of Durham. She married (11) Robert Bowes (c1590), Esquire of Beddick [Biddic]. The second son of George Bowes of Bradley Hall and brother of Sir George Bowes, Knight. A daughter, Catherine, married Christopher Hutton, of Marske.

(2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525)
(1) Matthew Hutton

The younger son. The Huttons owed their establishment as a County family primarily to Matthew Hutton. He was the Dean of York in 1567, Bishop of Durham from 1589 to 1595, and Archbishop of York from 1595 to his death in 1606. "Of humble birth, he was born in 1525 in Priest Hutton, a small village in Warton parish, North Lancashire. He entered Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1546, and pursued his studies with such distinguished success, that, in 1557, he was made a Fellow of his College. Several valuable preferments followed, and, in 1589, he was promoted to the wealthy see of Durham, and five years later he was advanced to the Archiepiscopal chair of York. He died in January 1605-6, and lies buried under a handsome monument in York Minster.

"He married thrice, but by his first and second wives, Catherine Fulmesby, niece of Godrick, Bishop of Ely, (married in 1564) and Beatrice, daughter of Sir Thomas Fincham or Finshaw, knt. (she died in 1582) he had no issue; by the third, Frances Bowes, daughter [-in-law] of Sir Martin Bowes, knt. who died 10 Aug 1620, he was father of two sons and three daughters who lived to maturity. Another source, Matthew Hutton, Archbishop of York, notes that Frances was the widow of Martin Bowes, Frances Clopton Bowes. From the Archbishop's will:

"Item, I gyve and bequeathe unto my very loving frend, Mr Thomas Calverley, Mr John Calverley, Ann Calverley, Mr Henrie Dethrick, chancellor to the Lord Bishop of Carlile, to Richard Bowes, my wyve’s sonne, Mr John may, Mr Thomas Parmentor, Mr Thomas Bowes, and Christopher Davyll, my controuller, to every one of them, 40s in gold, to make them ringes."

(3) Sir Timothy Hutton
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525)

Esquire. In 1592 his father gave Timothy the sum of £1900 to enable him to purchase a jointure for his wife, and subsequently bequeathed to him the manors of Wharram Percy and Hagthorpe together with a number of valuable church leases. During his father’s lifetime, Sir Timothy (1569-1629) bought the Marrick Abbey estate (1592), the manor of Marske (1598), and considerable property in Richmond. He was knighted in 1605. Following his succession in 1606, his total estate revenue amounted to £1077 a year. Sir Timothy was noted for his charity and hospitality; purchases of luxury good in London. He was Bowbearer of Arkengarthdale, an office which appears to have been of negligible value. In 1605-6 he served as Sheriff of Yorkshire, and was fined £230 for the unsatisfactory performance of certain duties. This fine was levied in 1612 and the same year he sold the manor of Hagthorpe, worth £82 a year [to Richard Bowes?]. In 1617, on the marriage of his eldest son, he entailed most of the estate which was then producing a total income of £1449 a year. He was High Sheriff in 1607. He died in 1629.

He married Elizabeth Bowes, the daughter of (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) of Streatlam Castle, by his second wife, Jane, daughter of Sir John Talbot.

(4) Matthew Hutton, Esq. (1597)
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525) (3) Sir Timothy Hutton

Esquire, of Marske. He was born on 22 October 1597. In his later years Timothy Hutton had to assist his son Matthew (1597-1666) whose extravagance had brought him into heavy debt. After entering into his father’s estate, Matthew proceeded to sell the manor of Marske (1630) and the Marrick Abbey property (1631). Both these properties had been included in the entail of 1617, and because of this Matthew’s heir was able to regain possession of Marske twenty years later. In 1638 Matthew bought lands in Durham, borrowing £2000 for this purpose. On the outbreak of the Civil War his income amounted to rather more than £300 a year while his debts were well in excess of £4000. Known as "One of the most violent cavaliers in the county". He married Barbara, the eldest daughter of Sir Conyers D'Arcy, with whom he had most of his land dealings.

(5) John Hutton (1626)
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525) (3) Sir Timothy Hutton (4) Matthew Hutton, Esq. (1597)

Esquire, of Marske. He was born on 6 September 1626. The son and heir of Matthew Hutton. He experienced considerable difficulty in recovering the Marske manor from the Sir Conyers Darcy, who received it from Mathew in payment of debts. He, however, obtained permission to try his title at law, and so recovered Marske. It was again seized for some reason by the Committee for compounding, but in 1651 his title was allowed and the sequestration discharged. He married Frances. He had a twin, Timothy.

(6) John Hutton (1659)
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525) (3) Sir Timothy Hutton (4) Matthew Hutton, Esq. (1597) (5) John Hutton (1626)

Esquire, of Marske. He was born on 14 July 1659.

(7) John Hutton (1691)
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525) (3) Sir Timothy Hutton (4) Matthew Hutton, Esq. (1597) (5) John Hutton (1626) (6) John Hutton (1659)

(8) John Hutton (1730)
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525) (3) Sir Timothy Hutton (4) Matthew Hutton, Esq. (1597) (5) John Hutton (1626) (6) John Hutton (1659) (7) John Hutton (1691)

(8) Anne Hutton (1731)
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525) (3) Sir Timothy Hutton (4) Matthew Hutton, Esq. (1597) (5) John Hutton (1626) (6) John Hutton (1659) (7) John Hutton (1691)

She married George-Wanley Bowes, esquire of Thornton, in York.

(7) Matthew Hutton D.D. (1692)
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525) (3) Sir Timothy Hutton (4) Matthew Hutton, Esq. (1597) (5) John Hutton (1626) (6) John Hutton (1659)

Successively Bishop of Bangor, Archbishop of York from 1747 to 1757, and of Canterbury. He died on 19 March 1758.

(4) Timothy Hutton Jr. (1601)
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525) (3) Sir Timothy Hutton

A merchant of Leeds.

(4) Philipp Hutton
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (1525) (3) Sir Timothy Hutton

He married Elizabeth Bowes, the daughter of Thomas Bowes, the eighth son of Sir George Bowes, of Sreatlam Castle.

(3) Sir Thomas Bowes
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton

Of Popleton. He married Ann Bennet, the daughter of Sir John Bennet, of Dawley, near Uxbridge.

(4) Elizabeth Bowes
(1) Matthew Hutton (2) Dr. Matthew Hutton (3) Sir Thomas Bowes

She was born on 17 February 1619. She first married John Robinson. esquire of Deighton and secondly, Edward Bowes, of York.

In summary, the Bowes-Hutton marriages were:

(2) Dr. Matthew Hutton, son of Matthew Hutton, and Frances Clopton Bowes, widow of Martin Bowes of London.
(3) Sir Timothy Hutton, son of Dr. Matthew Hutton, and Elizabeth Bowes, daughter of Sir George Bowes of Streatlam Castle.
(4) Phillip Hutton, son of Sir Timothy Hutton, and Elizabeth Bowes, grand-daughter of Sir George Bowes.
(4) Elizabeth Hutton, daughter of Sir Thomas Hutton, Timothy's brother, and Edward Bowes of York.

(4) Joan Hutton, daughter of Robert Hutton, and Robert Bowes of Beddick, son of George Bowes of Bradley Hall.
(5) Christopher Hutton, son of Robert Hutton Jr., and Catherine Bowes, daugther of Robert Bowes of Beddick.

(8) Ann Hutton and George-Wanley Bowes.
Most of this was extracted from "The Yorkshire Gentry, from the Reformation to the Civil War" by J.T. Cliffe and Burke's Commoners.


(11) Sir George Bowes (c1590)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) George Bowes (c1560)

He succeeded his Uncle, Sir William Bowes. Knight. Sometime of Biddick and of Cleatlam and afterwards of Bradley. Called the "heir-general to all the family" in Burke's Commoners, that is of all the Bowes of Bradley Hall family. He married Mary De La Val, the eldest daughter of Sir Ralph De La Val [Delaval, Deleval], of Seaton De La Val.

The De La Val Family

The Bowes family also married into the De La Val clan several times. Sir William, as above, to Mary De La Val, and Sir Francis Bowes, of Thornton, below, to Margaret De Val. Ralph De La Val's wife, Jane Hilton, was the daughter of Anne Bowes, of Streatlam Castle, and Anne's second husband was Sir John Delaval of Dissington. Sarah Delaval, Lady Tyrconnel, while she did not marry him, was on initimate terms with John Bowes, the 10th Earl of Strathmore.

Mb>(xx-1) Seigneur Guy De La Val (c980)

Of La Val or La Val Guion, in Maine, France.

(xx) Seigneur Guy De La Val II (c1000)

Of La Val or La Val Guion, in Maine, France. A grant he made in 1066 to the Abbey of Marmoutier notes that he was considerably sticken in years at the time. He died in 1067.

(xx+1) Hamon De La Val (c1020)

Or Hamo. Called the "Young." He was a nephew by marriage to William the Conqueror. He joined the army of Duke William for the invasion of England. The King granted them lands in Seaton, Callerton and Dissington. A Norman chapel, the Church of Our Lady, still remains as originally built. He succeeded his father in the lordship of Laval in 1067. He died in 1080.

(xx+2) Guy De La Val III (c1040)

Called the "Bald." He joined the army of Duke William for the invasion of England with his father. Guy was rewarded by the Conqueror, in 1078, with the hand of his niece Denise, daughter of Robert, Earl of Mortain and Cornwall. He second married Cecile, a kinswoman of the Counts of Mayenne. He died in 1095 and was buried at Marmoutier beside his first wife.

The family's wealth came, first, from the salt pans at the Seaton Sluice. Later large deposits of coal were found on their land. The family nearly died out in the 15th Century, but a James Horsley, whose mother was a Delaval, changed his name so the line could continue.

(??) Hugh De La Val

In the first year of the reign of Henry I the King dispossessed Robert de Laci of all his estates for supporting the cause of his brother, Duke Robert of Normandy, in their dispute over the crown upon the death of William II. Henry bestowed de Laci's castle and lands on Hugh de la Val. Unfortunately for Hugh, Robert was allowed to return after a few years and was given back his properties. These lands were the fee of Pontefract and Clitheroe. This event is sometimes attributed to a Guy de la Val.

(??) Gilbert De La Val

A Magna Carta Baron, that is one whose loyalty was visible against King John. While not one of the Surety Barons, he was in arms to procure the Great Charter of Liberties from King John from 1213 to 1215.

(3) John Delaval (c1370)

On 28 September 1423 John Delaval of Newsham made a settlement of his lands in Newsham and Blythesnook on his daughter and heir, Elizabeth, in marriage with John Horsley.

(4) Elizabeth Delaval (c1400)

She married John Horsley in 1423.

(5) James Horsley/Delaval (c1430)

The son of John and Elizabeth Horsley. He changed his name to Delaval. "James de la Vale of Seton de la Vale, otherwise called James Horseley" inherited Newsham and Blythesnook. On the death of his kinswoman dame Elizabeth Burcester in 1469, he succeeded to Seaton Delaval. His succession was disputed by Marquis Montague, Sheriff of Northumberland 1466-71, and James was imprisoned in Newcastle and then London. Delaval was forced to release his rights, but when Montague fell at Barnet in 1471 he obtained restoration. On 9 July 1484 he received a royal pardon. He married Margery Mitford, the daughter of Robert Mitford. They had four sons, John, Robert, Guy and Anthony.

(6) John De La Val (c1460)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval

Of Seaton Delaval. Before 20 June 1492 John Delaval married Anne Grey, the daughter of Sir Thomas Grey, of Chillingham, and and Margaret Greystoke. He died on 4 February 1497/8.

(7) George De La Val (1493)

By an inquisition 30 September 1505 it was found that George Delaval was son and heir of John Delaval and was three years old at his father's death. He died 15 March 1513/14 before he could be married to Elizabeth, daughter of Richard, Lord Lumley, as earlier contracted. His heir was his brother John, born posthumously, 16 April 1498.

(7) Sir John De La Val (1498)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val

John Delaval was a prominent man on the border for which he was knighted. Sir John was five times sheriff of Northumberland, 1527, 1533, 1542, 1548 and 1554. He married Mary Carey, the daughter of Thomas Carey, of Chilton, and Margaret Spencer. His will is dated 4 December 1562 and he died on 14 December 1562.

(8) Edward De La Val (c1515)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498)

A younger son of Sir John. From him are descended the Delavals of Tynemouth.

(8) Sir John De La Val (1512)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498)

He was born in 1512. The eldest son and heir was "John Dellavell" who was his'full and sole executor'. An inquisition taken 10 November 1563 after the death of old Sir John Delaval it was found that his heir was his son John then aged 40. Like his father, John Delaval became a knight and served as Sheriff of Northumberland in 1565 and 1571. He was already married at his father's death and had three sons, Robert, Henry and Thomas, and a daughter, Jane. He married Anne Ogle, the daughter of Ralph Ogle, 3rd Baron Ogle, and Margaret Gascoigne. He died in 1572. He also had a younger son, Thomas.

(9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512)

He was born in 1542. The eldest son Robert was aged 30 at his father's death. He served as Sheriff in 1575, 1583 and 1592 and was knighted on 13 April 1603. He married Dorothy Grey, the daughter of Sir Ralph Grey, of Chillingham, and Isabel. He died on 1 January 1606/7.

(10) Sir Ralph De La Val (1576)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542)

The eldest son, he succeeded his father in 1607. He was born in about 1577. Ralph's younger son Thomas left a 'catalogue of the acts' of his father, in which he tells us "He was a justice of the peace, of the quorum, in commission of oyer and terminer, the custos rotulorum, a deputy lieutenant; he had been three times sheriff of Northumberland; he was a commissioner for the Borders, one of the high commissioners of Durham, and was twice called upon to give the King an account of county affairs ....." When Sir Ralph died on 24 November 1628 his grandson and heir, Ralph, succeeded to a heavily encumbered estate.

Ralph married Jane Hilton. She was the daughter of Thomas Hilton, of Alston, and Anne Bowes. In turn, Anne was the daughter of George Bowes of Streatlam and Jane Talbot. More fun, Anne Bowes Hilton's second husband was Sir John Delaval of Dissington - these families are so incestous it begins to look like West Virginia. Ralph and Jane reputedly had 20 children. Ralph died in 1625.

(11) Mary De La Val (c1600)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir Ralph De La Val (1576)

She married George Bowes, of Bradley Hall. Their daughter, Anne, went on to marry Francis Blakiston. Their grand-daughter, Elizabeth Blakiston, married William Bowes, of Streatlam Castle.

(11) Unknown De La Val (c1600)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir Ralph De La Val (1576)

He predeceased his father.

(12) Ralph De La Val (1622)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir Ralph De La Val (1576) (11) Unknown De La Val (c1600)

Baronet. He succeed his grandfather, old Sir Ralph De La Val, in 1628. The young heir was left with £100 per year. He had been educated at Oxford and matriculated at Queen's College 15 June 1638 and was admitted to Lincoln's Inn 28 November 1639. At the age of 24 he married Anne Leslie, the widow of Hughe Fraser, and daughter of Alexander Leslie, first earl of Leven, at St. Nicholas' Newcastle, on 2 April 1646.

On account of his marriage Ralph Delaval had close ties with the Presbyterians and was in favour with the Parliamentarians. In November 1649 he became the first Sheriff of Northumberland under the Commonwealth and was returned MP for Northumberland to Richard Cromwell's Parliament of 1659. After the Restoration he was MP for Northumberland in 1660 but lost his seat in 1661. Knighted by Charles II in 1660, he was created baronet 29 June 1660. He was elected to the Long Parliament in 1677 and served as MP on three subsequent occasions, March and October 1679 and March 1681. He was successful in his venture into coal mining at Hartley and he created local trade when he built the harbour at Seaton Sluice.

The first baronet's two eldest sons died in his lifetime, and, on his death on 29 August 1691, he was succeeded by his third son, Sir Ralph.

(13) Sir Ralph De La Val (c1650)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir Ralph De La Val (1576) (11) Unknown De La Val (c1600) (12) Ralph De La Val (1622)

Baronet. He died in 1696 and his personal estate went to pay his debts. Seaton Delaval and Hartley passed to his widow under the marriage settlement. A lease, dated 19 October 1699, refers to the Honorable Lady Diana Delaval, widow of Sir Ralph Delaval, baranet." His only daughter, Diana [named for her mother?], married William Blackett, son of Edward Blackett of Newby, Yorkshire, in 1699.

(13) Sir John De La Val (c1680)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir Ralph De La Val (1576) (11) Unknown De La Val (c1600) (12) Ralph De La Val (1622) (13) Sir Ralph De La Val (c1650)

Of Hartley. He succeeded his brother, Ralph, in the baronetcy and entailed estate. Sir John had a distinguished military career, having served in Flanders, and rose to the rank of Colonel in the Guards. By the end of the 17th Century, the Delaval Estates were in crisis due to ill-conceived will making, lawsuits and contesting of rights to land. Sir John was crippled by a legacy due to his niece, Diana, and secured on the estate. Unable to pay the marriage portion, which, with interest at her death, amounted to over £14,000, Seaton Delaval was sold to Admiral George Delaval, of Dissington, north of Newcastle-on-Tyne, a distant kinsman of John.

The De La Val's of Dissington

(10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542)

Of Dishington. He marrried Elizabeth Selby. The Selby's of Newcastle were part of the inner-circle of Hostmen that ran the coal trade in Durham. They were also part of the Grand Lease which controlled the mines. His second wife was Ann Bowes, the widow of Thomas Hilton, of Alston. She was the daughter of Sir George Bowes, of Streatlam Castle, and Jane Talbot. He died on 8 December 1652.

(11) George De La Val
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577)

He married Margaret Grey. He died in March 1694/5.

(12) Vice Admiral Sir George De La Val (1660)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577) (11) George De La Val

Admiral George Delaval was a younger son of George Delaval, of North Dissington, who only received a legacy of £100 from his father. However a combined naval and diplomatic career brought him an enormous fortune. He was envoy to Morocco 1700 and 1707 and Portugal 1710, Rear Admiral 1718 and Vice Admiral 1722. He apparently made much of his wealth through buying supplies for the British Army. A little skimming perhaps? He also bought the forfeited estate of Bavington as well as Seaton Delaval. Between 1719 and his death in 1723 he built the new hall at Seaton Delaval, left, designed by Vanburgh, the architect of Blenheim Palace, and occupied himself in planting and improving the estate. He died in 1723 at the age of 55 leaving Bavington to his sister's son George Shafto, and the remainder of his estates to his brother's son, Captain Francis Blake Delaval, Royal Navy.

(12) Captain Robert De La Val
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577) (11) George De La Val

The brother of George De La Val. He was Captain of the FALCON, a 32-gun 4th-rate, i.e. a frigate.

(12) Edward De La Val (1664)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577) (11) George De La Val

He was born in October 1664. He married Mary Blake. He died on 3 August 1744. He was the father of Francis Blake De La Val, below.

(13) Francis Blake De La Val (1692)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577) (11) George De La Val (12) Edward De La Val (1664)

He was born in 1692. Francis was a naval Captain who had little money of his own, so although he inherited the large Seaton Delaval estates, his income was relatively low. His situation was ameliorated when he inherited Ford Castle and estates on the death of his mother. He then married a rich heiress, Rhoda Apreece of Doddington, in Lincolnshire. She was the daughter of Robert Apreece, Esq., of Walhingley, Hants., and grand-daughter and heiress of Sir Thomas Hussey of Doddington, in Lincolnshire. Rhoda willed this estate to her second son and other sons in succession - excluding her eldest son who was heir to the Seaton Delaval estate - on the provision that whichever of them, or their heirs, should become entitled to is should take the name of Hussey. Francis also inherited his father's Northumberland estate at Dissington.

Francis moved in to Delaval hall around 1726 and over the next 20 years had 8 sons and 4 daughters. As his children grew older the Delaval reputation for gay and exciting living began. "As youngsters they had everything that wealth could offer but between them and their children they burnt up the family fortunes in a way which was spectacular even for the 18th century." Seven of the Captain's sons and his only legitimate grandson all died unnatural deaths. Francis died in 1752 after falling down the steps of the hall.

(14) Rhoda De La Val (1725)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577) (11) George De La Val (12) Edward De La Val (1664) (13) Francis Blake De La Val (1692)

Eldest child of Captain Delaval. Like all her family she was celebrated for her beauty and accomplishments, she was an artist of repute. She married Sir Edward Astley of Melton Constable. Her only son eventually inherited the Delaval estates on the death of the last Delaval in 1814.

(14) Sir Francis Blake De La Val II (1727)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577) (11) George De La Val (12) Edward De La Val (1664) (13) Francis Blake De La Val (1692)

Eldest son of Captain Delaval inherited the estate on the death of his father in 1752. The most notorious of the family, a practical joker with a flair for theatrical entertainment, he was not really interested in running the estates, he left that to his brothers. His principle interest was the pursuit of pleasure, but he was elected a Member of Parliament on three occasions, usually by dubious means. He also became a soldier for a while and was decorated for bravery in 1760. He spent his life in debt, and married an elderly widow, Isabella Paulet, in 1750 simply to get her money. He had several mistresses and at least two illegitimate children. Francis Blake Delaval died alone in London in 1771 leaving large debts which were never paid off. He was buried in the Chapel of Our Lady after an extravagant funeral.

(14) John Hussey De La Val (1728)
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577) (11) George De La Val (12) Edward De La Val (1664) (13) Francis Blake De La Val (1692)

He took over management of the estates even before the death of his brother. A good organizer and manager, he completely reorganized the estates. At the Ford estates he brought farming practice, which had changed little in centuries, right up to date. Farm rents went up 10 times in about 30 years. With his brother Thomas, he modernized Seaton Sluice harbour and introduced glass making, improved productivity in the coal pits and introduced pumping engines etc. He made the estates profitable. From his mother, Rhoda, he inherited Doddington Hall and estates.

He married twice. By his first wife he had several children but unfortunately his son predeceased him. He was made a Baron in 1776 and died in 1808. He left the Ford estates to his wife and granddaughter. The Delaval and Doddington estates were entailed and went to his surviving brother Edward.

(15) Sarah Hussey Delaval
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577) (11) George De La Val (12) Edward De La Val (1664) (13) Francis Blake De La Val (1692) (14) John Hussey De La Val (1728)

John's favorite daughter, her father left her his favorite property, the Ford estate. She married George Carpenter, the 2nd Earl of Tyrconnel. The Delaval and Bowes families continued to be initimate and the Gibside estate of the Bowes' was thereby haunted. The ghost is supposed to be Sarah. She lived with John Bowes, the 10th Earl of Strathmore, on rather too intimate terms. A lover of the theatre, John Bowes had become attached to her during amateur theatricals at Seaton Delaval Hall. Lady Tyrconnel died of consumption and her funeral in 1800 almost bankrupted the estate. He had her lie in state, with painted face and decked in jewels and Brussels lace from head to toe, in every town on the way to London, before final burial in Westminster Abbey. The Duke of York, son of the King, had been a great admirer's of hers as well.

(14) Edward Hussey De La Val
(5) James Horsley/Delaval (6) John De La Val (7) Sir John De La Val (1498) (8) Sir John De La Val (1512) (9) Sir Robert De La Val (1542) (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577) (11) George De La Val (12) Edward De La Val (1664) (13) Francis Blake De La Val (1692)

Edward Hussey Delaval's early life was devoted to study and scientific experiments. He was a fellow of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge and spent most of his life in London and rarely visited Seaton Delaval. His friends and associates were scholars and he wrote papers on artificial gemstones, lightening conductors etc. Edward spent his last years at Doddington and never visited Seaton Delaval after his brother's death. He was the last of the line. His brother, Thomas, died in Germany; Robert was slain at the battle of Quebec; George was drowned at sea; Henry fell on the battlefield in the West Indies; and Ralph died in infancy. The estate therefore passed to the Astley family of Melton Constable.


I don't as yet know where Margaret De La Val, who married Francis Bowes, below, fits in.

"Mary, widow of Sir George Bowes . . . 1650, July 5. Her petition is that Sir Geo. Bowes, knt., her late husband and father of Ralph Bowes and her seven other children, being born to a very fair estate was obliged to sell the best part of the same and of petitioner's right thereto inorder to release himself from other entanglements. In the fear that little would be left for herself and children she was advised that some new estate should be bought in the name of friends, over which Sir Geo. should have no disposing power. Accordingly in 1637 Bradley Manor, Y.V., 103l. above the rent payable to the Exchequer, was bought in the names of Tobit Bowes of Harrington, and John Hilton of Hilton, gent., in trust for them . . ." - from "Records of Committees for Compounding, Etc., with Delinquent Royalists in Durham . . ."

On 8 August 1659 a Sir George Bowes and Francis Bowes, gentleman, were restored to their former freedoms of Newcastle - from the archives of Parliament. Was this our George and was this related to the Civil War? Who was Francis? A possible brother? I have a Francis Bowes who was born on 24 August 1597 in Bishopwearmouth, Durham. Wearmouth is now known as Sunderland. Sir George acknowledged, see below, that Sir Francis Bowes, was a member of the "Bowes" family and had a right to wear its arms.

George's daughter, Ann, married Sir Francis Blakiston. Sir Francis' only daughter and heiress of Gibside, Elizabeth Blakiston, married Sir William Bowes, of Streatlam, on 17 August 1691 at Tanfield.

(12) Ralph Bowes (1627)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) George Bowes (c1560) (11) Sir George Bowes (c1590)

He was baptized on 12 September 1627.Esquire, of Bradley Hall. He married Margaret Cradock on 229 January 1649. She was the second daughter of Sir Joseph Cradock of Richmond, knight.

(13) George Bowes (c1650)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) George Bowes (c1560) (11) Sir George Bowes (c1590) (12) Ralph Bowes (c1620)

Esquire, of Bradley Hall.

(14) Thomas Bowes (c1680)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) George Bowes (c1560) (11) Sir George Bowes (c1590) (12) Ralph Bowes (c1620) (13) George Bowes (c1650)

Esquire, of Bradley Hall, county Durham. He married Elizabeth Pickering, the daughter of John Pickering, esquire of Hedley Hall. His chidren were George, Robert, Sarah and Jane - from "A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Enjoying..." by John Burke. Written into this book is "Lancelot (merchant of Durham)" as another son.


The following descent was provided by Jackie Lock, of South Africa, a descendent via (18) Isabella Ellena Alice Turvey. She has added a daughter, Jane, to Thomas Bowes' children.

(15) Jane Bowes
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) George Bowes (c1560) (11) Sir George Bowes (c1590) (12) Ralph Bowes (c1620) (13) George Bowes (c1650) (14) Thomas Bowes (c1680)

The second daughter of Thomas Bowes. She married Jacob Grieve, esq. - from "A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Enjoying..." by John Burke. "sp: Jacob Grieve (m.Unknown)." - Jackie Lock. "1749 [or 1756]. Oct. 16. Jacob Grieve, attorney-at-law, married to Miss Jenny Bowes, second daughter of Thomas Bowes, esq., of Bradley . . . 1750. Sept. About the beginning of this month Jacob Grieve, attorney-at-law, dismissed Jane, his wife, the youngest of the two daughters of Tho. Bowes of Bradley, esq. He had detected her of . . . [something about Benjamin Gray son of . . . ]" - from "Six North Country Diaries" by John Crawford Hodgson.

The attorney's Savile, Wyvill and George Grieve were associated with the Bowes family in a presentation to the Commons.

(16) Mary Elizabeth Grieve (c.29 May 1757)

sp: Robert Taylor (b.29 May 1757;m.Unknown;d.9 Aug 1835)

(17) George Bowes Taylor (b.1798)

sp: Mrs Mary Ann Jefferson (b.1812;m.1845). I was provided the following information by Jackie Lock.

"George Bowes Taylor B1798 Durham D1881 Kendal was married twice. Firstly to Sarah Garside B abt 1805 Married 19 May 1828 at St Mary’s, Walton on the Hill, Liverpool and died sometime before 1845.

With this marriage, they had:
John Taylor B abt 1829 Chester le Street, Durham
Elizabeth B Taylor B abt 1831 Chester le Street, Durham
Robert Taylor B abt 1833 Chester le Street, Durham – He died on 24 January 1865 on his way home from Bonny, West Coast of Africa.
Ann Taylor B abt 1836 Chester le Street, Durham
Sarah Georgina Taylor B abt 1840 Chester le Street, Durham

George Bowes Taylor then married on 17 October 1845 in St Augustine, Everton, Liverpool to Mary Ann Jefferson. She was born Mary Ann Rothwell on 6 April 1811 Liverpool. She was widowed when she married George.

George Jefferson Bowes Taylor was born in April 1852 to parents George and Mary Ann."

(18) George Jefferson Bowes Taylor (b.1852;d.17 May 1917)

sp: Isabella Ellena Alice Turvey (b.9 Nov 1857;m.1862;d.1916). sp: Sarah Georgina Garside (d.1845)

(17) Jane Taylor

(17) Dorothy Taylor

(17) Jacob Taylor (d.Died young)

(17) Aulty ? Taylor

(17) Thos ? Taylor

(17) George Bowes Taylor (d.died young)

(17) Jane Taylor

sp: Anthony

(15) George Bowes (c1710)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) George Bowes (c1560) (11) Sir George Bowes (c1590) (12) Ralph Bowes (c1620) (13) George Bowes (c1650) (14) Thomas Bowes (c1680)

Esquire, of Bradley Hall. He died without issue.

(15) Robert Bowes (c1710)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) George Bowes (c1560) (11) Sir George Bowes (c1590) (12) Ralph Bowes (c1620) (13) George Bowes (c1650) (14) Thomas Bowes (c1680)

He succeeded his brother, George. Esquire, of Bradley Hall. He married Ann Clement, the only daughter and heiress of Ralph Clement, esquire. Burke's Commoners, to the contrary, shows that George was succeeded by his son, Thomas, who was succeeded by his son, Thomas, below.

(16) Thomas Bowes (1758)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) George Bowes (c1560) (11) Sir George Bowes (c1590) (12) Ralph Bowes (c1620) (13) George Bowes (c1650) (14) Thomas Bowes (c1680) (15) Robert Bowes (c1710)

"Thomas Bowes, esq. of Bradley Hall, in the county of Durham, born 29 Jun 1758." - from Burke's Commoners. He succeeded his father, Robert Bowes. Of Bradley Hall. He was the last male representative in name and descent of the Bowes family of Streatlam. The Bowes-Lyon family now holds that estate.


The Bowes of Streatlam Castle

The following are the children of Sir George Bowes and his second wife, Jane Talbot. They continue the line that ended with the Bowes-Lyon connection to the royal family.

(10) Talbot Bowes (c1565)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529)

Of Streatlam and of Aske. The eldest son of the second marriage of Sir George Bowes to Jane Talbot. He succeeded, "by a strange will or entail made by Sir George about the year 1590," to the Streatlam estate. He married Agnes Warcop. Note that Talbot's brother, Thomas, married Agnes' sister, Anne. Member of Parliament for Richmond.

In 1607 the name of Talbot Bowes, then of Chelsea, Middlesex, Esq., Agnes, his wife, and his brother, Thomas, were on a number of leases, including for Cote House, which was eventually sold, in 1735, to George Bowes of Steatlam, Esq. An indenture document of 7 October 1611 is "From Talbot Bowes of Richmond, Esq., and Thomas Bowes of the same, his brother, to Michael Langstaffe of Mickleton and others." He died in 1637 and the estate devolved to his eldest surviving brother, Thomas.

He sold Aske Hall to Philip, Lord Wharton.

(10) Francis Bowes (c1565)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529)

He was born circa 1581 per LDS database. He married Joan Headlam, the daughter of William Hedlam, in 1554. Their children were William (b1589), Robert (b1590), Toby (b1592), Francis (b1594 in Barnes, Durham), Richard (b1595), George (b1597), Joan, Thomas (b1599), Eleanor, Joan, Anne and Ralph (b1606).

(11) Joan Bowes (c1598)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Francis Bowes (c1565)

She married Ralph Bowes. I don't know what part of the family he came from.

(10) Richard Bowes (c1565)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529)

Matriculated from Trinity College, Cambridge in 1588. Admitted at Gray's Inn on3 November 1587. He died in 1599, apparently d.s.p. He was buried at Richmond, Yorkshire on 31 August 1599. Brother of John (1591).

(10) John Bowes (c1560)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529)

The youngest brother. He matriculated from St. John's College, Cambridge circa 1591. Admitted at Gray's Inn on 22 October 1595. He married Ursula Davel, the daughter of Chrisopher Deyvill, of Cuckwold, Yorkshire. Their children were Jane and Eleanor. Living in 1606. Brother of Richard (1588) and Thomas (1591).

(10) Ralph Bowes
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529)

Questionable as a son of Sir George. He married Elizabeth Clifford in about 1509. Their daughter, Margery, married Ralph Eure.

(10) Elizabeth Bowes
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529)

She married Sir Timothy Hutton, of Marske. The son of the Archbishop of York, he was a graduate of Trinity College. Knighted 1605/6. High Sheriff of York. Elizabeth and Timothy left a will which identifies her surviving siblings, Sir Talbot, Thomas, John, and Jane.

(10) Thomas Bowes (c1565-75)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529)

Of Gray's Inn. He married Anne Warcop, the sister of Agnes, above, the wife of Talbot. He matriculated from St. John's College, Cambridge circa 1591. Admitted at Gray's Inn on 22 October 1595. Of Chelsea, 1607; also of Streatlam Castle. He died in 1654, at about the same time as his brother, Talbot. I have another source that says he was buried at Barnard Castle on 12 June 1636. His children were Talbot, Thomas, William, and Anne.

(11) Talbot Bowes (1603)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes

Of Streatlam Castle. He probably succeeded his uncle, Talbot Bowes and/or his father, Thomas. He was born on 29 May 1603 in Streatlam. A Talbot Bowes sold the Aske estate to Philip, Lord Wharton. There is a Talbot Bowes in the reign of Charles I in 1642. He died on 6 December 1654. I don't show a marriage or any children for Talbot. Another source makes it clear that he died unmarried.

(11) Thomas Bowes (1607)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes

Of Streatlam Castle. He was baptized on 23 December 1607. He succeeded his brother, Talbot, at Streatlam. He was born in 1607. He married Anne Maxton, the daughter and co-heir of Anthony Maxton, prebendary of Durham and chaplain of Charles I. Their children were Talbot, Thomas, Anthony, William, John, George, Anne, Maxton, Jane, and Dorothy. He died in 1661.

(12) Talbot Bowes (1649)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607)

He was was born in 1649, christened on 27 January 1650 in Barnard Castle, Durham, and died the same year.

(12) Thomas Bowes (1653)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607)

He was born in 1653. He died in 1673.

(12) Anthony Bowes (1655)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607)

He was born in 1655. I have an Anthony, "perhaps" the son of Thomas of Streatham, who was admitted to Trinity College, Cambridge on 8 May 1669, who died young. May not be our Anthony because he supposedly died in 1657.

(12) John Bowes D.D. (1658)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607)

He may be the twin brother of George. He was educated in Durham and was admitted to Trinity College, Cambridge on 29 August 1676. Son of Thomas Bowes of Steatlam Castle, Durham. He attended Durham school. Matriculated from Trinity College, Cambridge in 1676. Scholar 1679. B.A. 1680-1. M.A. 1684. Doctor of Divinity 1698. Incorporated at Oxford in 1704. Probably ordained deacon in Durham on 21 September 1684. Rector of Wycliffe, Yorkshire 1691-7. Prebend of Durham in 1696. Rector of Elwick, Durham, 1701-15. Rector of Bishop Wearmouth 1715-21. He died in 1721 and was buried in Durham Cathedral on 16 January 1721/2. The Brother of George (1676) and William (1672). John Bowes grandfather on his mother's side was the famous Anthony Maxton, D.D. who became Chaplain to the ill-fated King Charles I.

(12) George Bowes (1659)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607)

Admitted to Trinity College, Cambridge on 29 August 1676. The third son of Thomas Bowes of Durham. Admitted at the Middle Temple on 15 May 1677. Solicitor-general to Lord Crewe, Bishop of Durham in 1694. Recorder of the City of Durham in 1706. He married Anne Salvin. He Died on 14 May 1724 at the age of 65. He was buried at St Mary-le-Bow. The Brother of John (admitted 1676) and William (admitted 1676).

(12) Sir William Bowes (1656)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607)

Perhaps the second son of Thomas Bowes, of Streatlam Castle. He probably succeeded his father, Thomas Bowes. He was born in 1656/7. Of Streatlam Castle. Admitted to Trinity College, Cambridge on 26 May 1672. M.A. in 1675. Admitted at Gray's Inn on 4 June 1672. Of Barnhard Castle, Durham. Member of Parliament for Durham 1679-81-85, 1695-8, 1702-5. Knighted on 13 April 1684.

He married Elizabeth Blakiston, the heiress of Gibside, near Gateshead, on 17 August 1691 at Tanfield. She was the daughter of Sir Francis Blakiston and Ann Bowes, the daughter of Sir George Bowes of Bradley Hall. From this marriage came much of the wealth of the Bowes family as the Gibside estates lay over rich coal seams and he had a hand in developing the iron works at Blaydon. He died on 16 January 1706/7 and was bured at Barnard Castle. Their children were William Blakiston, Thomas (d1722), George, Anne, Elizabeth, Jane and Margaret.

One surviving symbol of their wealth is a the Bowes cup, a two handled gold cup created during the reign of Charles II. It is engraved with the arms and motto of Sir William Bowes. The cup was probably a race prize. In 1695 Sir William, a successful breeder of race horses, proposed to the Bishop of Durham that money be raised to buy trophies and plate to be raced for on Durham Moor. A cup of gold with the Bowes arms and crest would have been a lavish but appropriate prize, perhaps won at a race meeting in County Durham.

The male representative of this line vested eventually in Thomas Bowes, of Bradley Hall, county Durham. The Earl of Strathmore descends in the female line through John Lyon who married the daughter of George Bowes.

(13) Sir William Blakiston Bowes (1696)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656)

The eldest son of Sir William of Streatlam Castle. He was born in Westminster on 1 January 1696-7 and baptized at Whickham. He attended school in Durham. He was admitted at Trinity College, Cambridge on 25 September 1707. He died in 1721, unmarried, but during his life went a long way towards rebuilding Streatlam Castle. He was buried at Barnard Castle on 17 October 1721. Brother of Thomas (Cambridge 1718).

(13) Thomas Bowes (1700)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656)

Son of Sir William Bowes of Streatlam Castle. He attended Kensington school, London. Admitted at Trinity College, Cambridge on 13 September 1718. He was buried at Kensington in 1722.

(13) Sir George Bowes (1701)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656)

He was born on 21 August 1701 in Streatham Castle. The third of four sons, he inherited upon his brothers' deaths. He was the Member of Parliament for County Durham in 1727-34-41-47-54. Of Streatlam and Gibside. He married Eleanor Verney in October 1724. She died in 1725 and he secondly married Mary Gilbert in 1746. He died on 17 September 1760 and was buried as WHickham.











The Bowes-Lyon Family

See also Bowes and Strathmores.

(14) Mary Eleanor Bowes (1749)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656) (13) Sir George Bowes (1701)

The daughter and only child of Sir George Bowes. She was born on 24 February 1749. She became the heiress to the Bowes wealth, the estates and a fortune of more than a million pounds. She married John Lyon, 9th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne. He brought Glamis castle into the family. A condition of the marriage settlement was that the name of the family would henceforth be Bowes. It became Bowes-Lyon later. From this marriage is descended the late Queen Mother, Elizabeth, and her daughter Elizabeth II, Queen of England.

The Lyon Family

(8) Patrick Lyon (1575)

9th Lord Glamis, 1st Earl of Kinghorne. He was born in 1575. He married Anne Murray in June 1595. She was born on 27 February 1618, the daughter of John Murray, 1st Earl of Tullibardine. Patrick died on 19 December 1615.

(9) John Lyon (1596)

2nd Earl of Kinghorne. He was born on 13 August 1596. He married first Margaret Erskine on 19 June 1618. She was the daughter of John Erskine, 7th Earl of Mar. Secondly he married Elizabeth Maule sometime after November 1640. She was the daughter of Patrick Maule, 1st Earl of Panmure. John died on 12 May 1646.

(10) Patrick Lyon (1643)

3rd Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne. He was born on 29 May 1643. He married Helen Middleton on 23 August 1662. She was the daughter of John Middleton, 1st Earl of Middleton. Patrick obtained a new charter to redesignate and redefine his earldom.He died on 15 May 1695.

(11) John Lyon (1663)

4th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne. The son of Helen Middleton, he was born on 8 May 1663. He married Elizabeth Stanhope on 21 September 1691. She was the daughter of Philip Stanhope, 2nd Earl of Chesterfield. He died on 10 May 1712.

(13) Patrick Lyon

Lord Glamis. He died before 10 September 1709.

(13) Philip Lyon (1693)

Lord Glamis. He was baptized on 29 October 1693. He died on 18 March 1712.

(13) John Lyon (1690)

5th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne. He was baptized on 27 April 1690. He d.s.p.

(13) Charles Lyon (1699)

6th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne. He was baptized on 12 July 1699. He married Susan Cochrane on 25 July 1725. She was the daughter of John Cochrane, 4th Earl of Dundonald. Charles d.s.p. 11 May 1728.

(13) Hendrie Lyon (1700)

He was baptized 01 July 1700. He died young.

(13) James Lyon (1702)

7th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne. He was baptized 24 December 1702. He married Mary Oliphant on 6 March 1731. She was the daughter of George Oliphant of the Langton family. He d.s.p. 04 January 1735.

(13) Thomas Lyon (1704)

8th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne. He was baptized 06 July 1704. He married Jean Nicholson on 20 July 1736. She was the daughter of James Nicholson of West Rainton. He died on 18 January 1753.

(14) John Lyon (1737)

Later Bowes, 9th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne. He was born on 17 July 1737. He married Mary Eleanor Bowes on 24 February 1767. She was the daughter of George Bowes of Streatham Castle and Gibside. He died on 07 March 1776.

John Lyon Bowes died in 1776. They had five children, John (the 10th Earl), George (1771-1806 d.s.p.), Thomas (the 11th Earl), Maria Jane, and Anna Maria.

Mary Eleanor, the Countess of Strathmore, next married Andrew Robinson Stoney, esquire, of the King's county, who likewise assumed the name of Bowes. This marriage was a disaster as "Stoney Bowes" treated Mary disgracefully. She obtained a divorce in 1789 and Stoney spent the last 20 years of his life in prison, dying there in 1810. It is from his name that we get the phrase "stoney broke" for hopelessly in debt.

(15) Earl John Bowes (1769)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656) (13) Sir George Bowes (1701) (14) Mary Eleanor Bowes (1749)

He succeeded as the 10th Earl of Strathmore. A Representative Peer, that is a Member of Parliament, he was also given the title of Lord Bowes which entitled him to a seat in the House of Lords without election. He was enrolled among the peers of the United Kingdom by the title of Baron Bowes of Streatlam Castle on 18 Jul 1815. He took the name of Bowes and later the surname Lyon was reincorporated to form the present name of Bowes-Lyon. He also quartered the arms of Bowes with his own.

On his deathbed John married Mary Milner, of Staindrop, on 2 July 1820 in an unsuccessful attempt to legitimize his natural son, John, who had been born in 1811. The Earl died on the day after his nuptials, on 3 July 1820, and the Scottish peerage devolved upon his brother, Thomas. The Barony expired with him.

(16) John Bowes (1811)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656) (13) Sir George Bowes (1701) (14) Mary Eleanor Bowes (1749) (15) Earl John Bowes (1769)

An illegitmate son in English law even though the old Earl did acknowledge him as his son and heir. The principal part of Earl John's fortune, including Streatlam, passed by will to his son, John Bowes, esquire, who unsuccessfully claimed the family honors. Those were usurped by his uncle, Thomas. John Bowes subsequently became a Liberal Member of Parliament. He resided at Streatlam Castle and carried out an extensive coal mining business. A noted philanthropist. He had a passion for racehorsing and won four Derbys. In 1852 he married a French actress and artist, Josephine Benoite-Coffin-Chevalier, the Countess of Montalbo. They built a French-style chateau in the village of Barnard Castle to house their vast art collection. This became the Bowes Museum. John Bowes died childless 1885; his wife followed in 1874. After his death Streatlam castle reverted to the Bowes-Lyon family. In 1927 it was sold, in its derelict state to Dr. Edleston for salvage.

(15) Honorable George Bowes (1771)

He was born in 1771. He married Mary Thornhill in 1805. He died in 1806.

(15) Earl Thomas Bowes (1773)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656) (13) Sir George Bowes (1701) (14) Mary Eleanor Bowes (1749)

The 11th Earl of Strathmore. He claimed the Earldom on the ground's of John's illegitimacy. He was born on 3 May 1773. He married Mary Carpenter. He died on 27 August 1846.

(16) Lord Thomas George Bowes-Lyon (1801)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656) (13) Sir George Bowes (1701) (14) Mary Eleanor Bowes (1749) (15) Earl Thomas Bowes (1773)

Lord Glamis. He was born on 6 February 1801. He married Charlotte Grinstead. He died on 27 January 1834 in his father's lifetime.

(17) Earl Thomas George Bowes-Lyon (1822)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656) (13) Sir George Bowes (1701) (14) Mary Eleanor Bowes (1749) (15) Earl Thomas Bowes (1773) (16) George Bowes-Lyon (1801)

He was born on 28 September 1822. The 12th Earl of Strathmore. An officer in the First Life Guards and a Representative Peer. He married Charlotte Maria Keppel, eldest daughter of William Keppel, sixth Viscount Barrington, on 30 April 1850. He d.s.p. At right is Streatlam Castle in 1840.

(17) Earl Claude George Bowes-Lyon (1824)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656) (13) Sir George Bowes (1701) (14) Mary Eleanor Bowes (1749) (15) Earl Thomas Bowes (1773) (16) George Bowes-Lyon (1801)

He was born on 21 July 1824. The 13th Earl of Strathmore. An officer in the Second Life Guards. He married Francis Dora Smith.

(18) Claude George Bowes-Lyon (1855)
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656) (13) Sir George Bowes (1701) (14) Mary Eleanor Bowes (1749) (15) Earl Thomas Bowes (1773) (16) George Bowes-Lyon (17) Claude George Bowes-Lyon (1824)

The 14th Earl of Strathmore. Lieutenant in the Second Life Guards. He married Nina Cecilia Cavendish-Bentinick.

(19) Lady Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon
(1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330) (4) Robert Bowes (c1360) (5) William Bowes (1389) (6) William Bowes II (1446) (7) Ralph Bowes (1468) (8) Richard Bowes (1498) (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) (10) Thomas Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (1607) (12) Sir William Bowes (1656) (13) Sir George Bowes (1701) (14) Mary Eleanor Bowes (1749) (15) Earl Thomas Bowes (1773) (16) George Bowes-Lyon (17) Claude George Bowes-Lyon (1824) (18) Claude George Bowes-Lyon (1855)

The Queen Mother. She was the youngest daughter of the 14th Earl. She married Prince Albert, the Duke of York. He was to become George VI. Their children were:

(20) Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor Her Majesty The Queen = Philip Mountbatten Duke Of Edinburgh

-- 1 Charles Philip Arthur George Windsor Prince Of Wales = Diana Frances Spencer

---- 1 William Arthur Philip Louis Of Wales

---- 2 Henry Charles Albert David Of Wales

-- 2 Anne Elizabeth Alice Louise Windsor Princess Royal = Captain Mark Phillips

---- 1 Peter Phillips

---- 2 Zara Phillips

-- 2 Anne Elizabeth Alice Louise Windsor Princess Royal = Commander Timothy Laurence

-- 3 Andrew Albert Christian Windsor Duke Of York = Sarah Margaret Fergusson Duchess Of York

---- 1 Eugenie Windsor

---- 2 Beatrice Windsor

-- 4 Edward Antony Richard Louis Windsor Duke Of Wessex = Sophie Helen Rhys-Jones Countess Of Wessex

(20) Margaret Rose Windsor = Antony Charles Robert Armstrong-Jones Earl Of Snowdon

-- 1 David Charles Albert Armstrong-Jones Viscount Linley = Serena Alleyne Stanhope

-- 2 Sarah Frances Elizabeth Armstrong-Jones = Daniel Chatto

---- 1 Samuel David Benedict Chatto

---- 2 Arthur Chatto


The Bowes Family of Elford

This line of the family begins with a marriage to the Huddleston heiress. "Thus began the line of the Bowes/Howard family at Elford which lasted up until the 1930s. Henry Bowes [Henry Howard, he assumed the Bowes name from his mother, Mary Bowes, wife of George Bowes. His children used the Howard name.], who became Earl of Berkshire and Suffolk, built a new Hall on the site of the old one in about 1725. Several of the cottages in the village date back to this time."

(-1) John Bowes (c1500)

I have a John Bowes, gentleman, esquire, of the manor of Oakley, Elford, Staffordshire. He began to lease this manor in 1530 and appears to have purchased it in 1532. Also of Hackney, in London, Middlesex. He had a wife, Dorothy, and son, John. He set up a house in Tamworth to maintain a priest to say mass in the local church. He died in 1564/5.

(1) Richard Bowes

Brother of John.

(1) Sir John Bowes (c1530)

Knight. He sold the Oakley manor to William Kooper [Kiper] in 1571/2. John married Anne Huddleston, one of the Huddleston heirs, and gained the manor of Elford. His second wife was Susannah Cave and their daughter, Elizabeth, married Sir Nicholas Heveningham. "John Bowes came of a race, which for some generations had been connected with Staffordshire. One John Bowes owned lands in Tipton, Stafford, Gnosall, Tamworth and Oakley in the reign of Edward V1 1547 1553. Little is known of Sir John Bowes beyond the appalling rows he had with his neighbour William Skeffington of Fisherwick. They fought over land and fishing rights in a most un-neighbourly and unchristian way. He is known to have been the father of a son Richard and a daughter Elizabeth, the latter born in 1580." - from "Miss Mary Dyott's Speech."

(2) Richard Bowes (c1560)
(1) Sir John Bowes

Of Elforde [sic], Staffordshire. Esquire. His wife was Joan. "Revocation by Richard Bowes of Elford co. Staff., esq., son of John Bowes, knt., deceased, of a bargain and sale to Sir Jerome Bowes of the parish of St. Martin in the Field co. Middlesex, the manor of Elford co. Staff. with all lands rights, courts and appurtenances. Creation dates: 13 May 1609."

I should also mention that during the Elizabethan period a Sir Jerome Bowes was ambassador to Russia during the reign of Ivan the Terrible. His trip there was apparently quite the voyage of exploration. He had a famous interview with the Tsar in which he so vigorously defended his queen that he enraged the Tsar, who then banished him. The Tsar, however, reflected that he wished he had councillor's who would so defend him, and called back Sir Jerome. He was also an author. He was given the patent monopoly for the production of Venetian glass in England. He married Elizabeth Garneys [Garnish], the daughter of Robert Garnish of Kenton, Suffolk. A "zealous" Protestant. A foe of the Earl of Leicester, for which he was banished from the court in 1577. I don't know how he is related. There is a full length portrait of him which I haven't yet seen. He died in 1616. His father may have been Ralph Bowes of Aldbrough manor. This might be the son of (9) Sir George Bowes (1529) of Streatlam castle.

During the civil War, Richard Bowes was a parliamentarian and protected the church, with the help of his Rector, Thomas Dowley, from being damaged by Cromwell's troops.

(3) John Bowes
(1) Sir John Bowes (2) Richard Bowes

(4) George Bowes
(1) Sir John Bowes (2) Richard Bowes (3) John Bowes

"Many years passed away and at the end of 1656 the last male heir of the race of Bowes of Elford died he was George Bowes who had married Mary Burdett of Bramcote near Polesworth. The union was not a long one, he died at the age of 36 and his widow survived him by 44 years. Their one and only son dying 4 years after his father at the age of 14. Mary Bowes born Burdett (known in Elford as old madam Bowes) was a remarkable woman. She had sound Christian principles, excellent judgement, shrewd foresight, masculine resolution, a kind heart and generous hand. She produced results most beneficial to the Elford Estates. She had one small daughter who was only 6 when her father died and she became heiress to the Elford Estates. Mary as she was christened married in 1683 Craven Howard but continued to live in Elford for the 17 years of her married life." - from "Miss Mary Dyott's Speech."



Lord Mayor Bowes of London

This Bowes' family included a Lord Mayor of London. Much of the following is based on Bulmer's "Geographical and Historical information from the year 1890." Note that Frances is not a family name in this descent.

(1) Sir William de Bowes (c1377)

Of York. I base his date of birth on the assumption that at the time of his first stint as Lord Mayor of York, below, he must have been a mature man, say 40 years old. He was successively Sheriff in 1402, Lord Mayor in 1417, and Member of Parliament for York in the first half of the 15th century. "William Bowes became Lord Mayor of York in 1417 and again in 1428." This probably means that he was a merchant, not a Lord. A Lord might be a Member of Parliament, but not the Lord Mayor, who came out of the ranks of the Aldermen. His house, known today as the Old Black Swan pub, on Peasholme Green, in York was the residence of the Bowes family in the 15th and 16th century.

Note that at about this same time Sir William Bowes of Streatlam Castle, who was born in 1389, succeeded his father, Sir Robert Bowes. He was noted to be the "sole surviving heir of the whole family." If these two Bowes' family's were related, then the split occurred very early. Sir Robert Bowes's line is: (1) Sir Adam Bowes (c1280) (2) Robert Bowes (c1310) (3) William Bowes (c1330). In this family's context, the surname may relate to "as coming from the village/region of Bowes."

(2) William Bowes (c1435)
(1) Sir William Bowes

Of York. Sir William had a son, named William, who was also Sheriff, M.P., and Lord Mayor of York.

(3) Thomas Bowes (c1465)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes

Of York. The fourth son of William. He married Johanna. He had a son, Sir Martin Bowes.

(4) Thomas Bowes Jr. (1500)

(4) Sir Martin Bowes (1497)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes

"Sir Martin Bowes [a native of York] established himself as a goldsmith in the City of London during the reign of Henry VII in 1545 [his maker's mark was probably a sheaf of arrows] and later rose to the position of jeweller to Queen Elizabeth. Whilst Lord Mayor of London in 1545 he interceded with the York authorities to preserve St. Cuthbert’s Church. Bowes cherished fond memories his early days in the parish, near to his family home. His plea for the church to be preserved was successful and with gratitude he gave to the city a sword decorated with pearls and precious stones. Some of these were stolen in the 17th century, but Martin Bowes’ sword later replenished with aquamarines and Scotch crystals still remains in the York civic possessions."

Said to be the most wealthy and powerful goldsmith of his time. He was thirteen times the Prime Warden. I believe this refers to the Goldsmith's company, a guild. They had four wardens, who were the company's executive committee. Their head was known as the Prime Warden. Martin was presented with a gold cup, now known as the "Bowes cup," by Elizabeth I after her cornonation banquet in 1558.

Elected Alderman of Milborne in 1536. Of Aldgate ward 1536-50, Castle Baynard 1540-2, Farringdon Within 1542-5, and Langbourn 1545-66. Auditor in 1536. Master of the Royal Mint from 1533 to 1544. Sheriff of London from 1540 to 1541. He was knighted on 18 March 1541 as a Knight of the Bath. Lord Mayor of London from 1545 to 1546. Under-Treasurer of the Mint from 1544 to 1551. Treasurer St. Bartholomew's Hospital in 1547. Comptroller-General of Hospitals from 1557 to 1566. Prime Warden of the Goldsmiths company for 13 terms, from 1559 to 1562. He was also a Member of Parliament for London in 1535, 1539 and from 1547 to 1554.

Sir Martin Bowes chose for a crest to his coat of arms, a lion rampant Gules clutching a sheaf of arrows Or. There is a Martin Bowes Road in the borough of Greenwich. He married Cicely Elyot [Cecilia Elliot] of London. Note that a Sir Thomas Elyot (1490-1546) was Clerk of the Privy Council. He is remembered especially for his sensible and well-written treatise on the education of statesmen, "The Book Named the Governour," dedicated to Henry VIII. Thomas was not a lord, receiving his knighthood for his services, and his sister or daughter might have made a good wife for Martin.

Martin died on 4 August 1566 and was buried at Staplehurst. Noted to be the "Sonne of Thomas (Martine) Bowes gentillman of the citie of London." His will, dated 29 July 1566, was proved on 21 January 1567. He left issue by his first wife, Cecilia. From the eldest son were descended the Bowes of Brumby Hall [Bromley Hall?], Essex, below. His second wife was Ann Barrett, whom he probably married in 1519 at St. Mary, Woolnoth, London. His third wife was Elizabeth Harlow [Harding, Herding?]. I have a grant deed of 2 November 1569 that identifies an Elizabeth Bowes, "late the wife of Martin Bowes, knight." She had subsequently married Christopher Lawrence [Lawrens].

A passionate bigot per Catholic Martyr web sites. Sir Martin had a daughter, Frances, who was the third wife of Matthew Hutton, Archbishop of York. Note that the grand-daughter of Matthew's older brother married Robert Bowes of the Bradley Hall line.

(5) Unknown Bowes
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (1497)

The first son?

(5) Martin Bowes (c1522)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (1497)

Sir Martin's second son was Martin Bowes - Bulmer's "Geographical and Historical information from the year 1890." He was born in about 1522 [?] at St. Mary Woolnoth.

St. Mary Woolnoth

St Mary Woolnoth, in Lombard Street, Langbourn ward, London was said to have been founded originally by Wulfnoth, a Saxon noble, on the site of a Roman Temple to Concord. It was first mentioned circa 1198/9. The church was rebuilt on the old foundations in 1438. In 1540 there is a record of payment to a clockmaster for keeping the chimes. It was damaged in the Great Fire and restored in 1677. The church was rebuilt in its current form between 1716 and 1724 by Nicholas Hawksmoor.

In the 31st year of the reign of Henry VIII the King granted the advowson of the church to Sir Martin Bowes, goldsmith.

Martin married Frances Clopton of Fore Hall, Long Melford, Suffolk in 1567/8. She was the daughter of William Clopton of Groton, who was the son of Richard Clopton, armiger, Lord of Castlings Manor. An armiger is an archaic term meaning a bearer of armor for a knight, that is, a squire. The term here, however, refers to a man entitled to bear arms. Martin was a goldsmith like his father. "A History of the County of York East Riding, Volume III", 1976, indicates that she may have been, in fact, the daughter of Richard Scrope.

His mark as a goldsmith was probably an 'M beneath a bow' device found on spoons for 1552/3 and on other plate 1548-1557/8. He worked from 1544 to 1573. His wife remarried in 1582, but then died in 1585. Their children were Cordelia, Frances [female], Richard Bowes Esquire of Babthorpe, and Sir Thomas Bowes of London. Martin's wife may have married next Matthew Hutton, Archbishop of York. The Archbishop's will bequeths a sum to his wive's son, Richard Bowes, and to Thomas Bowes.

An interesting note, the wife of William Bradford, the Governor of the Pilgrim's Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, was Dorothy May. She was a descendant of Frances Clopton and Martin Bowes. Dorothy’s place in history was assured the day she fell into the Cape Cod Harbor from the MAYFLOWER and drowned while her husband was absent exploring on shore. Whether it was an accident, or suicide, or murder, no one has ever known.

(6) Thomas Bowes Sr. (c1585)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes

Of London. I suspect his son was Thomas of Great Bromley, below. Sr [Sir or Senior?].

(6) Richard Bowes (c1585)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes

Of Darlington. He was the Lord of the manors of Hagthorpe, Babthorpe, and Bowthorpe [also referred to as Boythorp & Bugthorpe], and Justice of the Peace for the East and West Ridings of Yorkshire.

Hagthorpe - A farm of 166 acres. In 1612 Archbishop Matthew Hutton's son, Sir Timothy Hutton, sold the Hagthorpe manor to Richard Bowes, the son of Matthew's Hutton's wife, Frances Clopton Bowes, by a previous marriage. The Bowes family retained it until 1665, when Charles Bowes the younger sold it to James Strangeways. The profits of the manor were, however, enjoyed from 1668 to 1692 by Edward Kirlew and later by his son-in-law John Fenton, in satisfaction of the debts of Charles Bowes the elder.

Babthorpe - A farm of 270 acres. There is a medieval manor-house around which the remains of a moat are still evident. A gothic lodge stands on the main road at the entrance of the estate. In 1621 the manor of Babthorpe was conveyed by Sir William Babthorpe to Richard Bowes. The family also sold it circa 1665 to James Strangeways.

Bowthorpe - A farm with 2 houses.

Barlby - Barlby was sold by Sir William Babthorpe to Richard Bowes in 1621 . The family also sold it circa 1665 to James Strangeways.

Richard died in 1655, having had issue five sons and seven daughters.

(7) Charles Bowes (c1615)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes

The eldest son, he married Susannah Anlaby, the daughter of Thomas Anlaby, Esq., of Etton. He died in 1648, predeceasing his father, Richard, leaving three sons and one daughter. His widow later married Charles Fenwick.

(8) Charles Bowes Jr. (c1645)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes

He succeeded his grandfather, Richard Bowes. Charles Bowes "the younger" sold Hagthorpe, Babthorpe and Barlby manors in 1665 to satisfy his father's debts.

(8) Robert Bowes (c1645)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes

Perhaps a son of Charles who married Margaret Gregorie in 1641 [sic].

(8) Thomas Bowes (c1645)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes

The third son of Charles Bowes.

(9) John Bowes (c1675)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes (8) Thomas Bowes

He held a government appointment at South Shields, where he died in 1729.

(10) Richard Bowes (c1705)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes (8) Thomas Bowes (9) John Bowes

Esquire, of Darlington, he married Martha Maria Bellasyse in January 1740/1 in Cleasby York. She was born on 8 March 1721, the only daughter and heiress of Thomas Belasyse, of Haughton-le-Skerne, the last male heir of the Belasyses, of Murton House. Martha died in July 1767.

(11) Thomas Bowes (c1735)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes (8) Thomas Bowes (9) John Bowes (10) Richard Bowes

Esquire, of Darlington. The second and surviving son of Richard. He married Dorothy Stephenson on 8 February 1776. He was the chief magistrate and bailiff of that town from 1816 to 1846, and was the grandfather of the present owner of Monkend. I have a Thomas Bowes, solicitor, Darlington, Durhanm in the British National Archives, 1782-1880. I assume a descendent. Also, dated 25 July 1787 is an assignment by Thomas Bowes of Darlington, gentleman, of mortgage tolls of his grandfather, Thomas Bellasyse of Haughton, gentleman, of whose estate he was the administrator. I assume this means the old man had the right to certain tolls, which had been mortgaged, then given to John Clement. He died in 1806.

(12) Richard Bowes (c1765)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes (8) Thomas Bowes (9) John Bowes (10) Richard Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes

Esquire.

(12) Thomas Bowes (1777)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes (8) Thomas Bowes (9) John Bowes (10) Richard Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes

The son of Thomas Bowes, Esq., of Darlington per Terry Soucy. He was born on 23 February 1777. He married Elizabeth Crawford on 31 December 1807. He was the chief bailiff of Darlington. He died on 3 October 1846. Thomas had a daughter, Isabella, who married the Reverend John Topham. His children included Thomas, Richard, George, Dorothy, Catherine and Elizabeth.

(13) Richard Bowes (c1815)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes (8) Thomas Bowes (9) John Bowes (10) Richard Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (12) Thomas Bowes

He married Hester Le Forester.

(13) Thomas Bowes (1813)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes (8) Thomas Bowes (9) John Bowes (10) Richard Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (12) Thomas Bowes

He was Thomas Bowes II's eldest son.

(14) Richard Bowes (1859)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes (8) Thomas Bowes (9) John Bowes (10) Richard Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (12) Thomas Bowes (13) Thomas Bowes

(15?) Martyn Richard Belasyse Bowes (c1890)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Richard Bowes (7) Charles Bowes (8) Thomas Bowes (9) John Bowes (10) Richard Bowes (11) Thomas Bowes (12) Thomas Bowes (13) Thomas Bowes (14) Richard Bowes

A modern, he may be a generation or two later.


The Bowes Family of Great Bromley

Great Bromley [Brumby Hall? Much Bromley?] is in Essex, just east of Colchester. They are descended from the eldest son of Sir Martin Bowes, goldsmith of London.

(6) Thomas Bowes Sr. (c1585)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes

From above. Said to be "of London."

(7) Sir Thomas Bowes (c1606)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Thomas Bowes

Of Great Bromley, Essex. Knight. He was born in about 1606 in Much Bromley, Essex. He married Mary D'Ewes on 12 April 1616. She was born on 27 June 1608 in Coxden, Dorset. The D'Ewes family, Baronets of Stowlantoft, had married into the Clopton family in the previous generation. Thomas' brother, Martin Bowes, was to marry a Clopton as well, above. Thomas died after 1670. Their children were Bridgett, Thomas, Paul, Richard, Ciscillia and Matin. It was said of him that he was "a notorious witch-persecutor."

(8) Thomas Bowes Jr. (1627)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Thomas Bowes (7) Sir Thomas Bowes

Esquire. The son and heir of Sir Thomas, of Great Bromley. He was christened on 24 January 1627 in Great BromlEy. Admitted Trinity College, Cambridge 23 July 1646. Brother of Paul (1650), Richard (1658-9), and William (1664). He married Elizabeth Harlakenden on 23 October 1661 in Colne, England. He was buried at Great Bromley on 28 December 1680. Their children were Thomas Harlakenden Bowes (b1662, he married Elisabeth Smith) and Mary Bowes.

(8) Paul Bowes (1633)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Thomas Bowes (7) Sir Thomas Bowes

The son of Sir Thomas Bowes, of Great Bromley. Of Essex. He was born in 1633 in Great Bromley and christened on 5 February 1634. Gentleman. Attended Moulton, Norfolk school. Admitted at St. John's College, Cambridge on 21 December 1650. Admitted at the Middle Temple on 12 May 1654. Called to the Bar in 1661. A bencher. He married Bridget Sturges. The Father of Martin (1686) and brother of Richard (1658-9). Perhaps brother of Thomas (1646) and William (1663). He edited and published the manuscript work of his g-grandfather, Sir Simonds [Symonds] D'Ewes, "The Journals of all the Parliaments during the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, both of the House of Lords and House of Commons” in 1682.

He died in June 1702 and was buried on 8 July 1702 in St. Dunstans in the West, Fleet street. His children were Martin (b1670), Thomas (b1675), Richard (1676), Bridgett, Anne, and Francis.

(9) Martin Bowes (1670)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Thomas Bowes (7) Sir Thomas Bowes (8) Paul Bowes

Esquire. The son of Paul Bowes, gentleman. He was born on 24 May 1670 in London. He attended the Hatton Garden school. Admitted at St. John's College, Cambrige on 16 April 1686, but left without taking a degree. Admitted at the Middle Tempe on 22 June 1686. He took the Grand Tour and later became a London barrister and fellow of the Royal Society. He had a considerable library for the time including books on art, architecture and Roman antiquities. Guide books to Paris (item 14), Italy (item 107), Rome (items 40, 92), and Venice (item 79), of which the most recent carries a 1700 publication date, chart the course of his European travels. He married Elizabeth Thurland on 9 August 1706. He died on 5 September 1726 in Bury St. Edmund's, Suffolk. His children were Elizabeth, Ann and Isabella.

(9) Colonel Thomas Bowes (1675)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Thomas Bowes (7) Sir Thomas Bowes (8) Paul Bowes

He was christened on 2 November 1675 in St. Bride Fleet street, London.

(9) Richard Bowes (1676)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Thomas Bowes (7) Sir Thomas Bowes (8) Paul Bowes

He was christened on 23 February 1676 in St. Bride Fleet street, London.

(9) Francis Bowes (1678)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Thomas Bowes (7) Sir Thomas Bowes (8) Paul Bowes

He was christened on 24 June 1678 at St Bride street London. A Francis Bowes, born in London, was buried in London on 29 December 1693?

(8) Reverend Richard Bowes (1639)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Thomas Bowes (7) Sir Thomas Bowes

The son of Sir Thomas Bowes, of Great Bromley. He was born in Essex in 1639 and christened on 22 January 1639 in Great Bromley. He attended Dedham school. Admitted at Caius College, Cambridge on 7 January 1658-9. B.A. 1661. Ordained a priest at Lincoln on 22 December 1661. Rector of Great Bromley, Essex 1661. Rector of Stowlangtoft, Suffolk 1668. Lecturer at St. James, Bury St. Edmunds 1685. Perhaps M.A. from Corpus Christi 1674. He married Elizabeth Salter on 23 April 1663 in Great Bromley. He died on 14 October 1715 in Suffolk. The brother of Thomas (1646) and Paul (1650). His children were Thomas (b1665).

(8) William Bowes (c1647)
(1) Sir William Bowes (2) William Bowes (3) Thomas Bowes (4) Sir Martin Bowes (5) Martin Bowes (6) Thomas Bowes (7) Sir Thomas Bowes

The son of Sir Thomas Bowes, of Great Bromley. Of Middlesex. Admitted at Emmanuel College, Cambridge on 20 June 1663. B.A. 1665-6. M.A. 1669. Incorporated at Oxford in 1669. Ordained a deacon and priest at Lincoln on 17 May 1668. Rector of Tendring, Essex 1668. Great Bromley is in the Tendring Hundred. He was buried at Bromley on 19 April 1670. He predeceased his father and his effects were transferred to his father on 2 May 1670.


The Bowes Family of Angram Grange

This family apparently originated with a Miles Bowes of the township of Angram Grange, Coxwold parish, Yorkshire. He died in Welbury, a village near Brompton, in 1489. In the 16th century the family moved to a farm just outside Brompton. See . They are not able to link to the main Bowes' families, above.

From the Catholic Encyclopedia:

"Venerable Hugh Taylor, English martyr, born at Durham; hanged, drawn, and quartered at York, 25 (not 26) November, 1585. He arrived at Reims on 2 May, 1582, and having been ordained a priest was sent thence on the mission on 27 March, 1585. He was the first to suffer under the Statute 27 Eliz. c. 2. lately passed. On 26 November, Marmaduke Bowes, a married gentleman, was hanged for having harboured him. Bowes is described by Challoner as of Angram Grange near Appleton in Cleveland, but is not mentioned in the will of Christopher Bowes of Angram Grange, proved on 30 Sept., 1568, nor in the 1612 pedigree. The sole evidence against him was that of a former tutor to his children, an apostate Catholic. Having been previously imprisoned at York with his wife, he was under bond to appear at the Assizes which, began on 23 November at York, and on his arrival found that Taylor was about to be arraigned. Bowes, though always a Catholic at heart, had outwardly conformed to the Established Church. "Before his death he was made a member of the Catholic Church the which he boldly confessed with great alacrity of mind".
Angram Grange was described as the "seat of Marmaduke Bowes" in "Hearts of Oak - A study of the Recusancy in the Moorlands of NorthEast Yorkshire 1569 to 1840" by J.L. O'Connor.

See Angram.


The Bowes Family of Brompton Grange

See Bowes Family of Brompton, Northallerton for an exhaustive study of the many branches of this ancient family. Brompton Grange, at the right, was the home of this Bowes family until the 1830's. The following is from that site.

(1) Richard Bowes (1716)

He was born on 23 March 1716 in Brompton. He married Ann Kirkby. Their children were Ann, George and Elizabeth. A farmer, he built Brompton Grange. He died in 1790 in Brompton.

(2) George Bowes (1752)
(1) Richard Bowes (1716)

He was born on 5 May 1752 in Brompton. He married Margaret Harker on 11 October 1787 in Great Langton. Only one child, William, survived to adulthood. In the Land Tax return for Brompton in 1810 George Bowes wAs shown as being assessed at:
£ 17. 15. 5 for the property in which he resides
£ 0. 3 .2. on land occupied by George Fawcett,
£ 2 . 9 10 1/2 on land occupied by George Walker,
£ 0. 0. 9 1/2 pence on land occupied by Miss Sidgwick,
£ 0. 6. 9 on and occupied by sundry others.
In that year he is one of the largest Land Tax payers in Brompton and presumably therefore one of the largest landowners. Six years later in 1816 his liability was:
£ 18.12. 1 for property in which he resides.
£ 3.17. 7 for property occupied by Mrs Simmerthwaite
£ 6. 4 by John Wilson
£ 3. 2 by George Fawcett
£ 1.2 by George Wilson
£ 1.7 by George Wilson jnr
£ 9 by John Neesam
£ 1.7 by Sam Atkinson and others.
Again he is the largest Tax payer. George's son, William, appears on the role of 1816 and is assessed at:
£ 8. 14. 2.

After the Napoleonic wars George fell into financial difficulties and was forced to sell much of his property. He continued to farm at Brompton until the 1820s, however his financial difficulties were becoming great. In 1821 the position had dramatically changed and his liability was reduced to:
£ 1. 3. 9 His assigness for Elgus Mortgageî. This was assessed and exonerated.

He and his son, William, left Brompton and moved to Sunderland. He died on 30 January 1841 in Brompton.

(3) William Bowes (1789)
(1) Richard Bowes (1716) (2) George Bowes (1752)

He was born on 29 April 1789 in Brompton. He married Ann Cooper. A Gentleman Farmer, he appeared in the Brompton rate assessment of 1818 paying £ 6.10.0. In the 1823 Barnes Directory he was referred to as William Harker Bowes, Gent. He appears in the 1838 Tithe Assessment as a fairly substantial property owner much of which he rents out, mainly houses and workshops. In 1842 he acquired part of the Church Glebe land in the village.

William signed the Obligation to declare his late father George's effects on 9th Oct 1843. In which document he is described as a Miller of Southwick in the County of Durham. His son William also signs as of Southwick, Miller

William appears in the "Parties Index" for 1843 "William Bowes formerly of Brompton since of West Bolden in the County of Durham, farmer, since of Southwick Sunderland in the same County, Miller.

William Bowes was assigning rent charges on land to Directors of Sunderland Bank and others on 28th May 1844, 27th December 1843 and 16th Feb 1843 where he is described as of Rock Lodge, Monkswearmouth. Clearly by 1844 he was in financial difficulties. He must have failed in business about 1845 and 1851.

He moved to Sunderland in order to set up a business which appears in the records of Sunderland as "William Bowes and son, Corn millers, lime burners" and "William Bowes Junior, Corn miller, Low Southwick". In the 1851 census he is living at Front Street, Southwick, described as a retired miller and farmer, living with wife Ann aged 56, son John George aged 14, and given as having been born in Bishopswearmouth, Sunderland, and daughter Hannah aged 12 who was to die a tragic death. The 1851 census all the Bowes had left Brompton except for an M.H.Bowes, a woman aged 17 and born at West Bowlden. She was staying with a John Wilford as a guest on the night of the census. She was Mary Harker Bowes, William's daughter. William was a widower by 1861 census as was his son, John George.

He was engaged as a Party with land and rent transfers during the 1840s and in some cases the other parties were the Directors of the Sunderland Joint Stock Bank which suggests that he was in financial difficulties by then. In the 1861 Census however he still refers to him self as a Farmer of 113 acres of land employing one man, one boy, and two women. He went to South Africa, his daughter Margaret and her husband John Lowden having gone there previously. His son John George Bowes went with him and founded the South African branch of the family.

Thomas, William's grandson, states" I remember him well, a venerable looking man with snow white hair, a thorough English gentleman. He kept a farm at Southwick near Sunderland when I was a boy and used to ride a black horse. He was a good man and bore his misfortunes with Christian fortitude. He was lay Rector of Brompton. He died on 12 May 1867 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.

(4) John George Bowes (1838)
(1) Richard Bowes (1716) (2) George Bowes (1752) (3) William Bowes (1789)

He was born on 21 June 1838 in Brompton. He married Mary Jane Swalwell on 8 October 1859 in Monkswearmouth [!]. John George Bowes left Sunderland after the death of his wife in childbirth. With his one surviving child, William, he and his father arrived in Port Elizabeth, South Africa in 1846. They set up as butchers in Port Elizabeth and prospered greatly. Eventually his son William was taken into partnership and they victualled the ships anchoring at Port Elizabeth. He next married Caroline Sophia Henrietta Holland on 16 December 1866 in Port Elizabeth. They had no children. With his new wealth he bought land and on his death in 1910 handed over his wealth to his only child, William.

(5) William Bowes (1860)
(1) Richard Bowes (1716) (2) George Bowes (1752) (3) William Bowes (1789) (4) John George Bowes (1838)

He was born on 29 February 1860 in Sunderland, England. William married Edith Jane Wedderburn on 24 April 1889 in Grahamstown, South Africa. There were 4 children, John Hamilton, William Victor, Baron Batchelor, and Ruby Elizabeth. From these children are descended the present Bowes of South Africa. William died on 17 February 1926 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.


The Bowes Family of Thornton

(11) Francis Bowes (1597)

This Francis Bowes may be a precursor. A possible younger brother of Sir George Bowes of Bradley Hall. He was born on 24 August 1597 in Bishopwearmouth, Durham. Note that Thornton Hall was located in the parish of Bishopwearmouth and John Bowes, of the Streatlam Castle line, was Rector of the place from 1715 to 1721.

"Sir Francis Bowes, received in 1639, a grant of the old Bowes arms, with the addition of "three torteauxes in chief, for a difference," from Sir John Borough, garter, in consequence of a certificate from Sir George Bowes, of Bradley, whereby he acknowledged Francis Bowes [of Thornton county, Durham] to be a member of his family." - from "Wills and Inventories Illustrative of the History, Manners, etc."

(11) Henry Bowes

Was he an heir of the ancient Francis Bowes of Newcastle? "Hen. Bowes of Newcastle and Thornton Hall, merchant, who died during his shrievalty of Newcastle in the summer of 1624, was compounder's [Sir Francis Bowes] father, his mother being Anne, dau. of Fran. Anderson of Newcastle, merchant. Sir Fran. married (1) Eleanor, dau. of Hen. [and Elizabeth] Maddison of Newcastle (she died in Apr. 1636.) and (2) Margt. dau. of Robt. Delaval of Cowpen, who died in childbed at the age of 33, Aug. 5, 1652. He was sheriff of Newcastle in the municipal year 1632-33. and dying Apr. 23, 1677, aged 66, was buried at Coniscliffe, where his son Sir Fran. (No. 2), mourning the loss of his father, mohter, wife and children,set up a marble monument upon which is recorded his sorrows." - from "Records of the Committees for Compounding, Etc. with Delinquent Royalists in Durham . . ."

(12) Sir Francis Bowes (1621)

The son and heir of Henry Bowes of Newcastle-on-Tyne. Of Newcastle, knight. He was born in about 1621 in Thornton, Durham. A knight, of Thornton, Durham. He married Margaret De La Val in about 1647 in Thornton. Note that Sir George Bowes of Bradley Hall married Mary De La Val a generation earlier. She was the eldest daughter of Sir Ralph De la Val, of Seaton De la Val. I don't know how Margaret relates.

"The Mayor and Burgesses of the City of Newcastle-upon-Tyne got the "Grand Lease" of the manors of Whickham and Gateshead in 1600 and for the next two centuries maintained a firm hold on the coal trade and on mining along the Tyne, especially in North Durham through the Guild of the Company of Hostmen . . . Sir Francis Bowes, who had a share in the Grand Lease Colliery, was as his father had been before him a Newcastle merchant but not a Hostman, fortunately for him both his mother and his wife were daughters of Hostmen." - from Alistair Mills.
Hostmen were an informal subgroup of the Merchant Adventurers who controlled the mining around Newcastle. Only Newcastle burgesses or freemen could trade and ship coal on the Tyne, and 'host' or act as middle-men for business merchants and buyers. In practice the trade was controlled by a leading group of under 20 Hostmen, known locally as the "Lords of Coal". The Grand Lease controlled the richest coal-lands around Gateshead in the Durham bishopric.

Was Francis the son of Sir George Bowes and a Hostman via his mother, a De La Val, and his wife, a De La Val also? (10) Sir John De La Val of Dissington (c1577) marrried Elizabeth Selby, whose father was part of the inner-circle of Hostmen that ran the coal trade in Durham. Perhaps Sir Francis was actually of generation (11).

"Francis Bowes of Thornton, county Durham, cousin of the Whiggish Delavals of Seaton Delaval." - from "The House of Commons 1690-1715"

If Sir George were Francis' father, then (12) Ralph Bowes (c1620) was his elder brother who inherited the estates. How then do we explain "his father had been before him a Newcastle merchant?" Could Sir George be considered a merchant because of his coal trade? Note also that Sir George had a daughter, Ann, who married Sir Francis Blakiston. The Blakiston's may have figured prominently in (14) Francis Bowes (1684) move to Maryland.

Another possibility is that Sir George was his uncle. On 8 August 1659 Sir George Bowes and Francis Bowes, gentleman, were restored to their former freedoms of Newcastle - from the archives of Parliament. Was this Francis a brother or son of Sir George?

A lawyer and an Alderman of the city, he was in a pack-a-trouble in 1644/5 [or was this the senior Francis Bowes?]. On 19 November 1644 he and a Major Ralph Bowes were mentioned in a list presented to Parliament on 19 November 1644 of who were "delinquents" in regard to the collection of customs in the city by the Scots army. He was awfully young to be so prominently involved. Note again the brother, Ralph, who may be the Ralph Bowes who inherited Bradley Hall.

The Situation in 1644

In 1644 the Civil War between Charles I and Parliament still raged. The city of Durham and Newcastle-upon-Type were Royalist strongholds. When a Scottish army of over 20,000 men under the command of Lord Leven arrived at the gates of the Town they were met by Mayor John Marley and the 800 Royalist soldiers 900 Townsfolk still remaining to defend the city. The main body of the Town's soldiers had been called south to Marston Moor where the army of Charles I was subjected to a crushig defeat by the New Modern Army of Oliver Cromwell.

In the aftermath of that battle the town was surrounded and totally cut off. Bombarded by cannon and its walls breached by mines, the town was finally taken. Mayor Marley was found and placed in the castle dungeon, from which he escaped. Charles I hearing of the brave defence of the Town gave the Town its motto, Fortiter Defendit Triumphans. The town was occuppied under February 1647.

On 19 November the Parliament also considered how a new Mayor and Aldermen would be chosen for the city. On 5 December they agreed to the establishement of martial law and,

"Resolved, &c. That Sir John Marley Knight, the present Mayor, be forthwith disabled from being Mayor and Alderman, and brought to condign Punishment, for his notorious Rebellions against the Parliament: And that Sir George Baker Knight, Recorder, Sir Nicholas Cole Baronet, Thomas Liddell Esquire, newly made Baronet, Sir Francis Bowes Knight, Ralph Cole, and Ralph Cock, Aldermen of that Town, James Cole Sheriff, be displaced and removed from their Offices, and disabled and disfranchised; and likewise the rest of the Aldermen and other Officers there, who have been in Rebellion against the Parliament, as they shall be presented to the House, be displaced and removed from their Offices." - from House of Commons Journal Volume 3 5 December 1644
Note that John Blakiston, a near relative of the Bowes' family, was appointed an Alderman of the city. See the Blakiston family history, below, and John's role in Parliament's cause.

Francis Bowes position had clearly been high in the Royalist camp. Parliament directed his arrest in a motion of 13 December 1644,

"Ordered, That Sir Wm. Riddell be committed Prisoner to the Tower; Mr. James Cole, Henry Rowcastle, Sir George Baker, and Sir Francis Bowes, to the Compter in Southwark; Edward Scott, and Thomas Blinkishop, to Winchester House; Captain Rippen, and Henry Marley, to Peter House; John Marley, and Wm. Marley, to Ely House; Mr. Cole, and Mr. Robson, to London House; Mr. Ralph Cock, and Mr. George Cock, to Lambeth House; for levying actual War against the Parliament." - from House of Commons Journal Volume 3 13 December 1644
I don't know if Frances was apprehended or if he was in fact jailed. He was mentioned again in Parliament on 26 May 1645 in an "Ordnance for disfranchising the Mayor and others of Newcastle upon Tyne, and putting others in their Places.
"Forasmuch as the Town of Newcastle upon Tyne, and the County thereof, hath, by a malignant and wicked Party, ill-affected to the King and Parliament, and the true Protestant Religion, been brought to great Extremity and Misery; and for that the said Town cannot be reduced to due Obedience, and well governed, except the Delinquents therein be removed from the Offices and Places of Trust which formerly they held and enjoyed there, and have abused to the great Prejudice and almost Ruin of the said Town; and that others, of Fidelity to the King and Parliament, be put into their Rooms and Places; the which cannot be so speedily effected, in the ordinary and usual Way of Elections, by and according to the Charters of the said Town, as Necessity requireth: It is therefore Ordered and Ordained, by the Lords and Commons in this present Parliament assembled, That Sir John Marley Knight, the present Mayor of the said Town, be forthwith displaced, disabled, and disfranchised, and be removed from being Mayor, Alderman, and Freeman of the said Town . . . And it is further Ordained, by the said Lords and Commons, that Sir George Baker Knight, Recorder of the said Town, for his notorious Delinquency, be displaced and removed; and that Edmond Wright, of Greyes Inn, Esquire, be Recorder of the said Town; and that Sir Nicholas Cole Baronet, Thomas Lidell Esquire, Sir Francis Bowes Knight, Ralph Cole, and Ralph Cocke, Esquires, Aldermen of the said Town, and notorious Delinquents against the King and Parliament, be displaced, disabled, and disfranchised, and be removed from being Aldermen and Freemen of the said Town . . ." - from: "House of Lords Journal," Volume 7, 26 May 1645.

The Compter

This was a prison in the Compter borough of Southwark, in the London south of the Thames. Considering its reputation, it is not surprising that Southwark had more prisons than London. The more well known locations were the Clink which housed religious offenders, the King's Bench for "debt, trespass and other causes," the Marshalsea for debtors, religious prisons, and pirates, East Smithfield Prison for "theefe or paltry debters," and New Prison for heretics. Others include The Counter in the Poultry, The Compter, the White Lion, the Hole at St. Katherines, and the Lord Wentworth's. The Compter was reserved generally for felons and debtors.

I have a reference, in the Index Nominum to the Royalist Composition Papers, to a General Francis Bowes. After the Restoration he may have been High Sheriff of Northumberland in 1681.

Thornton Hall

In the parish of Bishop Wearmouth near Pickering, in the North Riding of Yorkshire. The hall is of 17th century date, though its foundations are probably medieval. It was home to the Thornton family in the 13th century and the Bollings in the 14th and 15th centuries. The daughter and sole heir of the Bollings married into the Tempest family in 1497 and Thornton Hall passed to that family in 1502. However, in 1620 Sir Richard Tempest, the family fortunes dwindling, sold his Thornton manors to a Mr. Watmough. It then passed to the Midgely family before passing to John Cockcroft and then Mr Stanhope.


(13) Francis Bowes II (1648)
(12) Sir Francis Bowes (1621)

The eldest son of Sir Francis Bowes, Knight, of Thornton, per "Cambridge Universtiy Alumni, 1261-1900." Young Francis was born in 1648. Of county Durham. He attended the Coniscliffe school, in Darlington, county Durham. Admitted to Cambridge Univestiy, Christ's College at the age of 16 on 14 April 1664. Admitted at Gray's Inn on 29 April 1669. I have a Francis Bowes esquire who was High Sheriff of Northumberland in 1681. He died and was buried on 11 September 1697. Brother of Robert (1665).

"Francis Bowes of Thornton, county Durham, son of Sir Francis Bowes of the same place, married Lucy, uterine sister of Sir Henry Fletcher, by whom he had, with other children who died in infancy, four daughters." - from "Six North County Diaries."

(13) Robert Bowes (c1649)
(12) Sir Francis Bowes (1621)

Son of Sir Francis Knight, of Thornton, Durham per "Cambridge Universtiy Alumni, 1261-1900." He attended the Coniscliffe school. Admitted to Christs College, Cambridge on 1 February 1665/6 at the age of 16. Admitted at Gray's Inn on 2 April 1668. He succeeded his brother, Francis, in 1697. He was buried on 4 April 1734. We can assume that Francis had no sons, since Robert succeeded him. Robert, then, is a conceivable father for "our" Francis, below. While this doesn't get me close to the Bowes of Streatlam Castle, I like this possible link, especially because Robert was a lawyer, like his "son."

(13) Mary Bowes (1651)
(12) Sir Francis Bowes (1621)

Note that I also have a George-Wanley Bowes, esquire of Thornton, in the county of York, who married Anne Hutton of Marske [there's that Hutton connection again]. They had three daughters, their father's co-heirs, per Burke's Commoners. The Durham Library has the "plan of estate at Crawcrook belonging to George Wanley Bowes, Esq." The Wanley's were a Thornton area family. George may have had a lease on the Cowpen and Crowcrook colllieries. This brings him closer to the Streatlam family.

There is also a reference to a Colonel Francis Bowes in 1714. The British archives have the will of a Francis Bowes, dated 24 May 1720, Lieutenant Colonel in the Honorable Colonel Stanhope Cottens Regiment of Foot of Gibraltar.


The Bowes Family in America

(19) [or 14?] Sir Francis Bowes (1684)

He was born in 1684 in England - based on his year of death and age as recorded on his tombstone. He emigrated to America and, as such, I assume he was not a first son. I don't know who his father was nor from what part of the family he came, but I propose it was the main line depicted above as the Bradley Hall or Streatlam Castle families. I have the following reasons for believing that. The following are organized from the least appealing to the most.
- 1st, his name was Francis. Not a strong point, but it is important to recognize that certain names run in families. The Streatlam/Bradley line favors William, George, Ralph, and Francis. From Jan Strum's page about Francis, "One "authority say Sir Francis was a cadet of this house [Bowes of Streatlam Castle]."

- 2nd, he was well educated and had read law. That is, he wasn't a country yokel.

- 3rd, he became a Judge of the Royal court in Hunterdon county, Trenton. In that era it took more than education and ability to get such a job, it took preferment.

- 4th, he had been knighted. While I acknowledge that fake titles are a staple of American history and lore, the two frauds from Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn" leap to mind, Francis was in too exposed a position as a Royal judge to pull this off. Francis' family in America was pretty proud of their father. His daughter Mary named her son Francis Bowes Sayre. Another daughter, Esther, had no sons, but her daughters named their sons Francis Bowes Stevens and Francis Bowes Stockton. Of course I should also point out that many people of diverse backgrounds were knighted. In Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" one of Mr. Bingley's sisters says to the other, in what is supposed to be a stinging comment, that "He probably ran a kind of shop before being elevated to the knighthood." Now that I've so thoroughly weakened this point, on to . . .

- 5th, George Blakiston, the Sheriff of Durham in 1656, emigrated to Maryland in about 1668. While this appears to be a non sequitur, the Blakiston family was closely associated with the Bowes family. They married into that family three times:

-- 1st, Elizabeth Bowes, the daughter of (9) Sir George Bowes (1517) of Streatlam Castle, was the second wife of Sir John Blakiston.

-- 2nd, Anne Bowes, the daughter of (11) Sir George Bowes (c1590) of Bradley Hall married Sir Francis Blakiston, of Gibside. He died on 8 October 1713 and his Baronetcy became extinct. However, his estates descended to his only surviving child and heir, Elizabeth Blakiston.
---- By the way, Francis Blakiston's brother, William, had married Mary Calvert, a daughter of Cecil Calvert, the 2nd Lord Baltimore and proprietor of the Maryland colony, in 1650. However, William died childless and Francis inherited his estates.

-- 3rd, (12) Sir William Bowes (1656) of Streatlam Castle married Elizabeth Blakiston in 1693. She was the daughter of Sir Francis Blakiston and Anne Bowes, above, and brought with her the Gibside estates that "made" the Bowes family. Their son was Sir George Bowes.

So, in my theory the Blakiston's established the link with Maryland, through the patronage of their Calvert kin, when George Blakiston settled there in 1668. Also important to Sir Francis' move, I believe, was Nathaniel Blakiston, the great-grandson of Elizabeth Bowes. In 1698 he was appointed Governor of Maryland. Illness forced him to return to England in 1702, but before he left he was appointed the agent in London for the colony, in which capacity he served 1702-09 and 1713-1721. He was also the agent for Virginia at some point. Note, as the colonial agent he was in an excellent position to both recommend the colony to Sir Francis and to secure him a position there. I think Francis may have bee a cousin or nephew of Nathaniel Blakiston.

I recently received the following email from Jan Strum, from who I quoted above,

Any chance you know what 'page about Francis' you got it from? It's not in my current database notes, nor have I tracked it down in old research documents. I just found the Christ Church headstone readings in Jan 2003, so that note could be older. (I started the hunt in 1978, so I've gone through several family tree programs & computers. To say nothing of bad habits regarding sources!)

Francis Bowes’ headstone reading from Christ Episcopal Church, Philadelphia: In memory of Francis Bowes who departed this Life Dec'r y'e 3rd 1749 Aged about 65 years. Also Mary his Wife who departed this life Oct'r y'e 20th 1725 Aged 26 years & 11 months. [So, with my Family Tree Maker calculation, her birth date was 20 Nov 1698]

Their daughter's headstone: I found her headstone inscription at Ancestry.com on 17 Jan 2003. It's on page 65 (image 33 of 34) from "Record of the Inscriptions in the Tablets and Gravestones in the Burial-Grounds of Christ Church, Philadelphia" Section A, LXXXIV. In memory of THEODOSIA the wife of Andrew Reed who departed this life the 19th of March 1753 Aged 32 years. Live's maze I've trod; I've met th' appointed Day; And here in Dust now sleeps my breathless clay. The Blow how sudden; how severe the Dart; How early levelled at my tender Heart. But stop, kind reader; cease to view me here; Know where I dwell, above the starry sphere. Would you, secure, the threats of Death defy, Like me religious live; like me serenely die. Her age (32) places her birth between Apr 1720 and Mar 1721.

In my estimation, MARY must be Theodosia's mother, NOT Anne Anthony, whom Francis married 18 Nov 1728. Some researchers DO have Anna Maria "Mary" Anthony - but 1725 death & 1728 marriage do NOT make it likely Mary & Anne are the same person. I just found a couple researchers have Anna Anthony, with parents Nicholas Anthony & Enjeltje Schoonmaker, b 1700 NJ, d 1725 PA. This'll take some digging! Some list 1719 marriage, some 1728 EVEN with 1725 death! Yikes! Bowes, Francis / (Hunterdon) / [N/A] Anthony, Anne / (Hunterdon) / [N/A] NJ / 18-Nov 1728 N/A Vol. XXII of the Archives of the State of New Jersey page 29.

Another day... Can I use your research/sources for increasing my tree when I work on these lines? Thanks for posting it!!

Jan Strum

Sir Francis Bowes married Mary in about 1718, though I don't know what evidence there is behind this date. The only evidence I have for her existence is her name, age and date of death, on her husband's tombstone in Philadelphia. This does not mean that she either was born, lived or died in that city, only that she was memorialized there. She was born in 1698.

There was a Francis Bowes living in Annapolis, Maryland as early as 1721. Note that this was while Nathaniel Blakiston was still the colonial agent for the colony. Maryland was the proprietory colony of Charles Calvert, the 5th Lord Baltimore, and a refuge for Catholics. Was is possible that Francis was a Catholic like so many of his Blakiston relatives? It would not be out of character for someone from the conservative north of England. There are a number of references to Francis in the Archives of Maryland in the period 1721 to 1725, the first of which titles him the Speaker of the Upper House of the Assembly. Importantly, in 1720 Charles Calvert commissioned his cousin, Captain Charles Calvert, to govern the colony and he did so from October 1720 to July 1727. Was Francis one of his chosen men who he took with him from England? The population of Catholic gentlemen in England was small so the choice of Francis may not be so extraordinary.

Maryland's Colonial Assembly

The colonial legislature became a bicameral body in 1650. The Upper House consisted of the governor and his council, all personally appointed by Lord Baltimore, the proprietor, and all dedicated to protecting his interests. Representative to the Lower House were elected by freemen of the colony and fought for more power by asserting exclusive rights in certain legislative areas, such as levying taxes and originating money bills. Disputing those claims, the Upper House sought to block such actions by the Lower House.

In 1689 Maryland ceased to be Lord Baltimore's proprietary estate and became a royal colony. This was the result of the "Glorious Revolution" in which the Protestant William and Mary replaced the Catholic James II. The royal governor allowed the Lower House much greater latitude in their agenda.

The colony was returned to proprietary control in 1715 under Charles Calvert, the 5th Lord Baltimore, but the Lower House remained in a much stronger position than in 1689.

From the Archives of Maryland, volume 34, Oct. 1720-Oct. 1723, "Jul. 18-Aug. 5, 1721 Upper House,"

- 1 August 1721: "Coll Addison from the Upper House Delivers Mr. Speaker Franics Bowes account amounting to Nineteen pounds ten Shillings for Entertaining Sundry Indians by order of the Governour and Councill thus Endorst Viz:
By the Upper House of Assembly August the 1st 1721.
The within Indians (among which was Towena a Great man of the Sinequas & the King of the Tuskeroras) for which the within Account was Charged were sent to the within Francis Bowes by Order of the Governour and Councill; they the said Indians having Come to wait on the Governour to make a Treaty of Peace with him toward a Reconciliation of Some Differences with some of the Inhabitants of Prince Georges County. Wherefore We Referr the said Bowes to your House for an Allowance of the within Account."

- 1 August 1721: "The Account of Francis Bowes for Entertainmt to Severall Indians and their Interpreters by Order of his Honour the Governour and Councill amounting in the whole to 19: 10: 0 being read is Order'd to be thus Endorst."

-1 August 1721: "By the Upper House of Assembly
Gentlemen. The Within Indians (amongst which Was Towena a Grean man of Sinequas & the King of the Tuskeroras) for which the within Account was Charged was Sent to the within Franics Bowes by Order of the Governour and Councill, they the said Indians having Come to Waite on the Governour to make a Treaty of Peace with hm towards a reconciliation of Some Difference with Some of the Inhabitants of Prince Georges County. Where We referr the said Bowes to your house for an Allowance of the within Account."
From the Archives of Maryland, volume 34, Oct. 1720-Oct. 1723, "Sep. 23-Oct. 26, 1723 Upper House,"
- 7 October 1723: "At a Conference held at the House of Mr Francis Bowes at the City of Annapolis on Monday the Seventh day of Octobr Anno Domini 1723 to Examine into the Indians Lands upon Nanticoke and Choptank Rivers."

- 17 October 1723: "At a Conference held at the House of Mr. Francis Bowes on Thursday the 17th Day of October 1723 to confer about the Allowances to be made to his Ldps Honorable Council of State."
From the Archives of Maryland 1698-1731, volume 25, "Proceedings of the Council of Maryland 1698-1731,"
- 20 February 1724/5: A proclamation was released after a meeting "At a Council held at the House of Mr. Francis Bowes in the City of Annapolis on Saturday the 20th day of February in the tenth year of his Lordships Domminion &c AD 1724/5."
From the Archives of Maryland, volume 35, 1724-1726, "Oct. 6-Nov. 4, 1724 Upper House,"
- 9 October 1724: "At a Conference held at the City of Annapolis at the House of Mr Francis Bowes on Friday October 9th 1724 . . ."
From the Archives of Maryland, volume 35, 1724-1726, "Oct. 6-Nov. 4, 1725 Upper House," - 14 October 1725: ". . .Comittee to Examine into Capt Rider and Mr Nickolls Claim to part of the Indian Lands &c. who will be ready to attend at the House of Mr Francis Bowes to morrow morning at nine of the Clock."

- 2 November 1725: "This House does appoint Philemon Lloyd Esqr & Colo Richard Tilghman to Conferr with such members of Your House as you shall Appoint at the House of Mr Francis Bowes upon the Subject of the late Address to his most Sacred Majesty and the great Damage we suffer by the Importation of Convicts but as to any other matters that you hint at in yor Message, we think it improper to Enter into any Conferrence thereupon, not knowing the Subject matter thereof especially Considering the Sessions so near a Conclusion Signed per Order Geo. Plater Cl. Up. Ho." Francis Bowes' wife, Mary, died on 29 October 1725.

I've found no records of Francis from November 1725 to 1728 when he got a position in the New Jersey colony. This aligns remarkably well with Charles Calvert's governorship, from 1721 to 1727, and may indicate a date and a reason that Francis moved - when his patron left, so did Francis. Captain Calvert had had only moderate success in administering the colony and was to be replaced by the Fifth Lord Baltimore's younger brother, Benedict Leonard Calvert, and, though probably not hostile to him, Benedict had his own men to promote. Benedict had also brought along another brother, Edward Henry, to assist him and this may have left little room for Francis.

By 1728 Francis had moved to Trenton, New Jersey where he was made a Judge of Hunterdon County, New Jersey in that same year. He married Anne [Anna] Anthony, of Hunterdon coutny, New Jersey, on 18 November 1728 - from Volume XXII of the Archives of the State of New Jersey, page 29. She was probably born in about 1700. Interestingly, it appears that their daughter, Theodosia, was born just one month later, in December 1728.

Francis was admitted as a counsellor [i.e. to the bar as a practicing lawyer] in 1731 and was noted to be a partner of Trenton's first lawyer, James Gould. As a lawyer his name appears in advertisements in connection with the sale of land. I think the following refers to an indentured servant whose "master" had died without a will. Francis held the bond as legal administrator for the estate.

7 September 1736. Thomas Hannah, of Trenton, Hunterdon Co., laborer. Int. [intestate, i.e. of a person dying without a will] Bond of Francis Bowes, of Trenton, Esquire, as administrator. Samuel Bustill, of Burlington, Esquire, surety. Witnesses – Sarah Ann Bustill and Joseph Rose. Hunterdon Wills, 111 J. - from "Calendar of New Jersey Wills," Volume I, 1670-1730
An "indentured bond-servant" was one who signed a contract to work as a servant (sold themselves into service) for a period of years, in return for passage to America, clothing, room, and board, and at the end of the period to receive sufficient land and tools to start as an independent farmer. If his master had died before this period of servitude was complete, the remaining service would be an asset of the estate.

At some point Anna Anthony died and Francis remarried. There was an 11-year hiatus between the birth of Theodosia in 1728 and Mary, his next child, in 1739, making it likely that Francis remarried in 1738 or 1739, though I have a source that claims this occurred in 1735, which also works. Also about this time he must have moved to New York City. Francis' second wife was Rachel Le Chevalier, the daughter of Jean Le Chevalier, a furniture maker or "joiner" of New York, and Maria Delaplaine, the daughter of another prominent New York joiner, Nicholas De La Plaine. Jean was born in Bretagne, France. A Huguenot, he emigrated to New York before 1692. Jean and Marie married on 27 June 1692 in New York City. Rachel was born on 16 February 1708 [or was it as early as 1693?]] in New York City and was baptized at the French Church. See for more about Jean Le Chevalier. Note that in records of John Cox of Bloomsbury, who married Francis' daughter, Esther Bowes, was a mention of "the Demoiselles Chevalier, the French aunts of Mrs. John Cox" who tended the roses of their garden.

Francis lived on Broad Street in New York City where he was the next door neighbor of John and Esther (Stillwell) Sayre.

Francis was a member of the Court of Justices & Freeholders in Trenton in 1739. The next year another daughter, Esther, was born, also in Trenton. In the 1741 census of Trenton township, Hunterdon county, New Jersey as Francis Bowes. His address at this time was given variously as Trenton, Christiana Bridge, in New Castle county, Delaware, and Philadelphia.

After 1741 he moved down river to Philadelphia. Francis' only son, John, was born in Philadelphia on 11 April 1742.

In 1747 Francis Bowes was listed as an attorney of Salem, New Jersey. In the same year, in New Castle county, Delaware, Francis Bowes was chosen as the guardian by Mary (born 1726) and Agnes Shannon. Their father, John Shannon, had died in 1745. John Shannon was a merchant with business interests in Jamaica. Francis was most likely his lawyer.

"In 1748 an iron works near Bordentown were advertised for sale. This was an extensive plant for that day, located on Black Creek, about a half a mile from "Burden's town. The creek was navigable for boats up to the works, and these works included three fires, with hammers, anvils, bellos and all appliances, also a dwelling-house and two dwellings for workment, stables, storehouses and various conveniences. The land covered twenty acres, or thereabouts, lying on both sides of the creek, with a small orchard of some forty well-grown apple trees. The owners, beside Mr. Reed [Andrew Reed, the husband of Theodosia], were Joseph Yard, David Davis and Francis Bowes, the latter, Mr. Reed's father-in-law, who was then residing in Philadelphia." - from "Maryland Genealogical and Memorial Encyclopedia."

Francis Bowes died on 3 December 1749 in Philadlephia and was buried at Christ Church, near to Captain William Heysham. The tombstone inscription reads:

"In memory of
Francis Bowes
who departed this Life December 3rd
1749 Aged about 65 years.

Also Mary his Wife
who departed this life October 29th 1725
Aged 26 years & 11 months"
The will of our Francis Bowes notes that he was at this time a merchant, though I expect even while employed as a Judge of Hunterdon county he probably "dabbled" in trade. Any man with money available probably took an interest, just as today we do in the stock market.
"Bowes, Francis. City of Philadelphia. Merchant.
Signed: January 27, 1747/8. Proved: December 12, 1749. J.203.
Wife: Rachel. Children: John, Theodosia Reed, Sarah, Mary and Ester.
Exec: Thomas Lawrence, John Kinsey, Peter Delage, Andrew Read[Reed], Rachel Bowes.
Wit: Ann Mullan, Elizh. Griffin, Ann Lindsay."
From a page maintained by Jan Strum is the notation, "In his will he speaks of the "many governments in which I have lived", among which his properties were scattered." This probably refers to the governments of the different colonies rather than of different countries. While I'm not certain of all of them, he apparently lived and worked under the governments of Maryland, New Jersey, New York [perhaps] and Pennsylvania, as well as having been born and lived in England. He left his law books to his son, John. From The Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Deed Abstracts, Book A159, 1729-1751 -
"Hans Zimmerman (John Carpenter) and wife Sallome to Exers. of Francis Bowes, Dec'd. for 442 acres on Cocalico Creek [in Lancaster county]. Sarah Bowes, Mary Bowes, Esther Bowes, John Bowes, infants under 21 were children of Francis Bowes. Executors of Francis Bowes were Thomas Lawrence, Peter Delage, Andrew Reed & Rachel Bowes, she being the widow of Francis. 17 May 1750."

Francis Bowes' Executors

Thomas Lawrence

Thomas Lawrence was born in 1689 and died in 1754. He was a member of a well-to-do Dutch merchant family in New York. In 1719 he married Rachel Longfield of New Brunswick, New Jersey. They settled in Philadelphia in the early 1720s. Lawrence soon became one of the city's most successful merchants, establishing partnerships with elite families including the Logans and the Shippens. Lawrence also had a long and distinguished career in public service. He served as Mayor for five separate terms: in 1727, 1728, 1734, 1749 and 1753. He died in office.

John Kinsey

A jurist, he was born in Philadelphia in 1693 and died in Burlington, New Jersey on 11 May 1750. He was the son of a Quaker preacher and the grandson of John Kinsey, one of the commissioners of the Proprietors of West Jersey, who came from London in 1677. The son was educated in the law and practised in the courts of New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Until 1730 Kinsey resided in New Jersey where he served in the assembly, and for several years was Speaker of that body. Starting in 1730 he lived in Philadelphia and in the same year was chosen to the assembly of Pennsylvania, to which body he was continuously re-elected till his death, and after 1739 was its Speaker. He was attorney-general of the province from 1738 till 1741, and in 1743 was appointed chief justice, which post he held until his death. He published "Laws of New Jersey (1733).

Peter Delage

A merchant and tradesman of Philadelphia. An advertisement calls him a 'Sugar-Baker,' living on the upper End of Second-street. He sold sugar, sugar canday, molasses and tea. I assume he also imported these items.

Andrew Reed

Francis Bowes' son-in-law, see below.

On 8 April 1751 at Christ Church, Philadelphia Francis Bowes's widow, Rachel, married John Sayre, whose wife, Esther Stillwell, had also recently died. For that part of the story see the Sayre and Heysham-Sayre pages.

(20) Theodosia Bowes (1728)

The daugher of Anna Anthony, Franics Bowes second wife, she was born in December 1728, just one month after her parents married. She married Andrew Reed on 22 August 1740. Andrew was born in about 1716 and died in 1769 in New Jersey. His father was Joseph Reed, a Scots-Irish who emigrated from Londonderry, Ireland. After accumulating considerable capital in the West Indies trade the elder Reed decided to settle his sons in America and, as early as 1700, was located in what is now Trenton, New Jersey.

Andrew, an active and prominent citizen of the community, was by turn postmaster, commissioner of the loan office, and one of the burgesses of Trenton. In 1749 he was commissioned one of the judges of the courts of Hunterdon county. He was a co-owner of the Bordentown iron works and of a 20-acre parcel of land with Francis Bowes of Philadelphia, his father-in-law. Andrew made Theodosia Bowes his second wife.

Andrew was a cousin and heir of James Logan in 1752. James Logan was truly one of the greats of early Philadelphia. William Penn made him "the Clerk of the Council, the Secretary of the Province, the Commissioner of Property, and the person responsible for the Indian’s well being." Logan was wildly successful in the fur-trade, becoming one of the richest men in America. A Scots-Irish Quaker, he died in 1751. Andrew was also an heir and executor of the estate of Stephen Williams, gentleman of Philadelphia, in 1762.

In 1749 Andrew moved his family to Philadelphia and opened a general merchandise store with his friend, John Petit, as Reed & Petit. After 10 successful years he moved back to Trenton. Reading the history of his son, Joseph, it is clear that, despite his inheritances, there was a bankruptcy around 1765 that forced Joseph to support the family.

Andrew and Sarah had six children, but their only surving sons were Bowes and Joseph. Bowes Reed was trained as a lawyer, but never practiced. He was a Revolutionary leader, a Colonel in the militia, and the mayor of Burlington, New Jersey. Joseph Reed was a lawyer and became famous as one of the leaders during the Revolutionary period. He was an aide-de-camp to General Washington, held the rank of Colonel in the Army, and saw service at the battles of Long Island, Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. He was elected President of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania. He would have been an acquaintance of Captain William Heysham. A daughter, Sarah, married Charles Pettit, son of Andrew's business partner, John Pettit. John Pettit was an Assistant Quarter Master General of the American Army serving under Nathaniel Greene and a close friend of John Cox, who married Theodosia's young sister, Esther.

Theodosia died on 19 March 1753. Her tombstone, in the Christ Church burial ground, lies between those of her sister's sons-in-law, J.H. Gibbon and Francis Bowes Sayre, reads:

"In memory of
Theodosia
the wife of Andrew Reed
who departed this life
the 19th of March 1753
Aged 32 years
Live's maze I've trod; I've met th' appointed Day;
And here in Dust now sleeps my breathless clay.
The Blow how sudden; how severe the Dart;
How early levelled at my tender Heart.
But stop, kind reader; cease to view me here;
Know where I dwell, above the starry sphere.
Would you, secure, the threat of Death defy,
Like me religious live; like me serenely die.

(20) Mary Bowes (1739)

I believe that Mary, and subsequent, are the children of Rachel Le Chevalier. Mary was born on 5 March 1739 in Trenton, New Jersey. She was ten years old when her father died and twelve when her mother married John Sayre. She married John Sayre Jr., her adoptive step-brother, and was the mother of, among others, Francis Bowes Sayre. She died on 11 January 1789 at Bloomsbury, the home of her sister, Esther Bowes Cox, in Trenton, New Jersey. For more about her life see the Sayre Family and the Heysham-Sayre pages.

(20) Esther Bowes (1740)

She was born on 6 January 1740 in Trenton, New Jersey. She married John Cox on 16 November 1760 in Christ Church in Philadelphia. She died on 10 February 1814 in Philadelphia. For more about her life, her husband, and her relationship with Francis Bowes Sayre, see the Heysham-Sayre page.

(20) Sarah Bowes (c1741)

I think she died in childhood, sometime after 1749, perhaps at the same time as her brother, John, below.

(20) John Bowes (1742)

He was born on 11 April 1742 in Philadelphia. He died on 29 March 1751.

Steve Hissem
San Diego, California